Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201019 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #495 on: October 16, 2014, 04:35:08 PM »
Sarasvati Puja:

The Navaratri festival is celebrated at the Matrubhuteswara Temple as Sri Ramanasramam.  This festival is dedicated to
Mother Goddess in Her various manifestations. It is a nine day festival and the ninth day is celebrated as Sarasvati Puja
or the worship of Goddess Sarasvati. On this day the traditional practice is to offer worship to books.

True tradition some books had been arranged on a stool placed beside Bhagavan's sofa.  Muruganar entered the Hall
and seeing the pile of books with flowers strewn over them, was quite amused.  He gave Bhagavan an eloquent look
and received an enigmatic smile in reply.  No words were required; the communication between them was perfect and total.

Muruganar could not understand the need for any symbols of divinity, when God Himself was seated in the Hall.  That is
why the worship of books in Bhagavan's presence struck him as being superfluous. In lines 321 and 322 of the Ramana
Puranam , Muruganar says, 'All ancient texts and their expositions put together can be more than a preface to the Book
of your Powerful Silence!'  He was amused by the idea of worshipping a pile of books in the very presence of the Repository
of all Knowledge,  Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi!  Muruganar expressed his feelings in the form of a beautiful poem, which
he wrote on a piece of paper and handed over to Bhagavan.

'Bhagavan!  This idea of placing books beside your sofa, and worshipping them with due reverence, is like placing the
chaff of sugar cane, beside sugar candy.  You are the sweet personification of perfection, O Bhagavan!  These books are
like the crushed sugarcane from which all the juice has been extracted. Of what value is the crushed sugarcane waste when]
one has the beautiful sugar figurine in one's possession?  You are the personification of the essence of all the knowledge
contained in all the scriptures.  When you are here, with us, can these books have any real value?

May be the books deserve to be worshipped after all. It could be that the crushed sugarcane considers itself worthy of
respect because is in the sugarcane that the sugar idol originated.  It seems to me that the sugarcane might expect some
recognition for this fact and has asked to be worshipped, for this reason.'

Bhagavan read this poem with a smile. At the end, he looked at Muruganar and nodded His head in appreciation of the views
expressed in the poem.  Muruganar later remarked to some friends that the incident struck him as being as inexplicable
as wanting to worship a portrait of Bhagavan in the very presence of Bhagavan Himself.

(This poem is lost along with many many poems of Muruganar)

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #496 on: October 16, 2014, 04:58:10 PM »
Real Samathi:

Sachidanada Yogeswara of Cuddappah was a famous Yogi.  Once he went round the whole country. He used to stay
in important places for three days and give talks.

He came to the Asramam also and talked to Sri Bhagavan and returned to where he was staying in the town.  We
were asked by his followers to listen to his talks. Pazhaniswami and I went there. At that time we were told that
Yogeswara was in Samadhi now. He will wake up at a particular time and give his talks.  Then he asked us. 'Is your
Bhagavan in Samadhi?' When he heard this, Sri Pazhaswami burst out in laughing. I said, 'For a Jnani there is no
specific time for being awake or in Samadhi. He was amused at your question.'

It is said in Janna Vasittam, also that whatever he might be doing, Jnani never goes into or out of Samadhi, though
he may be engaged in worldly activities.I told him that Sri Bhagavan was always om Samadhi.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #497 on: October 17, 2014, 02:53:30 AM »
The  matter turned towards Amrithanantha's verse.  The words Vararuchi and Yativara hardly needs any explanation.
Bhagavan was a gifted poet. Even Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni acknowledged the Bhagavan's prowess as a poet was far
superior to his own. Bhagavan was able to compose a Telugu poem in verse form that Kavyakanta was unable to adopt.
Furthermore, Bhagavan explained the intricacies of the grammatical rules governing that kind of verse. Bhagavan has
explained obscure rules of grammar to great scholars.  Bhagavan's knowledge and versatility as a poet is beyond compare.
So, equating Bhagavan to Vararuchi is quite apt and totally natural.  The term Yativara means 'the greatest of Seers'.
Even the Heads of Maths have acknowledged Bhagavan's unique stature.  He was truly the greatest of all Seers.  Thus
we see that Amrithanatha has described Bhagavan accurately, by comparing Him to Hari, Siva Guru, Vararuchi and
Yativara.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #498 on: October 17, 2014, 02:20:26 PM »
One morning Sri Bhagavan while perusing an issue of the Vision read out the following statement of C.S. Baci, which I took down.

'In the Grammar of God, there is no Number but Singular.  No Gender but Common.  No Tense but Present.  And no
Person but First.'

I was also shown by Sri Bhagavan two humorous and witty slokas by Sundarananda Swami  in which the Swami compares
Sri Bhagavan first to a potent exorciser, and secondly to the nine planets.  I copied them down. It was full moon day. As
usual, Sri Bhagavan got clean shaven.  When we all assembled in the Hall that afternoon, He jocularly remarked that He now
changed from a bearded old man into a baby.  'In fact,' He added, 'Jnana is a perpetual babyhood.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #499 on: October 17, 2014, 02:30:02 PM »
'Sofa Gounder'

B. V. Narasimhawami showed the Sadhus the way to be a quiet and independent life at Palakottu. Rangaswami Gounder
did a lot for the convenience of householders. Women and children were not permitted to say either in Palakottu or in the
Asramam after dusk.  They had to go into town and return in the morning.

Rangaswami Gounder was a rich devotee who used to come and see Sri Bhagavan frequently. It was he who gifted
the sofa on which Sri Bhagavan sat for years in the Old Hall. For this reason Gounder used to be called Sofa Gounder.
Gounder and Judge Sundaram Chettiar donated money for the construction of Gosala in the Asramam.

K. R. Ranganathan of Calcutta and I once suggested to Gounder that he should buy land near the Asramam for construction
of houses so that householders could stay in them.  He immediately acted on our suggestion, bought the land close to the
Asramam from one Mottayya Mudaliar.

Rangaswami Gounder then divided the land into plots and sold them to devotees at cost price.  This enabled the devotees to
construct housses to stay with their families. This is the present Sri Ramana Nagar and the person responsible for this was
Rangaswami Gounder.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       




 
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #500 on: October 18, 2014, 11:13:56 AM »
Sri Bhagavan fracturing His right side collarbone:

On April 25, 1942 and again two days later, an ardent fellow devotee. Sri A. Devaraja Mudaliar, wrote to me informing
me that on April 13, Sri Bhagavan had an accidental fall on the Asramam steps and His right collarbone was fractured.
That morning it seems, after breakfast, Sri Bhagavan while crossing the Asramam steps to go up the Hill, noticed a dog
chasing a squirrel on His path and interposed His walking stick to prevent the attack. The stick slipped and Sri Bhagavan
fell down. This accident exactly synchronized with a momentous political event, the sudden retreat of the invading Japanese
fleet from Madras coast to the countermanding orders from he home government.  Some of us saw a profound significance
in this coincidence and drew political parallels for the squirrel and the dog, and believed that Sri Bhagavan averted the national
disaster by taking it vicariously upon His person.  In any case, the alarm and anxiety caused the news of this accident served to
divert my mind from the oppressive sorrow of the recent bereavement.

G.V. Subbaramayaa's Reminiscences

Arunachala Siva.             


Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #501 on: October 18, 2014, 11:34:56 AM »
Get up! Get up!

Bhagavan used to be seated upon the stone sofa in the new hall in front of the Mother's Temple.  Ladies used to sit to the
right of Bhagavan's sofa.  Bhagavan stretched His legs in that direction, and so, we used to feel as though we had been
granted the rare privilege of sitting at His lotus feet.  I usually sat in the corner near the small door.  Bhagavan normally
used this door when he left the Hall to go to the cowshed.

One morning, I was sitting in my usual spot, deep in meditation. I did not even notice the arrival of Mouni with the day's
mail.  After going through the letters, Bhagavan was ready to  go to the cowshed, as per routine.  He massaged His legs
with oil, and got down from the sofa. Immediately, all devotees except me got up and made way for Bhagavan!  I was so
engrossed in meditation that I was totally unaware of what was going on around me.  I continued to sit there, directly
in Bhagavan's path.  When Bhagavan had come very close to the spot, a lady devotee tapped me and on the shoulder and
hissed in my ear, Get up! Get up quickly! Bhagavan has to go out and you are blocking the way.  With a violent start, I
opened my eyes. My legs had become numb from sitting in the same spot for a long time. So, I was not able to get
up immediately. Somehow, I managed to rise, and went to stand against the wall,

Bhagavan saw all this.  He was annoyed with the lady who had told me to get up.  He chided her in Telugu, 'Where was
the need to disturb her?  There is so much space here. You need not have woken her at all. Does devotion to Bhagavan
mean disturbing other people?'

The lady held me responsible for the fact that Bhagavan had rebuked her. She was angry with me,  She grumbled,'Some
people like to draw attention to themselves by pretending to be absorbed in meditation.' I tried my best to convince her
that I had really been unaware of Bhagavan's approach, but she remained sceptical. I was very much upset by the lady's attitude
but I could not do anything about it. 

From that time onwards, I never sat in that spot.  Every time I saw Bhagavan using the door way I felt consumed by guilt
I wanted to cry, 'I am very sorry Bhagavan. Please forgive me for having caused you so much trouble. Please start using
the small door again.'

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     
           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #502 on: October 18, 2014, 03:33:05 PM »
Sri Bhagavan's Compassion:

The residents of Palakottu used to return to Palakottu from the Asramam every day around 11.00 a.m. Sri Bhagavan used
to come to Palakottu around 11.30 a.m. after finishing His lunch.  We used to wait for His darshan there.  He would come
and ask about our welfare like a Mother.  We used to be overjoyed at His kind words. 

Everyday I used to participate in the Tamizh Parayana done in His presence.  There was hardly a day when I did not talk
to Him.  When the Asramam expanded and visitors increased, there were occasions when I could not speak to Sri Bhagavan.
On those days I would deliberately leave out a line while chanting in His Presence.  Sri Bhagavan would immediately complete
it for me. I used to feel happy that He had talked to me.

If I copied something in my notebook, I would deliberately leave out a line. I knew Sri Bhagavan would make the correction
in His own hand. I wanted Sri Bhagavan's handwriting to be in my note book.  I have done this several times.  I treasure
that notebook.

I wanted to paste a picture of Arunachala Hill in the notebook.  I could not get it.  Sri Bhagavan came to know of this and
drew a picture of Arunachala.  I consider it as an act of Grace.  It is this picture that appears in Mountain Path.

The proofs of Ulladu Narpadu, Upadesa Undiayar used to be given to Sri Bhagavan. If one or two pages were missing in them,
He would write those in His own handwriting and make a book out of the proof sheets.  He would have two or more like this.
He would retain the one with the maximum number of mistakes and the rest He would give to us.  'These are enough for us.
Where we would go for money to buy new books?' Nobody will ask for these, nobody will steal these.' He would say.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #503 on: October 19, 2014, 09:25:25 AM »
Bhagavan always radiated tremendous peace, but on those occasions when crowds were attracted to the Asramam such
as Jayanti, Maha Puja, Maha Deepam and such functions, this radiation increased to an extraordinary degree. The numbers
seemed to call up some reserve of hidden force, and it was a great experience to sit with Him at such times.  His eyes
took on a far away look and He sat absolutely still, as if unconscious of His surroundings, except for an occasional
smile of recognition as some old devotee prostrated.

Bhagavan, never encouraged people who came and started to confess their sins.  He would not allow them to continue
but shut them up by telling them not to dwell on the past but to find out who they were now in the present.  The point
was not the act but attachment to it that mattered.  Dwelling on it in retrospect was a the worst thing they could possibly
do.  This itself was attachment.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #504 on: October 19, 2014, 10:54:26 AM »
G.V. Subbaramayya's wife's death:

But soon after lunch the attendant called me saying I was wanted by Sri Bhagavan.  Now I knew of course that
Sri Bhagavan would be alone and resting.  As came into His presence, handing my head, there emanated a piercing
shriek where from I knew not. At once, all my physical faculties failed me and I collapsed. When I came to myself,
Sri Bhagavan called me close to Him and made me sit near His feet. He spoke only a few words. But His tranquil
look overflowing with Grace dwelt long upon me and most effectively healed my heart's wound.  The gist of what
He said was this:

'The thought that she has gone must be got rid of.  She has not gone anywhere, She abides in the Self as the Self.
How can she be non existent? Without God's existence can we exist?  Likewise without her existence where are the
children, where is the family?'

Thereafter I met Him alone almost every midday and freely poured out the surging emotions of my heart. Sri Bhagavan
would give me patient hearing and a word or two of true solace.  On June 17, I complained to Him saying, 'Bhagavan
nowadays she does not appear to me in dream.  So even that comfort is denied to me.' 

At this Bhagavan smiled sadly and said, 'What! Do you find comfort in dream vision?' 'Yes, Bhagavan' I replied, 'I should
be a hypocrite if I hid my real feeling.'  On hearing this, Sri Bhagavan sighed and kept silent.

That night I lay on the pial opposite the verandah where He was sleeping. I saw a big choultry. The door was ajar.  A group
of elderly Brahmins blocked the entrance and were peeing in. My old uncle of Kasi was prominent among them. And pointing
out to some one inside, he told them, 'Look there. She is the eldest daughter in law of the house. She is not an ordinary woman.
She is all gold. On hearing this, I too was impelled by curiosity to stand tip toe behind these brahmins and to look in over
their shoulders, when lo! I beheld her, my dear, departed wife. She was seated on the floor and I must confess that never
when she was alive did I have such clear and vivid vision of her as now.  A flood of bliss engulfed me and for how long I knew
not until there suddenly rushed upon me the consciousness that it was all a dream!  A dream! This thought let loose on me
such overpowering sorrow as I had never felt before.

Unable to contain myself I sat up and saw Sri Bhagavan returning to the Hall with a torch on His hand.  Immediately I got
up and followed Sri Bhagavan inside the Hall near the sofa. He asked me, 'What! Why are you like that? Did you have the
dream?' I replied 'yes' and with great difficulty I related to Him the dream.Then He said, 'Why do you grieve now?  You wanted
the dream vision and you had it. You thought it would bring comfort.  Instead it has proved a crushing grief. All illusion is
sorrow. Only the Real Self is true happiness.'

The whole incident was a grand mystery, a miracle  of Sri Bhagavan's Grace and it made me recollect the famous lines of
Shakespeare:

There are more things in heaven and earth
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.


Arunachala Siva.

                               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #505 on: October 19, 2014, 01:13:50 PM »
Devotees' Adventure and Sri Bhagavan's Forgiveness:

Once we decided to to the Hill top. We engaged four coolies and asked them to carry food for us and wait at the Seven
Streams on the way to the top.  Mrs. Taleyarkhan, Cohen, some devotees from Bose compound and some devotees from
outside, in all about forty, left as a group. We prostrated before Sri Bhagavan before we left. Muruganar, Munagala Venkataramayya,
Kalyana Sundaram Iyer (who was working in the Asramam Book Depot), an English devotee by name Thompson and his friend,
a Zamindar's son, and friend's bodyguard and myself had planned to go first and to join the other party later. This was a secret
agreement among us and we did not tell either Sri Bhagavan or other members of the party whom we saw off at Namasivaya's Cave.

Keeping in view the three streams mentioned by Sri Bhagavan, we started climbing the Hill at 6.00 a.m. Around noon, we
crossed the three streams and reached a steep place. We could not see either the foot or the top of the Hill. We were perplexed.
We could not see Muruganar.  We looked for him and found him in a bush.  When we called him, he came crawling on all fours
like a child.  We asked him why he walked like that.  He said, 'How should I walk then?' Venkataramayya was lying on the
ground breathless. Kalyana Sundaram Iyer was speechless. Thompson was sitting absolutely stunned. His friend and the servant
were sobbing in fear.  I, who was responsible for all this, did not know what to do.

"This is my end', I thought.  I felt wretched that I would be leaving the world without seeing Sri Bhagavan's face. I wept.
Even if I was saved, if one of my companions  died, how could I go and see Sri Bhagavan?  In case such  a thing happened,
I felt that I should give up my life also.  The thought that I wouldn't see Sri Bhagavan any more made me feel wretched. Till
then I had not prayed for anything.  On this occasion, a prayer  came to out of me: 'Oh Lord! See we don't  meet our end
without seeing you.  Please forgive us.'

Almost immediately, I saw a wood cutter at a distance and shouted at him.  He did not respond thinking that we were forest
guards.  We waved our ochre robe and said we were from the Asramam and he need not be afraid of us. He came to us and
said: Why did you come here?  You cannot go to the Hill top from here.'  We said we wanted to go to Ezhu Sunai, (Seven
Springs), he took us by our hand and brought us to others, who were waiting for us. By Sri Bhagavan's Grace, there was a
light shower which drenched us and we felt cool and refreshed.

The others had eaten and wondered what had happened to us.  Looking at our torn clothes, and the scratches on our body,
they teased us for attempting to go to the banyan tree without telling them.

We ate, took some rest and came down to Virupaksha Cave. We all wondered how we could go and see Sri Bhagavan in this
state. What could we tell him? First we sent Thompson and his friend to their house in town, we sent away Mrs. Taleyarkhan
Cohen and others also.  Four of us stayed back till dusk and went to Palakottu.

In the meantime, Thompson and his friends went straight to the Asramam, as they felt they should see Sri Bhagavan ,
who had saved us from a dangerous plight.  They prostrated to Sri Bhagavan outside the Hall without being seen by Him.
Munagala also did like that.

Without knowing any of this, I went  to Palakottu, had my bath and went and prostrated before Sri Bhagavan
around 7.00 p.m.  Sri Bhagavan asked: 'What mischief have you done?' I was shaken completely by this question.
'The Zamindar's son came in an awful condition and prostrated outside the Hall.  Munagala, whose condition was
much worse, did the same.  What mischief have you done?'

I narrated everything that had happened. I said, 'If we had told you of our plan first, you wouldn't have given permission.
Hence we left without telling you.  We have been punished for going without your permission. Please forgive us.'

Sri Bhagavan said: 'If you had told me, I would have asked you not to go. All right.'  I took His 'all right' for forgiveness
and was greatly relieved.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         
                                               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #506 on: October 19, 2014, 01:35:59 PM »
Self is everywhere:

One day, there was a Sadhu among the gathering of devotees in the Hall. From his appearance, it was obvious, that he was
deep in spiritual practice.  It looked as though he was waiting for an opportunity  to ask Bhagavan something. When he felt
that the time was right, the Sadhu approached Bhagavan and said, 'Bhagavan! It is said that the Self is present in everything.
Does that mean that the Self is to be found even in a dead body?"

When He heard this, Bhagavan exclaimed, 'Oh! This is what you want.  Is it? Is  it the dead body who wants to know or is it
you? Who is asking this question?'  The Sadhu replied, 'It is I who want to know, Bhagavan.'  Then Bhagavan said, 'While
you are asleep, do you wonder, 'Am  I here or not?' It is only in the wakeful state, that you say, 'I am'. Similarly the Self
is definitely present even in a dead body. But if you inquire further, you will realize that both the dead body and the living
body are both illusory.  That which moves we label as being 'alive'. And that which is motionless we say is 'dead' This
differentiation is only in our minds.  In our dreams we see both 'living' and the 'dead'. As soon as we wake up, we realize
that both the living and the dead of our dreams are but illusions.  In the same way, this entire universe is nothing more than
a grand illusion.  The birth  of the 'I thought' is referred to as birth and the disappearance of the I thought is death.  What
we call birth and death therefore are nothing but appearance and disappearance of the I thought.  Both birth and death
are for the ego alone.  Neither birth nor death can touch the 'I' which forms the essence of your being., When the awareness
of the self is strong you are there; you are equally there when the self awareness fades. It is 'you' that is the source of
the I  thought.  But the 'I-thought' is not you. Realization is nothing but perceiving the source of the cycle of birth and death.
That is you must 'die' and still remain aware,  He who 'dies' with awareness is transformed into pure Self.  That is, when the ego
dies, the Self is born.  When this happens, all doubts vanish immediately. The veil of illusion is lifted and everything is
perceived properly.  All confusion is removed.  The differentiations between birth and death, living and the dead, everything
disappears.  The Self is all knowing.  The Self has no doubts. It is only the ego that is plagued by doubts.'

On hearing this explanation, the Sadhu's face glowed with understanding.  It was obvious that he had finally found the answer
to the question that had obviously bothered him for a long time. Can such wonderful lesson be learned from any book?
Only Bhagavan could give such a clear, concise and convincing reply to such a question.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #507 on: October 20, 2014, 01:37:51 PM »
Bhagavan was invariably kind to all animals though He did not like cats, or I believe, mongooses, this was principally because
the cats hunted His beloved squirrels or chipmunks. These squirrels used to run in and out  of the Hall window, over His couch
and even His body. He would feed them with nuts and stroke them, some them even had names.  Their chief ambition seemed
to be to make nests behind His pillows so that they might bring up their families under His protection. Snakes and scorpions
were never allowed to be killed.  Sometimes a snake would drop off from the roof of the Hall at night. It was the duty of the
attendant to show it out to safety by walking behind it with a lamp, as carried in front it would dazzle the snake and it would
become confused.  Madhavan, the best attendant, He had, would anticipate Bhagavan's least wish was adept at picking up
scorpions by tail so they they could not sting and carrying them outside where they could do no harm.  For dogs, Bhagavan
always had a tender spot. One puppy that was born in the Asramam had rickets. Bhagavan was very solicitous and under His
direction, I treated it and eventually cured it with biochemical medicines. Strangely this dog proved unfaithful and and ran away.
Bhagavan said that it must have been killed by some beast or it would never have gone. But a few months later it returned with
a new master it had adopted, it took little interest in any of us, even in Bhagavan.  This was inexplicable.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #508 on: October 20, 2014, 01:52:03 PM »
The origin of Upadesa Undiyar:

The rishis living in Daruka forest performed several sacrifices and rites and believed that by means of these they would
attain liberation. Their wives also thought they were the best woman ion the world. Lord Siva wanted to divert the rishis
attention from action to Jnana.  He appeared among them as a wandering monk.  With him came Vishnu in the form
of a beautiful woman.  The rishis fall madl in love with this woman and their wives fell in love with the sadhu. Enraged at
their wives' behavior and determined to destroy the sadhu, the rishis created an elephant and a tiger and set them against
him.  Siva killed both and used the elephant's skin as his upper cloth and the tiger's skin as a wrap. They tried to kill
Siva in several ways but in vain.  Then they realized that they were in the presence of a superior person and asked him
to instruct them.

Muruganar was writing this story in Tamizh verse, but when he came to the instruction part he asked Sri Bhagavan,
the incarnation of Siva to write it. Sri Bhagavan wrote it in thirty verses in Tamizh.  In this he had discussed karma,
bhakti, yoga and jnana. Sri Bhagavan made it in Sanskrit at the instance of Kavyakanta and Lakshmana Sarma.
At the instance of Yogi Ramiah it was made by Sri Bhagavan in Telugu. He made it first in prose and then made it
in the form of sutra at the instance of Kavyakanta. I and Ramakrishna Swami wanted it in Malayalam and He wrote it
in the form of a kummi song.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     
       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #509 on: October 20, 2014, 02:45:32 PM »
Ramana Puranam:

Ramana Sannidhi Murai of Muruganar has been modeled on the Tiruvachakam of Manikkavachagar. The very first verse
in Tiruvachakam is a very beautiful one, titled Siva Puranam.  But the first edition of Ramana Sannidhi Murai did not contain
an equivalent verse. Muruganar wanted to to correct this inadequacy so he started composing the same type of verse. He had
written some lines when he was suddenly assailed by doubts regarding the appropriate title for this verse.

As Muruganar had followed the model of Tiruvachakam, he should have given the same title for this verse also.  But he wanted
to name it Ramana Puranam instead of Siva Puranam to signify that these verses were in praise of the living god, Sri Ramana.

He also felt obliged to follow the original in every detail.  Unable to come to a decision, Muruganar gathered the papers of this
unfinished verse and laid the bundle at Bhagavan's feet. He did not say anything about the confusion in  his mind.  He left the Hall.

It was evening when he returned to the Hall again.  Bhagavan beckoned him close, gave him back the papers and said, 'Have
a look at the papers.' 

One glance was enough. Muruganar became speechless.  Bhagavan had given the title to the verse as Ramana Puranam
and also finished the work by adding more lines to this long verse.  The second edition of Ramana Sannidhi Murai had this
Ramana Puranam added. Muruganar also mentioned from what line Sri Bhagavan had written and completed the verse. And
he made an asterik remark from the line from which Bhagavan had written and completed the work!

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.