Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 200897 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #285 on: September 04, 2013, 10:16:31 AM »

Major Chadwick:

On another occasion, I asked Bhagavan about suicide.  I had been cycling round the Hill and on meeting a bus, the thought
had come into my head: 'Why should I not concentrate on the Self and throw myself in front of the bus, so that in this way
I may attain moksha!'  (The last thought before dying confers the results of that thought.). 

I told this to Sri Bhagavan, but He said that it would not work.  Thoughts would spring up involuntarily as I fell, fear and the
shock would cause them, and thoughts coming, life would continue so that I would have to take another body.  If I could
still my mind sufficiently so that such a thing would not happen, then, what was the need of suicide?


Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #286 on: September 04, 2013, 11:44:41 AM »
Silent Power:

A. Venkateswara Sarma and Smt Sala: 

A. Venkateswara Sarma, a native of Keelapasalai village, Ramanathapuram District,  is an old devotee of Sri Bhagavan,
who along with his wife, Smt. Sala, equally devoted to Sri Bhagavan, likved in Sri Ramana Nagar.  Both are closely related
to Sri Bhagavan.

For over a decade, he studied Kavya (poetical literature in Sanskrit) gaining mastery in the same and also became an adept
in the science of astrology  by training he had for years at Vidyalaya in Kerala.  In his early days while staying at Kandanur,
he had a remarkable experience.  He saw the portrait of Sri Bhagavan in his majestic standing posture,   with a penetrating
look which not merely seemed but was really felt as directed only to him and which thrilled his whole being.  The experience
proved a great urge to have Sri Bhagavan's darshan immediately.

He started the very next day and arrived at Tiruvannamalai, his luggage consisting of a panchangam (almanac) in one
hand and an umbrella in the other.  That was in 1920.  He climbed up the Hill to Skandasramam, and recognizing Sri
Bhagavan who was seated then under a nelli tree, he hastened to  prostrate at His feet, spontaneously reciting in a state
of ecstatic inspiration, the first sloka of Sri Dakshinamurti Stotram.

'Look, look at the visitor who has come -- Subbu's son, is it not?' So exclaimed Sri Bhagavan, turning to His Mother who was
there.  The mother gave him a hearty welcome and made him feel at home.  Delighted by the stay with Sri Bhagavan that
night, he was guided to do giri pradakshina next day.  He expressed an ardent desire to stay with Sri Bhagavan for good
and pleaded that he did not want to marry but wished to remain with Him and serve Him and do pujas.  The Mother would
have none of it , he had duties to perform, she reminded him and an uncle's daughter awaiting to marry with him.  He was
then 22 years old. Sri Bhagavan consoled him, 'What does it matter if you do puja here or get married or whether you are
here or elsewhere.? And so he left !

Since then Sri Sarma was coming to Sri Bhagavan from time to time, often staying for a month or two and benefiting by
Sri Bhagavan's utterances and His silent influence with devotion and piety.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #287 on: September 05, 2013, 01:35:39 PM »
Major Chadwick:

It was during the war, many people were talking about aeroplanes, bombs and other wonderful things that were being made
for the sake of destruction. Bhagavan remarked that there was nothing very wonderful in all that, they had had all these things
in ancient India.  Rama had his flower-care (pushpaka vimanam) which was nothing but an aeroplane, and in accounts of the
ancient wars, we find mentioned,  fire-weapons, diamond weapons, and even electric weapons besides many others which are
described in ancient books.  Modern man thinks he is wonderful but the ancients knew many more things than he imagines.
They had a combination of metals by which they were able to overcome gravity.  People have not succeeded in doing that yet.

A question was once asked, if human beings were ever reborn as animals.  'Oh, yes,' said Bhagavan, 'even  today they will take
on such forms just to be born here.' 

An instance of this is certainly the Cow Lakshmi. 

One night a dog stood on a rock at the back of the Asramam and barked without stopping.  At last Bhagavan told someone
to take it some food.  This was done, the dog ate it and quickly went away.  It was not seen again.  Bhagavan explained that
it was some Siddha who had taken to come here and have a meal as he was hungry.  There were many such about, He said,
but they did not wish to make themselves known and so came like this.

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #288 on: September 05, 2013, 01:50:27 PM »
Silent Power - Sri Venkateswara Sarma:

continues.....

Though a successful astrologer by profession, especially in the branch of prasna (astrological forecasting on the basis of
the exact time of the client's question), Sri Venkateswara Sarma felt the futility of leading a bread-earning life and hence
came to Sri Ramanasramam in 1939, along with his wife; and lived with Sri Bhagavan's sister's family.  (Alamelu Athai).
In 1946, they took up abode at Adi Annmalai, four miles away from the Asramam on the circumambulation path, after duly
informing Sri Bhagavan.  They went round the Hill daily sometimes twice a day and thus had darshan of Sri Bhagavan on
the way. 

Sri Sarma compiled a short history of Sri Bhagavan's life consisting of 120 slokas in Sanskrit, known as Ramana Charitramrutasaram,
which Sri Bhagavan graciously perused and corrected.  He also composed songs in Tamizh and presented them to
Sri Bhagavan, who used to correct them only sparingly.  Such corrections were not only grammatical in content but also
vitally enriched them with spiritual depth.  For instance, in the following verse: 'Those who are caught in the mouth of a
great tiger, are certain to die in this world; but all those caught in the glance (drishti) of the great tiger get merged with
natural ease in the eternal happiness, discarding fear with natural ease.  'iyal' in the place of 'daily' (nidham) of Sri Sarma!

Since 1948, he settled with his wife and only son in Tiruvannamalai town.  The son passed away four years later. Both
parents feel they survived the shock only by Bhagavan's grace. They continued to render service at the Shrines of Sri
Bhagavan and the Mother, assisting in the daily routine -- perhaps as a fulfillment of his former sankalpa to do puja to
Sri Bhagavan!  He felt: 'Sri Bhagavan is ever present in my mind and heart, in jagrat and swapna and his manifest grace
only is sustaining us in all circumstances and at all times!'

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #289 on: September 05, 2013, 02:49:23 PM »
Sri T.K. Sundaresa Iyer - At the Feet of Bhagavan:


Devotees of Sri Bhagavan are aware only of His famous Upadesa Saram and a few isolated verses as His contributions
to the language of Gods i.e. Sanskrit.  So it is necessary to place on record His contribution to the famous Uma Sahasram
- a thousand verses on Uma, the Divine Mother, by His great disciple, the learned Sri Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni.  The story
shows the Maharshi as the joint author of this composition.

Sri Bhagavan was then living in the Pachiamman Temple, the abode of Maragathamba, on the north eastern slopes of
Arunachala.  In those days, the Maharshi would sit and sleep in a hammock slung between  two stone pillars and be rocked
as a darling child by His loving pupils. 

Sri Kavyakanta had composed 700 stanzas on Uma in some thirty different meters, and had announced to his devotees
in various parts of the country that this poem would be dedicated on a certain Friday in the great temple of Sri Arunachaleswara.
Over a hundred persons gathered at the Pachiamman Temple so as to be present on the occasion next day.  Now these
Sanskrit verses were a mere intellectual display by Sri Kavyakanta, great as he was in Sanskrit compositions.  Proof of his
great intellectual capacity may be had from the very fact that in the presence of the heads of the Udipi Maths he composed
extempore in a single hour the hundred verses of the Ghanta Sataka, giving the cream of the teaching of the three main schools
of Hindu philosophy.

His Uma Sahasram is different from other compositions in that it is 'pasyanti vak' i.e. revealed by the Divine Mother in Her own
words to one who is adept in the Kundalini Yoga.

At about 8.00 pm. on the evening before the dedication day, after supper, Sri Maharshi asked Sri Kavyakanta whether dedication
would have to be postponed to some other Friday, as 300 verses were still to be composed to complete the thousand.  But Sri
Kavyakanta assured Bhagavan that he would complete the poem immediately. 

The scene that followed can hardly be believed by one who did not actually witness it.  Sri Maharshi sat silent and in deep
meditation like the silent Lord Dakshinamurti.  The eager disciples watched in tense admiration the sweet flow of divine music
in Sanskrit verse, as it came from the lips of the great and magnetic personality of Muni.  He stood there delivering the verses
in unbroken stream while disciples eagerly gathered the words and wrote them down.  Oh, for the ecstasy of it all!  Life is indeed
is blessed if only to experience those divine moments.

The Sahasram was finsihed in several meters Madalekha, Pramanika, Upajati Aryagiri etc., For a while the disciples present
enjoyed the deep ecstasy of silence pervading the atmosphere, as Sri Kavyakanta concluded with normal type of colophone.
Then Sri Bhagavan opened His eyes and asked, 'Has all that I said been taken down?' From Ganapati  Muni came the ready
and grateful response, 'Bhagavan, ALL THAT BHAGAVAN INSPIRED IN ME HAS BEEN TAKEN DOWN !'

It is thus clear that Sri Bhagavan inspired the final 300 verses of the Uma Sahasram through the lips of Sri Kavyakanta, without
speaking a word, as usually understood, or rather in silence characteristic of the Silent Sage of Arunachala. It is noteworthy that
whereas Sri Kavyakanta revised the first 700 verses of this monumental work some six times, he did not revise any of the last 300.

This being Sri Bhagavan's own utterance, there was no need to improve them!  These 300 verses are to be considered as Sri
Bhagavan's unique contribution to Sanskrit poetry.

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #290 on: September 06, 2013, 11:03:43 AM »
Major Chadwick:

He was asked if the story were true that there were always seven Jnanis living about the Hill.  'There may be even more than
that,' He told us, 'who can tell?  How to recognize them? They may appear as beggars lying in a ditch or in some other
unrecognizable capacity.  It is impossible to say.'

*

Sri Bhagavan always discouraged any devotee going Mounam or taking a vow of silence. During the war i decided  that
I would like to do so, chiefly to protect myself from the jibes of others.  I went and asked Bhagavan's permission.  He was
not enthusiastic and told me that it was useless to keep the tongue still but to continue to write messages on bits of paper,
which so many so called mounis continue to do.  In this way only the tongue had a rest but the mind continued just as before.
I said that I had no intention of doing this but would throw my pencil and paper away.  I felt that I had obtained a reluctant
consent as Bhagavan agreed that people were worrying me. So I made the necessary  arrangements, installed  a bell from
my room to the kitchen so I should not have to call my servant, and fixed a lucky day to begin.  The night before I was to
start, a friend of mine brought the subject in the Hall after the evening meal when only a few of us were present.  Bhagavan
showed immediately showed His disapproval and said it was unnecessary and in fact not a good thing at all.  I did not talk
much anyhow.  It was better to speak only when it was necessary, that it actually did no good to observe silence, that if one
did so for twelve years one became dumb and might obtain some thaumaturgic powers, but who wanted them?  Speech acted
as a safety valve.  Naturally after this talk, I gave up the idea.

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #291 on: September 06, 2013, 11:49:46 AM »
Silent Power - Kunju Swami:

Bhagavan was always very considerate towards His devotees in all matters.  When He was living at Skandasramam on the
eastern slopes of the Hill, He used to wake up at 8 O'clock in the morning.  He would not get up immediately but recline
on the bed.  We too would wake up at the same time and sit in meditation near Him.  Bhagavan's Mother used to sing some
devotional songs from within.  Bhagavan's routine was to go out at half past four and return by fire.  We would then begin to
recite the Aksharamana Malai. That was the only song which Bhagavan had composed at that time.  I learned it by heart by
merely listening to the chanting by other devotees. The recitation was over by six o' clock which was the time for Bhagavan
to go for His bath.

There was a large flat stone at the spot where now there is a low wall on the eastern side.  Tooth powder and water were
kept for Bhagavan's use.  In all weathers, He used to sit on it facing east and clean His teeth.  His body was glowing in the rays
pf the rising sun.  If there was heavy due, we tried to dissuade Him from sitting there, but without any success.  Nor did He tell
us the reason for sitting always there.  It was sometime afterwards that we came to know of it.

An old man named Sowbhagyathammal, living in a house near the foot of the Hill, and some of her friends made it a daily
practice not take any food until they had darshan of Bhagavan and Sri Seshadri Swami.  They used to come up to Skandasramam
everyday for this purpose.  One day Sowbhagyathammal did not come. If any of His regular devotees were absent on a
particular day, Bhagavan never failed to make inquiries and find out the reason.  So when the old woman came the next day,
He asked her why she did not come on the previous day. She replied, 'I had Sri Bhagavan's darshan yesterday.'  'But you
did not come yesterday', said Bhagavan.  'Bhagavan knew that this humble devotee was too feeble to climb the Hill and so he made
it possible for her to see Him from a place close to her house', was the reply.  She explained that she had seen Bhagavan while
He was sitting on the stone and cleaning His teeth and said that she was henceforth going to have His darshan everyday in the same
way.  From that time onwards, Bhagavan made it a practice to sit on that stone for nearly half an hour daily!  Later on when
Bhagavan took up His abode at the foot of the Hill it was also chiefly out of consideration for His aged devotees who found it
to climb to Skandasramam.  After passing away of His Mother, He occasionally came down to Her Samadhi. Aged devotees eagerly
awaited these opportunities to see Him.  And so when they begged Him to remain below, He began to live permanently.

contd.,

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #292 on: September 07, 2013, 01:09:33 PM »

Major Chadwick:

He was also against people taking Sannyasa.  If properly kept, it was a useless tie.  If not properly kept, it condemned itself.
After all, it is only one think, 'now I am a Sannaysin', instead of of 'now I am in the world'.   Thought went on and that was
the chief enemy.  About retiring to the forest, or shutting oneself up in a cave, He expressed the same views.  So He obviously
endorsed living in the world as itself the necessary environment for helping a person along in his Sadhana.  If one could do this,
be in the world, but not of the world, one had achieved a high sate of detachment.  It is always better to have some sort of
opposition, the tree that is not buffeted by the winds is usually a weakling.

One day someone remarked to Bhagavan, 'There are many things that happen here of which Bhagavan cannot approve.
Why does He remain here?  He has not ties or desires.'

'What can I do?' asked Bhagavan. 'If I go off to the forest and try to hide, what will happen?  They will soon find me out.  Then
someone will put up a hut in front of me and another person at the back of me, and it will not be long before, huts will have
sprung up on either side.  Where can I go? I shall always be a prisoner.'

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #293 on: September 07, 2013, 01:49:02 PM »
Silent Power - Kunju Swami:

It was the practice of Bhagavan's devotees to take His permission before proceeding to circumambulate the Hill and to prostrate
before Him on their return.  Many came to the Asramam all the way from the town for this purpose even late in the evening and then
proceeded immediately to their houses in the town.  Bhagavan advised such devotees to break their circumambulation in town
in the evening and to complete it on the following day when came to the Asramam as usual.

When women devotees were ready to return to town at dusk He would always make certain that none of them were alone.
If any of them found no company He would ask some male member to go with her and leave her at her house.

There were some devotees employed in Madras who used to come every weekend to Tiruvannamalai and return to Madras in time
to go to their offices on Monday morning.  Sometimes some of them were so reluctant to part from Bhagavan that they continued
overstay their time.  They would go as far as the railway station only to return to the Asramam on some pretext or other.  Bhagavan
therefore, used in such cases to send someone with them to the railway station and see that they actually got into the train
and left for Madras.  He did not like that anyone should neglect his duties.

When a devotee came late in the evening after everyone had taken his meal, and gone to bed, he was not allowed to go hungry
on this account.  Bhagavan always saw to it that some food was kept for such late-comers and that they had their meal.  When
such a visitor arrived,  Bhagavan simply looked at some of us.  That was enough for us to take him to the dining hall and give him
the meal !

Bhagavan never started to eat before all those who were present were served.  The beggars waiting at the gate are even now
given food before the inmates and visitors are served.  No exception is made to this rule even on crowded occasions like the
Jayanti and the Aradhana.  All these instances will show how considerate Bhagavan was to others !

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Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #294 on: September 07, 2013, 04:32:34 PM »
8th August, 1946 (55) GURI (CONCENTRATION) ALONE IS THE GURU (THE PRECEPTOR)

Yesterday morning Yogi Ramiah questioned Bhagavan thus: “Swami, some disciples of Sai Baba worship a picture of him and say that it is their Guru: How could that be?
They can worship it as God, but what benefit could they get by worshipping it as their Guru?” Bhagavan replied, “They secure concentration by that.” The Yogi said, “That is all very well, I agree. It may be to some extent a sadhana in concentration. But isn’t a Guru required for that concentration?”
“Certainly, but after all, Guru only means guri, concentration” said Bhagavan. The Yogi said, “How can a lifeless picture help in developing deep concentration? It requires a living Guru who could show it in practice. It is possible perhaps for Bhagavan to attain perfection without a living Guru but is it possible for people like myself?”
That is true. Even so, by worshipping a lifeless portrait the mind gets concentrated to a certain extent. That concentration will not remain constant unless one
knows one’s own Self by enquiring. For that enquiry, a Guru’s help is necessary. That is why the ancients say that the enquiry should not stop with mere initiation. However, even if it does, the initiation will not be without benefit. It will bear fruit some time or other. But there should be no ostentation in this initiation. If the mind is pure, all this will bear fruit; otherwise, it goes to waste like a seed sown in barren soil,” said Bhagavan
.
I don’t know, Swami. You may say that a hundred times or a thousand times. To be sure of one’s own progress, a living Guru like you is required. How can we give the status of a Guru to a lifeless portrait?” he said. With a smile on his face, Bhagavan said, “Yes, yes,” nodding his head and then kept silent. Brother, all I can say is that that smile and that silence were radiant with knowledge and wisdom. How can I describe it?

Letters from Sri Ramanasramam-By suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #295 on: September 08, 2013, 01:46:37 PM »
Major Chadwick:

In this respect, the following story is an amusing illustration.  One day, years ago, Bhagavan decided to have a day's fast.
He intended to wander about the Hill of which He knew every inch, having explored it as a young man.  So He took a rather
larger meal than usual the previous night to keep Himself going. He set off alone in the early morning, but He had not gone
very far when seven women met Him.  'Oh, here is our Swami', they cried out delightfully.  The made Him sit down and
proceeded to serve Him a full meal which they seemed to have brought on purpose.  When He had finished they departed
saying, 'We will come and bring Swami His mid-day meal', and in some extraordinary way, they did find Him though He
had followed no beaten track, to avoid them.   They again served Him a large meal.

Bhagavan made His way home feeling He had eaten far more than was good for Him.  M.V. Ramaswamy Iyer, a very old
disciple living in the town  had heard that Bhagavan was going to have day's fast, and decided that by the evening He would
be hungry, so He cooked a sumptuous meal and went out to meet Bhagavan whom He encountered on the outskirts of the town.
Here He made Him sit down again and eat and would not spare Him, so Bhagavan returned home gorged, saying that He would
never spend a day fasting again.  With regard to the seven women who had met Him so mysteriously, Bhagavan suggested that
they must  be fairies and not simple coolies who had come to pick dry leaves, figs and broken tree branches.

yAdumAhi ninRAi kALi engum nee niRainthAi.....  (Bharati)

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #296 on: September 08, 2013, 02:50:18 PM »
Silent Power -  N.N. Rajan:

I

Miracles and Bhagavan:

It is common to see people flock to those who exhibit occult powers and perform miracles like curing ailments, floating on water,
sitting buried, under earth etc, but Self-realization and miracle mongering are poles apart.  The Jnani does not care for miracles.
To the Jnani, the control of the senses leading to realization of the Self is the only aim. This is really the greatest miracle, and
to achieve it is the Jnani's goal.

The great Jnani that he was, Bhagavan Sri Ramana always reveled in the natural state of supreme bliss. He did not wish to
perform miracles. In fact, he warned people against it.  This does not mean that he had no powers.  He had them in abundance,
as witnessed by many, only Bhagavan never liked to exhibit them.

He behaved as any ordinary man would do.  Regarding the manifestation of powers seen by devotees, it might be due to His
infinite compassion that the miracles happened and He might not have been particularly intent on them.

One evening, while I was sitting outside Sri Bhagavan's Hall, just in His view, suddenly I noticed an expressive gesture in His
face, as He leaned forward from His reclining position. It looked as though He was calling me to say something.  I was impelled
to respond to the gesture by getting up and going near Him, but He did not tell me anything.   I resumed my seat only to find.,
in a couple of minutes, another jerk and a similar expressive movement in Him as before.  This time also I was so stirred and
when I went nearer there was no further indication.  I  took my seat again  but now became restless.  I could not resist the
urge to leave the place at once, with the expectation of some urgent matter demanding my presence.  I prostrated to Sri
Bhagavan and I left the Hall without a word.

A major train accident had happened at my head quarters station about nine miles off. I had been forewarned by Sri
Bhagavan in a strange manner as recorded above and due to His Grace, I was free from the blame of not being on the spot
in the emergency. Obviously, Bhagavan's  warning was quite in advance of the actual happening.  The way He did it is most
noteworthy.  There was no public demonstration or publicity.  An act of grace to a devotee, in His own unique way and with no
means of others knowing that a miracle was actually performed.  This is typical of our Bhagavan.

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #297 on: September 10, 2013, 10:07:19 AM »

Major Chadwick:

Someone said one day to Sri Bhagavan, 'Is it true that the Jnani is conscious in all the three states, even when he is sleeping?

'Yes', replied Sri Bhagavan.

'Then why does Bhagavan snore?"

Sri Bhagavan replied, 'Yes I know that I snore, I could stop it if I wished, but I like it!'

Is this not perfect acceptance?



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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #298 on: September 10, 2013, 10:19:33 AM »
Silent Power:  N. N. Rajan:

An old teacher of Sri Bhagavan came to see Him.  He was 87 and very feeble.  Nevertheless an overmastering desire to see
the God-man whom he had once taught in the second form, urged him on Tiruvannamalai.  In Sri Bhagavan's presence, he recalled
an incident from that time with great emotion.  Once he had asked young Venkararaman to stand up on the bench for a minor
misdemeanor. But Venkataraman gazed him for a while with such steadiness and power that his  (teacher's) will withered rapidly
and he reversed his decision.

It was a touching sight to see the old teacher meet his Seer-pupil.  Then the teacher asked Sri Bhagavan whether He recognized
him.  Sri Bhagavan broadly smiled and graciously answered: 'Why not?'  The teacher was visibly moved at this and he again
asked Sri Bhagavan about His health.  Sri Bhagavan replied that He was feeling alright.  Throughout this very moving but  short
interview Maharshi displayed such graciousness and cordiality that neither the old teacher nor those who were close by felt
that there was anything wrong with the Maharshi.   

These things make us feel that Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi is a perfect divine incarnation, whose divine excellence was
lying dormant till He left His home.

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #299 on: September 10, 2013, 11:42:07 AM »
Subramanian,
The Story of Sri Bhagavan and his teacher!So typical of our Bhagavan-always Gracious and simple.

Namaskar.