Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 187294 times)

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #45 on: October 18, 2012, 06:57:50 PM »
An Old Telugu man with a long beard, an iron pot and chopper for cutting wood made his abode in the Draupadi temple.  He would beg some food in the town, boil something or other in his  iron pot on a small fire of wood cut with his chopper and eat it during the day.  For hours together he could be seen standing and looking at Bhagavan.  He would spend the night in the temple, which was dilapidated and abandoned and surrounded by jungle.   Once the writer of this piece found him standing all alone in front of the temple and gazing at  Arunachala."I sleep here", he said when the writer asked him what he was doing in the forsaken temple. "What, sleeping here all alone ,   Are you not afraid,"  Exclaimed Chalam.   The old man seemed indignant.  Afraid of what, Bhagavan throws  his light upon me.   All through the night I am surrounded by a blue raidance.  As long as his light is with me, how can I be afraid,"   The incident made Chalam deepply humble.  Bhagavan's love and light was given in full measure to a poor old beggar, while those  who pride themselves on being his chosen disciples are left  high and dry because they have thelsemves to attend to.

Boundless Ocean of Grace
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #46 on: October 18, 2012, 08:18:08 PM »
5th February, 1946 (36) KOWPINAVANTAH KHALU BHAGYAVANTAH(FORTUNATE ARE THOSE WITH A MERE LOINCLOTH)

You know, off and on, Bhagavan has been going through Sri Ramana Leela, which has recently been received
from the printers. In that connection, Rangaswami asked yesterday, “Has the story about the towel been written in it?”
As it was not in the book, Bhagavan told us as follows: “About forty years back — perhaps in 1906 — when I
was in Pachiamman Koil, I had with me only one Malayalam towel. It was given to me by somebody. As the material was
flimsy it became worn out within two months and was torn in several places. Palaniswami was not in town. I had therefore
to look after the cooking and all other domestic work. As I used to dry my feet and hands with the towel every now and
then, it got all sorts of colours. Its condition would be seen if I used it as a cover for the body. So I used to roll it and keep it
near at hand. What did it matter to me? It was enough if the required work gets done with its help. After bathing, I used to
dry myself with the towel, and then put it out to dry. I used to guard it carefully so that no one else would know about it.

One day a mischievous little boy saw when I was drying it,and said, ‘Swami, Swami, this towel is required by the
Governor. He has asked me to get it from you. Please give it to me.’ So saying he mischievously stretched out his hand.
‘Oh, dear! This towel! No, I cannot give it. Go away!’ I said. “As that towel gradually got torn more and more with a
thousand holes in it, I ceased to keep it with me lest it should
be seen by Sesha Iyer and others. I used it after my bath, and then after drying it, hid it in a hole in the trunk of a tree
within the temple precincts. One day, when I went out somewhere, Sesha Iyer and others, while searching for
something else, happened to search that hole in the tree trunk, and found the towel. Seeing its condition and blaming
themselves for their neglect, they began offering profuse apologies when I returned. ‘What is the matter?’ I asked. ‘Is
it this towel with a thousand holes that you are daily drying your body with after your bath? Shame on our devotion to
you! We could not find out even this.’ So saying, they brought several bundles of towels.

“Something else also happened before this. My kowpinam (small piece of cloth, usually a small strip, worn over the
privities) got torn. I do not usually ask anyone for anything.Bodily privacy has however to be maintained. Where could
I get a needle and thread available to mend the kowpinam?At last, I got hold of a thorn, made a hole in it, took out a
thread from the kowpinam itself, put it into the hole and thus
mended the cloth, and, so as to hide the place where it was mended, I used to fold it suitably before putting it on. Time
passed like that. What do we need? Such were those days!” said Bhagavan.

It was quite natural for him to tell us all this but we who heard him felt deeply grieved. Having heard this incident
from Bhagavan some time back, Muruganar is reported to have written a verse. The purport of that verse is:
“Oh, Venkata Ramana, who wore a kowpinam mended by a thorn, and who was served by Indra as a towel with a
thousand eyes.”

Letters from Sri Ramanasramam-Suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #47 on: October 18, 2012, 08:52:35 PM »
Dear Ravi,

Manikkavachagar also says about this torn koupina. Siva wears torn koupina.  But
Siva/Ramana is the Self.   What is there other than Self to wear? So Manikkavachagar says
Thannaiye kovanamai chatithanan kAn chAzhalo!


Once Chengalvaraya Mudaliar, a great scholar in Tirumurais and Tiruppugazh came to see Sri Bhagavan. He became speechless,
on seeing Sri Bhagavan. Muruganar who was with him asked: What is He wearing? Mudaliar immediately remembered this
Tiruchazhal verse and said, What can He wear? He is the  Self and Self is wearing only the Self!  He cried bitterly on quoting
this verse.   


என்னப்பன் எம்பிரான் எல்லார்க்குந் தானீசன்
துன்னம்பெய் கோவணமாக் கொள்ளுமது என்னேடீ?
மன்னுகலை துன்னுபொருள் மறைநான்கே வான்சரடாத்
தன்னையே கோவணமாச் சாத்தினன்காண் சாழலோ. 256


He is wearing torn koupina. But it is worn with four Vedas, all arts and Space as the cross thread.

Arunachala Siva.

swayam

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #48 on: October 19, 2012, 05:29:09 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya

Taken from - http://www.arunachala.org/newsletters/2002/mar-apr#article.2.


Pundit and Peasant

Once during a visit to the Ashram in the 1940s I was sitting outside the Old Hall with many devotees, facing Sri Bhagavan who was reclining on a couch. A group of learned pundits were discussing certain passages from the Upanishads with great enthusiasm and profundity. All, including Bhagavan, appeared to be attentively listening to this interesting discussion when, all of a sudden, Bhagavan rose from his couch, walked thirty meters to the north, and stood before a villager who was standing there looking lowly with palms joined.

Immediately the discussion stopped and all eyes were turned to Bhagavan and the villager standing at a distance. They appeared to be conversing, but at such a distance no one could tell about what. Soon Bhagavan returned to his couch and the discussion resumed.

I was curious about this villager and why Bhagavan had gone out of his way to meet him. So, while the discussion continued I slipped away and caught up with him before he left the Ashram. I asked the villager what he and Bhagavan had talked about. He said that Bhagavan had asked him why he was standing there so far away. "I told Bhagavan, 'I am only an ignorant, poor villager. How am I to approach you who are God incarnate?'"

"What did the Maharshi say then?" I asked.

"He asked me my name, what village I was from, what work I did and how many children I had, etc."

"Did you ask Him anything?"

"I asked Him how I could be saved and how I could earn His blessings."

"What did He tell you?"

"He asked me if there was a temple in my village. I told him there was. He wanted to know the name of the deity of that temple. I told Him the name. He then said that I should go on repeating the name of that deity and I would receive all the blessings needed."
I came back to Bhagavan's presence and sat among the devotees listening to the learned discussion, in which I had now lost all interest, realizing that the simple humility and devotion of this peasant had evoked a far greater response from our Master than any amount of learning. I then decided that, though a scholar by profession, I should always remain a humble, ignorant peasant at heart, and pray, like that villager, for Bhagavan's grace and blessings.

— Professor K.Swaminathan
------------------------------------------

Really - Boundless Ocean of Love

Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2012, 05:31:10 PM by swayam »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #49 on: October 19, 2012, 06:18:00 PM »
Dear Swayam,

Wonderful. It has been narrated by Prof. K. Swaminathan. Many simple peasants, rag pickers and dry grass cutters have
been benefited by Sri Bhagavan by  His simple penetrating gaze and simple upadesa like asking them to chant Siva, Siva
or Rama, Rama.

A Guru can do miracles by a mere gaze. Wolter Kiers did not speak a word with Him. He spent just two days with Him.
He got the way to liberation.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #50 on: October 19, 2012, 07:41:33 PM »
Dear All,

Once Sri Bhagavan was suffering from constipation. He had told the attendant to bring some kadukkai, a nut that if powdered and
eaten in water, would work as laxative. But the attendant forgot about it, perhaps. On that morning, some villager came to Him
and after darshan took out a bag with full of kadukkai nuts!  He said: Swami! I was coming to T'malai. On the road, a group of
carts were going in the front. From them, from out of a torn gunny bag, these nuts were falling one by one. I picked them up.
I do not know whether these are useful to You. Sri Bhagavan said: This is most useful for me now. Anyway, I should specially
thank you for these nuts! Please take lunch and go. Are you having enough money to go by bus to your village?  The villager
was quite happy and prostrated before Sri Bhagavan and took his lunch and left.

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #51 on: October 19, 2012, 07:52:02 PM »
Dear All,

This is what Manikkavachagar says in Kuzhaitha Pathu, (Decad on Melting), Verse 6:   

You know what I want. You confer me whatever I want in full.
You are rare even to Brahma and Vishnu but you have taken over as your servant
You shower Your Grace on me. If I want something else,
Even that is Your Grace and wish!     


வேண்டத்தக்க தறிவோய்நீ வேண்டமுழுதுந் தருவோய்நீ
வேண்டும் அயன்மாற் கரியோய்நீ வேண்டி என்னைப் பணிகொண்டாய்
வேண்டி நீயா தருள்செய்தாய் யானும் அதுவே வேண்டின் அல்லால்
வேண்டும் பரிசொன் றுண்டென்னில் அதுவும் உன்றன் விருப்பன்றே. 501


Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #52 on: October 20, 2012, 10:30:28 AM »
Dear Ravii,

This dual handling is somewhat difficult. That is why some make the mistakes again and again. What is wrong in stories/comments
coming under the same thread?

Arunachala Siva. 

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #53 on: October 20, 2012, 01:45:08 PM »
This following incident is like Lord Krishna's dictum in the gItA!

One day, I asked Bhagavan humourously, how he was able to receive the thousands of prostrations made before him everyday. Bhagavan relied, "I shall tell you a secret of it. I prostrate to them before they prostrate to me. Those that come to me only throw the body on the ground as a sign of their humiliy. That contents of the mind may not be equally good. Whatever the contents of the mind may be, when I look at them, I look not into the mind but into the chaitanya there, that is, the Atman, which is my Self and of which they are not aware. I am one with them while they are noti aware of it, that is, the kulasthA and brahman are inseparable. To me there are no others. I alone am. The further implication of this is that while they think that they are prostrating, they are not doing the real prostration (pranIdAnA). On the other hand, while I do not physically bow my eka bhAvA helps them in every way. Thus is all souls I am the kulasthA, and I see my own Being in all of them, so I can accept not some thousands of prostrations but any number of them. I am all of them, while they don't know that they are Myself.

(Reminiscences of TKsundarEsa Iyer)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #54 on: October 21, 2012, 11:43:46 AM »
In 1942, Bhagavan was near the back steps of the Asramam when he abruptly threw his stick before the path of a dog, which was in hot pursuit of a squirrel. In this successful attempt to save the squirrel, he lost his balance and fell, fracturing his right shoulder. Soon after this incident, when I was taking leave of Bhagavan to visit my village, I looked at the bandaged shoulder and wanted to ask him how he was feeling. But how could I? I knew perfectly well that his reaction would be to question regarding his physical well being.

On arriving at my village, I wrote a letter to Bhagavan in which I quoted the following verse:

It is improper to make inquiries about the health and welfare of those whose sole delight is in the Self, since they are strangers to those mental states, which distinguish betwee weal and woe.


भवत्सु कुशलप्रश्न आत्मारामेषु नेष्यते ।
कुशलाकुशला यत्र न सन्ति मतिवृत्तयः ॥


bhavatsu kushalaprashna AtmArAmEShu nEShyatE .
kushalAkushalA yatra na santi mativRuttayah ..

King prithu to Sage maitrEya:

In regard to personages like you, who are ever immersed in the bliss of the Self, it is not proper to enquire about health, welfare, etc. For in their minds there are no mental midifications of pleasure and pain, enjoyments and sufferings.

(IV, 22, 14)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #55 on: October 21, 2012, 05:59:46 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Once Sri Bhagavan was cutting some mango or some fruit. The knife razed His fingers and He was bleeding. The anxious devotees
asked: Shall we get some tincure  and bandage. Sri Bhagavan brushed His fingers on the towel and said: Nothing. The knife did
not raze me. I razed the knife!

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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ramaNA mAyanE
« Reply #56 on: October 22, 2012, 06:08:09 PM »
A very touching incident

muruganAr's wife, mInAkshi ammAl, was a frequent visitor to the Ashramam. bhagavAn was especially kind and considerate to this lady, and treated her as a favoured guest. Knowing that mInAkshi ammAl loved good coffee, bhagavAn would tell the Ashramam cooks, "Give mInAkshi good, strong coffee, just the way she likes it." bhagavaAn would also listen patiently  to mInAkshi ammAl's complaints about her husband,  the chief among those being, of course, that muruganAr was neglecting her and all his domestic responsibilities. On one of her visits, mInAkshi ammAlseemed particularly upset. She told bhagavAn that muruganAr's neglect was very difficult for her to bear, and that muruganAr seemed not to realise just how badly his behavious was affecting her.

It was mInAkshi ammAl's practice to sing few verses from muruganAr's ramaNa sannidhi murai in bhagavAn's presence, every time she came to Ashramam. On this occasion also, she had a copy of the book with her, and was about to select some suitable chapter. bhagavAn took the book from er hands and, marking the section where there was a decad of verses, each ending with 'ramaNA mAyavanE', he said to mInAkshi ammAl, "Look, mInAkshi! muruganAr will soon be returning from palakkOttu. As soon as he enters the hall, you must start singing these verses. But remember one thing! Each of these verses ends with the phrase, 'ramaNA mAyavanE'. You must substitute 'murugA mAyavanE' for 'ramaNA mAyavanE' when you sing. Is that clear? Now, taje your place and get ready, for muruganAr will be here soon."

mInAkshi ammAlwas a simple soul, and her faith in bhagavAn was total. So she agreed to do exactly as bhagavAn said, even though she had not idea why he should want her to do it. Now, the verses selected by bhagavAn were very well suited to the occasion because they presented the picture of a love-lorn lady chiding her lover for his cruel neglect. In these verses, muruganAr portrays himself as a love-lorn lady and entreats bhagavAn to favour him with his grace.

To be precise, the lady described the happy times she had shared with her Lord, and promises that he had made to her. Having won her with sweet words of love and assurances of undying devotion, her Lord had left her to dream about him and to wait eagerly for the time when he would come to claim her; but he had not come back. The lady chides her lover for his shameful neglect, and asks him what she had done, to deserve such cruel treatment from him. She bemoans her fate, regretting the fact that she had lost her heart to one so inconsistent, beguiled by his charm and his false promises. Each of the verses ends with the phrase, 'ramaNA mAyanE', (the term 'mAyavan' can be translated as 'the great deluder'). The lady is accusing her lover of misleading her with false promises. Yet, her langiage is far from abusive. In fact, her words are full of affection and reflect the remembered joy of happier times. Each of the poems in this section is exquisite in the beauty of expression and the delicacy of feeling.

As soon as muruganAr entered the hall, mInAkshi ammAl started singing the songs selected by bhagavAn. Following bhagavAn's instructions faithfully, she ended each verse with 'murugA mAyavanE'  instead of the original 'ramaNA mAyavanE'. The first time, muruganAr did not attach much importance to the substitution. Many devotees simply assumed that mInAkshi ammAl was making a reference to this aspect of bhagavAn's multi-faceted glory. When mInAkshi ammAlcame to the end of the second verse and there was still no response from muruganAr, bhagavAn glanced at him with eyes full of mischief. Then he directed a look of approval and encouragement at mInAkshi ammAl. Suddenly, muruganAr realised that some conspiracy was at work! By then, mInAkshi ammAl had ended the third verse also with 'murugA mAyavnE'. This repeated substitution of 'murugA mAyavanE'  for 'ramaNA mAyavanE' now appeared highly significant to muruganAr. He was finally convinced that bhagavAn was deliberatley teasing him, using mInAkshi ammAl as an innocent, yet effective agent!

muruganAr could think of only one couse of action - to leave the hall. Accordingly, he got up and was preparing to quietly slip out of the hall when bhagavAn stopped him with, "Hey! Why are you leaving the hall now? Is it not because she sang about her 'murugA mAyavan'? Well, does that mean that, whenever somebody sings about 'ramaNA mAyavan', I should immediately walk out of the hall? Is that not so?" Hearing bhagavAn's words, the entire hall dissolved in laughter. muruganAr made use of this diversion to make good his escape!

bhagavAn often played such practical jokes upon his devotees. But even while he was engaged in such apparently playful activities, bhagavAn continued to impart valuable knowledge to his devotees. Every joke and every little trick had its own lesson to teach.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #57 on: October 24, 2012, 11:58:12 AM »
Raghavachariar was coming to Maharshi off and on. His wife and mother feared that he might give up his social duties and become a recluse. They went to the Maharshi and told him their fear. The Maharshi consequently admonished Raghavachariar about the dangers of becoming a recluse without the severe training required for it. The Maharshi was giving similar advice to numerous others also.

(Self Realization, BV Narasimha Swami)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #58 on: October 25, 2012, 04:44:59 PM »
One evening, a female monkey entered the hall. A baby was hugging her belly.
The monkey approached the basket of fruits beside Bhagavan's sofa. The attendant
tried to drive her away. Bhagavan chided the attendant, saying, "She is a mother
with a child to feed. Can you not spare a few fruits for her?"
But the attendant did
not heed Bhagavan's words. Frightened by his threatening gestures, the monkey
ran away and climbed up a tree. Bhagavan said to his attendant, "This is all we are
capable of! We talk about our reverence for those who have renounced the world.
We seek out sanyasins and worship them.  But when a true sansayin comes to us,
we drive him away."


Bhagavan the looked at the monkey and beckoned her in soft and gentle tones.
The monkey approached and stood before Bhagavan's sofa. He gave it some
fruits and the monkey went away happily.
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #59 on: October 26, 2012, 10:47:53 AM »
Once when we were playing football, Venkataraman, while defending against the attacks of the opposing players, received a severe knock on his right leg, which immediately got swollen. He was frightened and had to return home and I carried him to a hospital and had some medicine applied and brought his leg to normal condition. He was very happy and thanked me for the timely help.

(Ranga Iyer)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta