Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 199218 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #270 on: August 29, 2013, 09:46:40 AM »
Major Chadwick:

One day, when someone was talking of doing this and that, Bhagavan asked, 'Why do you think that you are the doer?
There lies all the trouble.  It is quite absurd, as it is obvious to all that 'I' does nothing.  It is only the body that acts.
'I' is always the witness.  We so associate ourselves with thoughts and actions that we continually say, 'I did this or that',
when we did nothing at all. Concentrate on being the Witness and let things take their course, they will go on anyhow,
you cannot prevent them.'

That is the point!  Things will go on anyhow, but Sri Bhagavan taught that though we had no power  to stop them, we did
have the power to observe them from a detached point of view, as the Witness and not as the doer.  That was the purpose
of life, and Sadhana consisted exactly in that.

Bearing directly on the above let me quote from Devaraja Mudaliar's "My Recollections." :

'The only freedom man has is to strive for acquire the Jnana which well enable him not to identify himself with the body.
The body will go through the actions rendered inevitable by prarabdha and man is free to identity himself with the body
and be attached to the fruits of his actions, or to be detached from it and a mere Witness of its activities.'

***

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #271 on: August 29, 2013, 10:41:00 AM »
Silent Power:

SEIN

continues....

This abundant affection for the boy did not in any way prevent Maharshi from being strict with him.  The following incident
makes it clear that Sri Bhagavan gave the boy a practical lesson which till now he has not forgotten.

At Skandasramam lived a monkey named Nondi, which was the pet of all.  Maharshi ordered that whatever food was
served to His followers should also be served to the monkey, and in case it was absent elsewhere, then its share should
be kept separate for its return.  In such a case, the food would be kept near a window inside the cave and the shutter closed
but not bolted.  This was the custom. 

On one of his personal visits to the Asramam one day, the boy had enjoyed the sweet dishes served to the devotees.  He
had a little more than the usual share.  The monkey being absent, its share was kept near the closed window.  The boy,
having had his share, went up to the window and began to eat out of the monkey's as well.  Suddenly, the monkey came and
opened the window only to see the boy eating its share.  It gave the boy a blow on his cheek.  Shocked and terrified the boy
cried out and devotees tried to console him. Sri Bhagavan came to the spot, understood the situation and told the boy:  'You
deserve it.  Why did you want his (monkey's) share?  You had enough already. You ought to have  been contented with that.'
Instead of appeasing the beloved child, Bhagavan put him right.  The boy became silent and heeded Sri Bhagavan's words.

'Do not touch the property of others. Be content with what you have.  Share equally what you have. Divide it with one and all
around you.  Help the needy.  Be not blind when a wrong is committed to before you.  Correct it if possible, or at least speak
out for the right.'  These are some of the golden rules of the Maharshi that day.

That blessed boy is Swami Ramanananda (Sri T. N. Venkataraman, former President of Sri Ramanasramam, the only descendant
of the Maharshi's family.)

****

Arunachala Siva.
             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #272 on: August 30, 2013, 10:20:16 AM »
Major Chadwick:

Sri Bhagavan was never strong, at least not after about thirty years of age.  This was no doubt owing to the strain He inflicted
on His body in the early years  in Tiruvannamalai.  For years, He suffered from asthma and a photograph taken at Skandasramam
shows Him as little more than a skeleton.  Suddenly after fifteen years, for no apparent reason, the asthma left Him almost entirely,
He told me.  But He was always liable to bad colds and had frequent digestive trouble.  Later, He had more and more difficulty
in walking. Innumerable oils were tried and He was massaged morning and evening, but with little effect.

One early morning in April 1942, when Sri Bhagavan was returning from His walk, on the Hill after breakfast, He had a nasty
accident.  One of His favorite squirrels ran across His path as He was descending the stone steps near the Asramam dispensary.
The squirrel was being chased by the Asramam dog who was in full pursuit. Sri Bhagavan pushed forward His stick in front of the
dog to try to delay it, slipped and fell down the steps and broke His collar bone.  This naturally caused a lot of pain.  He was
treated by a local bone-setter and was entirely cured within two weeks, but, while it lasted, it was a most anxious time for
all of us.

In 1947, He was given some medicine for His rheumatism but it had little effect except to bring on a violent attack of hiccups
which lasted for many days and the doctor seemed quite incapable of relieving it.  This should never have occurred as the
medicine jacket warned that the patient mus be carefully watched  for such reactions.  But though afterwards Bhagavan noticed
that His urine had become very yellow, and this had been one of the principal symptoms to be looked for, nobody had noticed it.
We were all much alarmed at the time, but at last the attack subsided of its own accord.  While it lasted the Asramam was in a high   
state of tension as well we all felt quite helpless to do anything.

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #273 on: August 30, 2013, 10:38:11 AM »
Silent Power - Dr. V. Srinivasa Rao:

Among the foremost devotees, Dr. V. Srinivasa Rao found in Sri Bhagavan the greatest solace and support in his life.
He was born in the former native state of Pudukkottai and is happily still with us at the age of eighty seven. (1972).
He was intimately associated with the growth of the Asramam for many decades. Childlike by nature and outspoken,
his sincerity and frankness gained him easy access and familiarity with Sri Bhagavan who treated him like a pet child.

Born poor and orphaned when hardly four years old, he grew up to be self reliant.  He took his degree in medicine and
surgery, and prompted by good wishes of he doyen of his days, Dr. Singaravelu Mudaliar, he entered the government
service. He was medical officer in several district head quarters hospitals and retired in 1940 as the superintendent of
the Royapettah Hospital, Madras.   After this he spent a good deal of his time in the Asramam in a life of devotion and
services to Sri Bhagavan. 

To begin with Dr. Srinivasa Rao had no interest in a spiritual life and seemed more an agnostic, if not a down right atheist.
Through the friendship of spiritually evolved people like Sri S. Doraiswami Iyer, one of the oldest devotees, he came to
Sri Bhagavan.  Before taking leave of Sri Bhagavan he asked Him, 'Will I come again for your darsan?' Sri Bhagavan with
a tender and compassionate look patted him on the shoulder saying, 'What will happen is sure to happen.'  That was all!
He felt somehow thrilled in the core of his being by His touch and the gracious reply which strengthened his faith and surrender.
Since then remembrance of Sri Bhagavan was constant.

Sri Bhagavan directed his attention specifically to Upadesa Saram among His works and emphasized ekachintana (fixing the
mind on one thought -- of the One) as essential for the mind to get free of thoughts; and that constant remembrance of God is
better than a recital of hymns or silent invocation.   On one occasion he told Sri Bhagavan, 'It is said that one should contemplate
on God Vishnu from head to foot.  Is that the correct thing to do?'  Sri Bhagavan reminded him the efficacy of Rama Japa and the
like and asked Sri Bhagavan, 'Why not do Ramana Japa instead of Rama Japa?' to which Sri Bhagavan gave His assent.

contd.,

Arunachala "Siva.   
           

Ravi.N

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Re:Sri Bhagavan and Annamalai swami
« Reply #274 on: August 31, 2013, 09:57:30 AM »
In the mid 1940s,when Bhagavan began to find it difficult to walk,Arumugam and I levelled and cleared the path on which Bhagavan usually took his daily walk.The path ran through the ashram to palakottu and then back to the ashram via the lower slopes of the hill.To make a smooth surface we put mud on the path and covered it with soft sand.We also installed a tall stone at a place where there was a break in the slope so that bhagavan could hold on to it while he was climbing.The path needed occasional maintenance because the herds of goats which roamed around the lower slopes of the hill frequently kicked thorny twigs onto it.One day,as I was walking along this path,I noticed several new thorns.I took a branch from a nearby tree and swept the path clean.
That night,when I went to the ashram for darshan,Bhagavan asked me,'who cleared that path?'
I told him that I had decided to clean it because I had noticed some thorns while I was out for a walk.
Bhagavan then asked me rather sharply,'Why are you reflecting on this act which you have done?'(I recall swami telling me this story-it seems Sri Bhagavan said-Oh!nee pannayO! meaning -Oh!you did it!-Ravi)
I immediately understood that Bhagavan was trying to tell me that I should not have the idea,'I have done this service for Bhagavan'.I was not aware that I was dwelling on this thought but Bhagavan must have seen it in my mind.
'You can see my mind.I was not aware that I was thinking,"I have done this".I just cleared the path because I didn't want Bhagavan to tread on any thorns.'
Bhagavan responded by saying,"If you do not look back at the actsthat you have done,a lot of benefits will accrue to you.'
Bhaavan still seemed to be suggesting that I was consciously dwelling on the act so I told him again,'Bhagavan knows that I was not consciously thinking,"I did this job"'.
Then I quoted a verse by Thayumanavar:O God,you know my mind,you know my actions.If,inspite of this,you chase me away from you,I shall have many troubles.'
(உள்ளம் அறிவாய் உழப்பறிவாய் நான்ஏழை
தள்ளிவிடின் மெத்தத் தவிப்பேன் பராபரமே. Verse 33 of parApara kaNNi-Ravi)
Bhagavan smiled at my quote ad didn't pursue the matter any further.

Living by The words of Bhagavan by David Godman

I have to say that Swami completely won him(bhagavan) over by this simple devotion.The ParApara kaNNi of Thayumanavar is a moving one and Swami was quite on the dot in quoting this paticular verse-Having heard swami reciting this in a spirit of saranagathi,Bhagavan simply accepted it!Saranagathi is the Brahmastram that a devotee weilds!


Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #275 on: August 31, 2013, 09:59:43 AM »
Major Chadwick:

Sri Bhagavan's reactions to mad people were negative and at times disapproving.  Where we expected pity we found no
such thing.  It seemed, by the way Bhagavan spoke of them, that He considered that it was their own fault, that it was,
in fact, just lack of control, and if they really wanted to to they could pull themselves together and act normally.  Bhagavan
never said any of this, it is only my personal feeling on the subject.

There was one lady who spent sometime at the Asramam and thought herself a very great devotee, who entirely shut her
eyes so that she could not see and so be distracted by the wicked world, at the same time observing silence, hoping in this
way, to quiet the senses.  All that Bhagavan said was, 'Why does she not come over here and join us like other people?
What good s all this going to do? She comes here to be with us and then shuts herself away.'

Another woman, a Jewess, who had undergone dreadful Nazi persecution in Germany used to strip off all her clothes and appears
naked in pubic, have hysterical fits, scream and seem beyond all control.  Bhagavan was very cold about her antics and hardly
seemed interested.  Though He did make make some inquiry, when the police took her away and ask what had become of her,
He showed no apparent sympathy with her ravings.

****

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #276 on: August 31, 2013, 10:18:02 AM »

Silent Power - Dr. V. Srinivasa Rao:

Afer 1940, Srinivasa Rao had the unique opportunity of staying in the proximity  of Sri Bhagavan rendering some personal
service or other.  He treasures the privilege he had of massaging Sri Bhagavan's limbs and of ministering  Him during His'
bodily ailments as a doctor.  His simple but total love and attachment to Sri Bhagavan's person generated many happy incidents..
Once Sri Bhagavan's knee caps and legs did not function owing to stiffness and Srinivasa Rao with folded hands implore Him
to permit his massaging for a few days only.  Sri Bhagavan would not agree saying, 'If allowed to do so, you will continue endlessly.'
But he beseched Him like a child and Sri Bhagavan yieleded but said it would be strictly for ten days.  Sri Bhagavan was counting
the days and on the last day, when Srinivasa Rao was actually massaging His legs, Sri T.P.R's father who arrived just then
entered the Hall and perceiving the doctor massaging the legs of Sri Bhagavan repeated a Sanskrit sloka and exclaimed, 'Oh, Raoji,
do not give up what  you are doing. You need not do any other Sadhana for your salvation.'

Sri Bhagavan burst out laughing and said, 'Well well, I have been counting these days and waiting for this last day and you
have come to recommend continuance!'  Leaving his massaging, the doctor stepped before Sri Bhagavan and went on doing
obeisance imploring Him to listen to the elderly gentleman if not to him.  Sri Bhagavan yielded for another ten days!

During the two years preceding Sri Bhagavan's Mahanirvana the doctor gave whole time attention and assistance to Sri
Bhagavan's health and comfort in collaboration with the team of medical men who devoutly rendered service  during the
last illness.

He happily spent his days remembering Sri Bhagavan and his memorable days with Him and deriving all the solace needed
from His writiings and utterances, which he revered.

****

Arunachala Siva.               
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #277 on: August 31, 2013, 03:14:48 PM »
At the feet of Bhagavan:  Deepavali Darsan - T.K. Sundaresa Iyer:

Bhagavan in His embodied state occupied our whole heart, being dear to us as father, mother, God and Guru, all in one.
We were loath to leave His Presence, be it night or day.  We slept outside the Old Hall, and Bhagavan was always visible 
to us on the sofa from wherever we were.

On night prior to Deepavali in 1929, the first year of my settling down in the Asramam, Sri Bhagavan suggested my going
back home for the 'Ganga bath' (Ganga SnAnam). To me, why to all of us, the very sight of Bhagavan is a bath in the Ganga,
the sight of Bhagavan is the worship of Siva, the sight of Bhagavan is the fulfillment of every ritual and practice of all austerities.
Yet, I did not want to go against the mandate of Sri Bhagavan as I went home, late in the night.  I was impatient to be back
with Bhagavan, so I woke up my wife and children even at 2 a.m. finished the ceremonial Ganga SnAnam, and hastened to His
blessed Presence.

Bhagavan lay reclining on the sofa. It was about 3.30 a.m. I made the usual prostration and sat down by the sofa.  All of a sudden
an aura was visible around the head of Sri Bhagavan!  It was like the glory with clusters of evenly arranged flames, just as we
see around  the deities in our temple processions.  Sri Bhagavan's face shone with beaming smiles.  It appeared to me that on this
occasion, Bhagavan was giving darsan of Sri Nataraja, the Lord of Cosmic Dance.  In my ecstasy, I think, I must have sung hymns
from Tevaram, which I love dearly as the Vedas.   The vision lasted for an hour, and then the glory vanished.

At 4 a.m. Bhagavan sat up for His pan-supari.  I related to Him what I had seen and Bhagavan gave a beaming smile.

*****

Arunachala Siva.           

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #278 on: August 31, 2013, 04:46:27 PM »
There was an aristocratic lady from America who sent a telegram stating that she was coming to India just to be with Bhagavan. She also said that she was reaching Mumbai by ship on a particular date, and then taking the train to Chennai. She had also written that she would be taking a special train (which was available in those days) and coming to Arunachala on a particular date. She sent another telegram from Mumbai confirming her program. She sent another telegram from Chennai. She was disappointed that there was no one to receive her at the station when she arrived. Once again at the entrance of Ramanashram there was no one to receive her. She came into the hall on her own. Bhagavan was reading the newspaper and she couldn‘t even see his face. Chadwick and Munagala Venkataramaiya had been asked to look after her since she was coming from such a great distance and was making a special trip. She was fuming at the treatment that she received.

She said, I am a lady. What have I done wrong? I have taken all the correct steps and come here. Nobody gives me any respect here, and this Ramana Maharshi doesn‘t even look at me.‘ She was terribly angry. She told the two devotees, Come to my salon at four o‘clock. I want to talk to you.‘ She left the ashram abruptly. When they went to her place, she demanded, Who is this Ramana Maharshi? He does not even have common courtesy. What did I do wrong? I did everything perfectly but he does not know how to respect or even receive a lady.‘ They said, Do not talk ill about our master. We will go and report everything to him.‘ She said, That is the reason why I am saying it. Go and tell him. Let him learn something.‘ The two, with great feeling, reported the incident to Bhagavan. Bhagavan listened with great interest and coaxed them to tell all the details by asking questions like, Then what did she say?‘ He seemed very curious to have a detailed account. Finally he assumed his usual poise and said, Did she say all this? Then it will work itself out.‘ That night, at Chennai, the lady had a dream. In the dream, Bhagavan said, Come back.‘ The next day she returned, but this time unannounced. From 8:00 onwards, Bhagavan‘s eyes were at the entrance to the hall. She came at 10:00 and Bhagavan showered her with his smile. She became such a beautiful devotee of Bhagavan! We can never judge a master or how he will act. From his action, you cannot decide anything.

 

(Human Gospel)
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #279 on: September 01, 2013, 10:40:04 AM »
Major Chadwick:

A young man from Mysore, sat in front of Sri Bhagavan for months, apparently in deep meditation.  Bhagavan almost appeared
antagonistic to him, so much so, that someone asked him, why?  Bhagavan replied that the young man was only meditating for
a job as he was out of work, and this proved to be true.  The youth was actually offered employment in local school, as he had
a degree in science but had by then gone so crazy that he ignored it.  His idea of job now seemed to take place of Bhagavan
Himself.  It was very dangerous to misuse Bhagavan's power and a thing which Bhagavan always opposed.  This youth finished
up by trying to jump onto Bhagavan's couch and embrace Him, calling out, 'Father, Father!' and thus hoped to gain power directly,

But many mad people were brought to the Asramam with the hope that Bhagavan would cure them.  Although this was against
the Asramam rules, they would be smuggled into the Hall when no one was looking.  In some cases, the visit did prove effective,
but in all cases Bhagavan appeared completely indifferent.

Bhagavan did reciprocate the grief of others in most cases, and speak some comforting words, though when a person has lost
control He would be stern and apparently unsympathetic.  With people who are ill, He would  sympathize, and in certain cases even
offer advice and help them in any way possible. 

Once He unexpectedly came to visit me when I was lying sick in my room.  He had been to Devaraja Mudaliar's place so as to
be the first to enter a new room he had just built and was told that I was unwell and would be delighted if He paid me a surprise
visit.  He immediately complied.  Therefore, the mystery of His behavior in the case of mad people becomes all the greater.  He
was sympathetic by nature to one and all, so this once exception remains somewhat of a riddle.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #280 on: September 01, 2013, 10:55:13 AM »
Silent Power - Marie B. Byles

Television once showed a picture of a man lying on his back on a bed of nails with two planks across him and a tractor or
some such thing being driven over him on the two planks.  At one time a wheel slipped of the plank  and went over his body.
As he stood up the interviewer asked him how he did it and how he felt.  He said that he put his faith in Almighty God and that he
felt okay.  Another film showed a man chewing up wine glasses and saying that he enjoyed eating them.

I cannot vouch personally for those two happenings. But it does seem to me that such strange and seemingly impossible things
do occur with certain unusually gifted people, and that science is beginning to take notice of them and sometimes gives sceintific
explanations.

There are also the strange workings of astrology and psycho kinesis -- as when a tensed hand is held over a compass and swings
the needle in the opposite direction and and extra sensory perceptions -- and when the the details of the sinking of S.S. Titanic
were perceived thousands of miles away at the same time that it happened.  And most envied of all miracles of healing both
physical and mental.  There have been always many such healers.  One of the best known is Agnes Sanford who wrote the
well known Healing Light.  And a less known mental healer was the American Buddhist monk, Sumangalo, who unexpectedly
found he had suddenly acquired the ability to cure mental disorders.  Among these apparent miracle workers we must place
those gifted preachers who have the power to convert people from delinquency and drug addiction. 

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #281 on: September 02, 2013, 09:41:00 AM »

Major Chadwick:

Many people consider it most auspicious to handle anything that their Guru has touched intimately.  Old ladies would
wait outside the bathroom to sip the water running from Sri Bhagavan's bath, or the water on the ground left after
He had washed His feet on returning from the stroll.  So it was considered especially blessed to eat from a leaf that
Sri Bhagavan had already used for His meal.  But Bhagavan Himself was dead against such things and did His best to
discourage them.  It was the habit in the Asramam for each person to remove his own leaf after he had eaten, with,
of course, the exception of Sri Bhagavan.  But one of the attendants was responsible to see that this was thrown
away without anybody being allowed to get hold of it.  I know for fact that if the attendant had not already had his own
meal, he would have it served on Bhagavan's leaf.  But Bhagavan was not aware of this or there would have been trouble.

One day Bhagavan noticed a young girl hanging around and watching Him eating.  She obviously was waiting for something.
Eventually He asked the doting parents, who were watching with admiration, what it was all about.  They explained that she
was waiting for His leaf from which to her own meal.

Bhagavan was very angry. So as a punishment to all who had allowed such things to happen, He said that He would remove
His own leaf and throw it outside, so that no one might get hold of it.  Everybody was upset at this, one reason being that by
then Bhagavan's rheumatism was so bad that to try and carry His leaf and at the same time support Himself with His stick
would render Him unable to hold the rail at the side of the steep steps that led out of the dining room. But Bhagavan was
adamant.

To save the situation, a lady devotee said that she would herself be responsible for seeing that Bhagavan's leaf was removed
without anybody being allowed to handle this. This Bhagavan would not first allow, for why make an exception in His case?
So a compromise was reached.  In future, all leaves were to be left in the dining room and were to be together removed by
one of the servants. At first the lady said that she herself would do it, but the servant soon took her place and this custom
persists to this day.

(Once Muruganar wanted to take food on the left over leaf of Sri Bhagavan. But someone prevented it saying that the food
sent by Mudaliar Patti ( a  non brahmin) had been served there. Muruganar composed a beautiful verse on this incident.
It is in Sri Ramana Sannidhi Murai -   "thachariyAtha chaturmaRai parpAn....." )

Arunachala Siva.         

     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #282 on: September 02, 2013, 11:15:03 AM »
Silent Power - Marie B. Byles:

continues....

Let us then admit that these super normal happenings are factual, and also that science is becoming increasingly interested,
so that we may well expect a widening of our knowledge.

The question we need to consider is whether it will make any difference in our social well being if there are people trained to
eat glass or even to cure people of drug addiction and delinquency.  No super normal talent in itself implies simple goodness
and compassion which alone can bring about more harmonious relations between man and nature. True, some religious books
assume the goodness of the healer and other miracle workers, and assume that no one can be a saint unless her performs
miracles.  But are miracles any different from other super normal happenings?  Does what you call it make any difference? Those
who now walk on fire for the edification of tourists, admits that it does not mean the same for them as it did when they performed
the same act for the glory of God.  But the fact remains that they outwardly achieve the same result as when they did do it for
the glory of God.  Those who examine these super normal happenings from the scientific angle assume that the mortal goodness
of the doer has nothing to do with the matter.

And indeed -- why should we think that goodness or badness in the doer is important?  After all the world is composed of and
founded on pairs of opposites.  Therefore we cannot have white magic without black magic too, any more than we can have a
positive without a negative.  It is therefore obvious that a person who performs, say, a miracle of healing is not necessarily a
good man or woman.  For this reason it may or may not be the individual who performs it.  It is not of any importance.  The only
thing that matters is whether it springs from love and compassion which alone can draw us above the pairs of opposites.  To read
of those who performed no miracles, but did achieve this love and compassion is far more likely to be helpful and inspiring to
ordinary people like ourselves.


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #283 on: September 03, 2013, 09:32:08 AM »
Major Chadwick:


An American lady who was traveling about in India in the cause of birth-control, came to visit the Asramam. She asked
Sri Bhagavan if birth control were not a good thing seeing the world was rapidly becoming over populated, especially
India where already there was not enough food to go around.  Bhagavan only smiled.

'How do you hope to control of life when you cannot control death?' He asked, 'Find out rather who it is who is born
now?'

Again this same sort of reply was made when someone asked with regard to death penalty, if it was not evil to kill
somebody deliberately, even though done by the state.   He hoped for some pronouncement from Bhagavan, but was
sadly disappointed. 

'If a person is going to die he will die whatever happens, you cannot prevent it.  He may walk across the road and be
killed by a car. Anyhow die he will.'

Bhagavan never passed judgement on anything, not even on the death penalty.  As I have previously stated, there
was no good or bad for Him, only actions and attachment to actions.  Know the actor and rest there, then all else had
absolutely no importance.                   

***

Arunachala Siva.



Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #284 on: September 03, 2013, 10:25:25 AM »
Silent Power - Marie B. Byles:

Foremost among such ordinary people of whose thoughts we have written record is the saintly Stoic emperor of Rome,
in the second century,  Marcus Aurelius, who kept a record of his meditations.  And that simple record has been the inspiration
of millions of all over the world.  And yet he had no outstanding talents.  He had only simple goodness and kindness, springing
from compassionate love and understanding of the oneness of all creation.

And another such was the simple Carmelite monk, Brother Lawrence of the 17th century, who  performed no miracles except what
the Buddha would call the only real miracle, that of a transformed life.  He accomplished this merely by turning his mind to God and doing
nothing but for the love of God.  His whole being radiated serenity and love, and without any intellectual explanations his example
transformed the lives of many.

Of course we must all use the talents we have been given and do the work that falls to our lot -- being the emperor of a mighty
empire, a cook in a monastery kitchen, performer miracles or healer of the sick.  None is superior or inferior, and talents do not
count.  The way to compassion and enlightenment is the same for all.

We cannot and should not want to acquire supernatural powers we do not already possess, nor scientific knowledge beyond
our normal capacity, nor even an inclination to harness these supernatural happenings or miracles.  There are always specialists
dealing with their particular fields.   But we each have a built-in-computer, as it were, which collects what is necessary for us,.
according to our talents, if only we will let it work freely unimpeded by our predilections.  One of the best ways of letting it work
is to repeat in thought, or if possible in a whisper, what the Hindus call a mantra, suited to one's individuality.  Brother Lawrence's
practice of the presence of God is a perfect example, for he would do nothing except for love of God.  By this means our whole
being tends to get turned in with Cosmic Laws and the harmony of the universe, whether we know them clearly or not.

Thus our individual talents get utilized by the internal computer and get directed as migratory birds and fishes are.  Then
whatever our talent, whether to perform operations without anaesthetics like the Philippine healers, or merely wash dishes.
our work will be well done.

Therefore let us read and learn whatever  is helpful , but let us not be bewildered by or crave for super normal powers. Let
us be content with the Inner Light that has been given to us remembering that the greatest of Masters like Buddha, Sri
Ramakrishna and Sri Ramana Maharshi have decried the craving for and display of super normal powers as utterly detrimental
to one's spiritual enlightenment.

***

Arunachala Siva.