Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201239 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #255 on: August 23, 2013, 11:05:54 AM »
Lt. Col. Karamchandani:

The extraordinary privilege of attending on Bhagavan Sri Maharshi during the last two months came to me rather unexpectedly
and without any planning on my part.

About fifteen years ago, while was working in Tiruchy, a friend from North India wrote to me asking particulars about
Tiruvannamalai and Sri Ramana Maharshi.  I wrote back saying that I had neither seen nor heard about the town and the sage
and I was interested in neither.

In December last year, I was posted to North Arcot and very soon after, a medical officer came to me, invited me to visit the
hospital at Tiruvannamalai and also added that the occasion could be availed of to see Sri Ramana Maharshi. Though  the casual
mention of Tiruvannamalai evoked memories of my friend's query, I had no impelling urge to go to the district town.

Official work however, took me to Tiruvannamalai after some months. When my inspection work was over, it was suggested
to me that I could pay a visit to the Asramam. I agreed.  I went to the Asramam and there saw Sri Bhagavan.

Before I saw Sri Maharshi, I had been told that He was four times operated on, for sarcoma.  When I examined Him, I found
a small ulcer in His arm above the elbow.  At the upper hand of the ulcer there was a swelling.   I couldn't be certain as to
whether this was the tumor growth coming up again after the operation or whether it was ordinary inflammation. I suggested
penicillin to eliminate this doubt.  Penicillin was not given and in course of time it proved to be a tumor growth.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #256 on: August 23, 2013, 06:51:35 PM »
There was a nest near Bhagavan's couch. The young squirrels became orphans as their mother was eaten by a cat. Therefore, Bhagavan, who have equal concern for all living beings without any discrimination, took care of the young ones.

"The little ones do not know that the wisdom lies in remaining inside the nest, because all troubles are outside. But they cannot remain inside, i.e. within" said Bhagavan and using this example Bhagavan taught his devotees how to turn the mind inwards and how beneficial it is for spiritual sadhana. He told, "If the mind is not externalised but remains sunk in the heart, then there would only be happiness, but mind keeps moving out."

Rangaswamy was an attendant to Bhagavan for a number of years and served Bhagavan with diligent devotion. Suri Nagamma referred to him as 'Nandi!' He was to Bhagavan what Nandi was to Lord Shiva!

Once he asked Bhagavan, "What is the path for keeping the mind inwards?"

Bhagavan replied, "It is exactly the same as what I am doing now. Each time a young squirrel comes out, I keep putting it back into the nest. When I go on doing it, the young squirrel learns the happiness of staying in the nest."

--

 
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #257 on: August 24, 2013, 09:41:01 AM »


Bhagavan always radiated tremendous peace, but on those occasions when crowds were attracted to the Asramam,
such as Jayanti, Mahapooja and Mahadeepam and such functions, this increased to an extraordinary degree!  The
numbers seem to call  up some reserve of hidden force of peace and effulgence, and it was a great experience to sit
with Him at such times.  His eyes took on a far-away look and He sat absolutely still as if unconscious of His surroundings,
except for an occasional smile of recognition as some old devotees prostrated.

Bhagavan never encouraged people who came and started to confess their sins. He would not allow them to continue but
shut them up by telling them not to dwell on the past but to find out who they were now in the present.  The point was not
the act but attachment to it, that mattered.  Dwelling on it in retrospect was the worst thing they could possibly do.  This
itself was attachment.

Major Chadwick - Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #258 on: August 24, 2013, 10:42:19 AM »
continues....

Lt. Col. Karamachandani:


I was called again to Tiruvannamalai only after six weeks. When I saw Sri Bhagavan this time, I found a big growth almost
covering the upper left arm except for a two inch space in front.  This growth was bleeding and losing serum, thereby directly
depleting the system of bodily fluids.  Added to this there was pain, which was exhausting the body.  More than haemorhage
and loss of serum,  pain was distressing feature.

The variety of tumor that Sri Bhagavan had was spindle shaped sarcoma, probably arising from the sheath of the ulnar nerve.
This is very painful tumor with its specialty of shooting pain.  In medical language we call it lacinating pain  but Sri Bhagavan
described it as something like insects creeping up and down the arm !  He bore this pain as though the body did not belong
to Him!  Whenever I asked Him whether there as pain, Sri Bhagavan said that it was nothing.

Within this period I came again, and found the tumor furiously growing, draining the system  fast and also arousing some
sensation of pain in the impregnable and imperturbable personality of Sri Bhagavan.  I could only illustrate this by one tiny
incident.  A few days before Sri Bhagavan's departure someone touched the cloth on the tumor and there appeared an
expression of pain on His face.  The attendant who touched the cloth said that he touched only the cloth on the tumor and
not the tumor itself.  To which Sri Bhagavan replied  that the cloth bore the weight of mountains!

I came to see Sri Bhagavan at about the midnight on the 13th instant. I found Him resting with closed eyes.  When He
opened them, He asked all the attendants to clear out of the room.  He repeated this half a dozen times and this was
interpreted as delirium.  But I examined Him and found Him to be fully conscious and not at all delirious.  I asked the attendants
to obey the Bhagavan's instructions by going out of the room.  Throughout the night I sat with Him. There was respiratory
embarassment, Cheyne Stoke breathing as we call it. Pain was very intense because even the least movement brought forth
evidence of pain.         

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 10:49:36 AM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #259 on: August 25, 2013, 11:41:35 AM »
As regards Satsangha, since we obviously take on the color of the company we keep, the ideal is to live with a Realized Sage.
But if that is no possible, then we should choose our company in the best way we can, avoiding undesirable company.  He never
taught morals, and had no special abhorrence of sex.  'It is better to do it than to be always thinking about it.'  This reminds
one of the Gita: 'Thoughts are acts in fancy.'

Always thinking of it is repeatedly doing it.  He naturally expected Sadhus to lead a decent life and set an example to others.
In any case, we should practice  moderation in all things, even in those that we consider good, and strange enough it may seem
a moderation in our Sadhana is also recommended. Overdoing austerities and prolonged and unnaturally forced meditation
may eventually lead to madness, unless we do such under proper guidance.

I once saw Sri Bhagavan appear really angry, the atmosphere in the Hall was electric.  One felt afraid.  The occasion was the
visit to the town a popular Swamy who initiated all and sundry, in fact anybody who came to him without any sort of preparation.
he taught them a form of breath control which proved dangerous to those who practiced it without observing necessary
restrictions.  He was quite the fashion for a short time but luckily was soon forgotten  and those who did practice his teaching
duly lapsed.  However, there were a number of casualties by the way side who went insane.

Major Chadwick.

Arunachala Siva.                   
« Last Edit: August 25, 2013, 01:18:53 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #260 on: August 25, 2013, 01:42:09 PM »

Lt. Col. Karamchandani:

continues....

I left in the morning and came back in the evening, just two hours before Sri Bhagavan's last breath.  The privilege of being
by His side, at that time, was something I prayed  for but which I little expected.  When I entered the room, Sri Bhagavan's
eyes were closed.  He was propped up on His bed and breathing was very hard.  The lips were parched and I gave Him
some drops of water.  I thought that a little fruit juice would be better.  I asked Him, 'Bhagavan, shall I give you some orange
juice?'  I repeated the question twice and each time, Sri Bhagavan shook His head to mean 'no'. 

Then a strange thing happened.  I stood beside Him prayerfully repeating the question within my  mind.  Suddenly, Sri
Maharshi nodded His head to mean 'yes', and opened His mouth.  I gave Him three teaspoons of juice.  Each time,
He opened His mouth and swallowed the juice. This was the last nourishment that Sri Bhagavan had.  This was about
7.45 pm.

At ten minutes to eight, Sri Maharshi's pulse was still perceptible. A big crowd of devotees was sorrowfully waiting outside
expecting and fearing that the last breath would be taken at any minute.  I felt that it was not a question of minutes and
to relieve the prevailing tension, a bulletin was issued to the effect that there was no immediate danger to life.  This\
relived the assembled devotees a little.

contd.,

Silent Power.

Arunachala Siva.           
     
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #261 on: August 26, 2013, 10:41:40 AM »

Major Chadwick:

During one conversation with Bhagavan I remarked that I tried to shake off the body.  Bhagavan replied that a man
discards his clothes and remains naked and free, but the Self is unlimited and not confined in anyway to the body,
so how can the body be shaken off?  Where can the Self leave it?  The Self is all embracing.  Wherever it is, it is the Self.
The ultimate Truth is so simple, it is nothing more than Being in one's own natural original state.  However, it is a great
wonder that to teach such a simple truth, a number of religions should be necessary and that so many disputes should
go on between them as to which is the God-ordained teaching.  What a pity !  Just be one's Self, that is all.

I remarked that people did not want simplicity.  'Exactly', replied Bhagavan, 'they want something elaborate and mysterious,
that is why, so many religions have come into existence.  For example, the Christians will not be satisfied unless he is taught
that God is somewhere hidden away in Heaven and cannot be reached without the help of the Church.  Christ alone really
knew Him.  But if they are told the simple truth, 'The Kingdom of God is within you,' they are not satisfied and read some
complicated and far-fetched meaning into it.  It is only those who are mature that can understand the matter in its naked
simplicity. '

Arunachala Siva.
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #262 on: August 26, 2013, 10:50:22 AM »

Lt.Col. Karamchandani - Silent Power:

continues....

At twenty five minutes to nine, the pulse was still perceptible and breathing was very hard and laborious.  It was distressing
beyond words to see that mighty personality suffering such pains.  I asked within myself why such a great soul should undergo
such agonies.  Had He taken on Himself the karma of others?  If He should suffer such pains what about others?  Could not
Sri Bhagavan relieve Himself of the pain?  Thoughts like these weighed in my mind as I stood watching Sri Bhagavan.

As though to provide an answer to my suffering, the picture changed and changed suddenly.  The pulse disappeared and
breathing became slow and easy, a very unusual feature at such a time and stage.  The breathing became slower and slower
till it completely stopped at thirteen to nine. The last breath was as easy and slow as any other previous breath.  We were
able to decide the last breath only from the fact that there were no breaths after. 

The jerk, the struggle and the gasps that usually announce the last breath in the case of ordinary people were not there
in the case of Sri Bhagavan. 

And so slowly and smoothly Sri Bhagavan secured His release from His physical encasement.  That was the end.

No.  How could that be?  Sri Bhagavan has no beginning and no end.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #263 on: August 27, 2013, 09:52:43 AM »

Major Chadwick:

One day Sri Bhagavan was telling us that the Tamizh Saint Manikkavachagar's body disappeared in a blaze of light
leaving no residue.  I asked Him how that had happened and He explained that the body is solidified mind.  When in
Jnanam, the mind dissolves and consumes itself in a blaze of Light, the body is burnt up in the process.  He gave
Nandanar as another example of this.  i mentioned the case in the Bible of Elijah being carried up to Heaven in a chariot
of fire, a poetic way of saying the same thing.  I asked if Christ's disappearance from the tomb had resembled this in any
way, but Bhagavan pointed out that this was entirely different, for Christ's body remained for a time after death, whereas
the bodies of others had been immediately and utterly consumed.  He explained that the subtle body is composed of light
and sound and that the gross body is a concrete form of the same.

****

Arunachala Siva.     
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #264 on: August 27, 2013, 10:26:01 AM »

Sunyata - Silent Power:

It was in the year 1929, that Poet Rabindranath Tagore and his secretaries (Arya Nikam and Amiya Chakravarti) met him
and I befriended him at Dartington Hall in Devonshire, England.  And it was the poet's casual invitation to the simple
'uneducated' gardener to come to Bharat to 'to teach Silence' to the ebullient Bengalis, which called him there.  He discerned
in the simpleton's Being a quality of Sunyata-Santi-Silence and intuitive awareness which was felt to be congenial and appreciated
in India.  The invitation gave the sadhu type the needed push or pull, to venture forth simply and solitarily into India, and
proposed 3 or 4 months's stay stretched into 45 years of Himalayan ananda-grace. The solitary pilgrim in Consciousness had come
Home'.  In India he read the Vedas, the Upanishadss and the writings of genuine Masters.

He heard of Sri Ramana Maharshi while in Kashmir and Tibet from Lamas, and later from Paul Brunton and Dr. W.Y. Evans-Wentz.

After spending several years in the Himalayas and other sancuraries, he came to Sri Ramana Maharshi in the year 1936 for the
first time, and was introduced to the Maharshi by Paul Brunton.  He came there three times or more later at a few years' intervals.
He had no problem, no disease, and no quest, and so asked no questions.  Maharshi, however, did ask him some questions
which he has now forgotten.

But with the darsan of the Maharshi remains an unforgettable experience, especially Sri Ramana's casual, as it were, statement,
'We are always aware'.  And this made a most powerful impact on him. It resounded in his consciousness like a chime
and continued to linger in his memory like a mantra or an echo of Sri Arunachala or Dakshinamurti.  He also remembers some
passages mentioned from the Bible: the phrase 'I AM THAT I AM', 'Be Still and know that I am God', 'Know ye not that you are
Gods?' and the words of Jesus exchanged with Nicodemus. 

He found Sri Ramana Maharshi's was pure advaita experience and his chief language, radiant Silence, to which only  mature
souls familiar with solitude could easily respond.  When Ramana was questioned by officious officials and was late asked
if it had tired Him, He said, 'No; I did not use my mind.;  He was mind-free and ego free.

****

Arunachala Siva.     
                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #265 on: August 28, 2013, 10:49:00 AM »

Major Chadwick:

Anantanaryana Rao said that once when he was attending on Sri Bhagavan during His last illness and begging Him to continue
living for the sake of His devotees, Sri Bhagavan replied:  'The primary duty of a Guru is to establish the certainty of His existence
in His disciples and having done this He is free to leave His body.'  Another proof that Bhagavan recognized His relationship of
Guru to His disciples.

Bhagavan said that the principal Sadhanas we should practice were to eat only Sattvic food and observe Satsangha.  He laid
down no other rules.  He said that the mind was entirely created by the food we ate which must be healthy and strictly vegetarian.
However, He never interfered with people or enforced such things on them.  The food in the Asramam was very hot, South Indain
being used to eating such food, but Sri Bhagavan did not complain, He Himself was a Southerner.  His attitude was that they
know what to do and if they preferred not to do it that way that was their look out. However, He was dead against meat eating.

Once in my early days someone spread the rumor that I was preparing meat dishes in my kitchen.  It was, of course, a lie,
my food was actually much more Sattvic than the Asramam food.  When Sri Bhagavan heard this story, He said, 'We don't
want that sort of thing here.'*

As regards Satsangha, since we obviously take on the color of the company we keep, the ideal is to live with a Realized Sage;
but if that is not possible, then we should choose our company in the best way we can, avoiding undesirable company.
He never taught morals, and had no special abhorrence of sex.  He once said it in answer to a troubled disciple in my
hearing, "It is better to do it than to be always thinking about it.'  This reminds one of the Gita, 'Thoughts are acts in fancy'
Always thinking of it is repeatedly doing it. 

* In detail, it is said that Sri Bhagavan quoted Saint Tirunavukkarasar:  "Even if a person takes beef, if he is the devotee
of Siva, who has got Ganga on His head, such a devotee is prostrated by me."  Further, He asked Annamalai Swami to go
and find out in Chadwick's cottage about this meat business.  Annamalai Swami came back and reported that there was
no such thing.

Arunachala Siva.       
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #266 on: August 28, 2013, 11:22:03 AM »

Silent Power -  'SEIN'

Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi is well known to all as a great Saint.  But only a few know of His philanthropy and humanitarianism.
Still fewer are those who experienced His paternal and maternal affection.

Of all those, one boy alone had the most enviable opportunity of sleeping with Bhagavan and enjoying His paternal treatment.
One and only one who had that golden privilege.

This was in 1920.  Bhagavan had come to Skandasramam from the Virupaksha Cave and a small batch of devotees had gathered
around Him.  The greatness of the Saint echoed all over the world.  Devotees from all parts of India were coming for His
darsan.  While males enjoyed the privilege of staying in the Asramam up the Hill with Bhagavan, the whole day, ladies were not
allowed to remain there after sun set.

Maharshi had a younger brother and sister, His elder brother having passed away prematurely.  This younger brother Sri
Nagasundaram who was working as a clerk in Tiruvengadu temple had a small son.  Fortunately, for Sri Ramanasramam to be
and unfortunately for His family, he took sannyasa when his wife died leaving a two year old boy uncared for. When both the'
parents left this child an orphan, Maharshi's sister, popularly known as Athai (aunt), took charge of the child and brought Him
up with unstinted love, affection and care.  It was not only because she had no issue of her own but also because this boy
was the only descendant of their whole family. 

This lad was taken twice or thrice a year to Tiruvannamalai to see Bhagavan and his father (of the poorvasrama), henceforth
known as Sri Niranjananda Swami, by Athai and her husband, who were living in the far South.  They were provided with a house
near the Hill and return to town in the evening, leaving the boy behind at Skandasramam. 

When at first Athai hesitated to do this fearing to cause any kind of inconvenience to the much loved boy, Sri Bhagavan said
that He would be well under His protection. 

In the night the boy would eat from the sacred hands of Bhagavan and Bhagavan would make him lie down beside Him,
cover Him with a blanket and lull him to sleep.  He bestowed on him all care that any sincere mother is capable of.  Early
in the morning He would take the boy to spring, clean his teeth  with powder, and wash his face.  Athai would rush up in
the morning. Bhagavan with the lad seated on culvert would tell the child, 'There comes your Athai.  See in what hurry
she runs up to see you.'  As soon as she came up, Sri Bhagavan would tell her, 'Take your boy, see, he is safe and sound.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     
                     

Ravi.N

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Re: Radha Ramana and Arunachala Ramana
« Reply #267 on: August 28, 2013, 07:47:23 PM »
Friends,
On this Sri Krishna Janmashtami day we cannot forget how the young lad venkataraman travelled the last but one stretch by foot to Tiruvannamalai:

The following day was Gokula-Ashtami August 31st 1896. He was hungry and still had to go twenty miles.As Venkataraman was walking down the street he
saw the door of one house ajar but nobody was to be seen inside. He went in and asked the owner, Muthukrishna Bhagavatar who was taking his bath, in the back yard for food. The Bhagavatar had a widowed sister who looked after the house, but at that moment she had gone to the nearby river to fetch water. There were no other female members in the house. The Bhagavatar asked him to wait till she returned.
In due course, she came and seeing the boy asking for food looked upon him as Krishna himself come in the form of a Brahmin youth seeking food! She saw the hungry look on his face and though she commenced cooking she felt the lad would not be able to withstand the delay. She said to him, "Come along, I shall serve you some left overs for the present." Venkataraman had barely two morsels when his hunger vanished. But the lady would not leave him till he ate all that was served.
Venkataraman had no energy left to walk any further.Nor did he have any money to purchase a train ticket. What if he sold the ruby earrings? But he had no experience in such deals. Finally he thought it best to raise a loan and approached the Bhagavatar. He answered all the Bhagavatar's questions and added for good measure, that he had lost his luggage in the train. He gave his real address also — in the confidence that at that distant place there was no chance of the news reaching any of his relatives.
The Bhagavatar examined the earrings and was satisfied with their quality. He estimated that the earrings would cost twenty rupees at least whereas the lad was asking for only four rupees. He saw no reason to suspect anything wrong and gave Venkataraman the money he wanted.By then, the food was ready. The lady of the house invited both of them and served them a sumptuous meal — it being a festival day her joy knew no bounds as she thought that her guest was none other than Krishna himself. She also prepared several sweets to offer to Krishna that evening. She gave a packet of them to her guest even before offering the sweets to Krishna. How blessed she was!
Venkataraman promised the Bhagavatar to take back his earrings as soon as possible. He collected the packet of sweets and set out for the station. At a little distance away from the house he tore to pieces the slip of paper containing the Bhagavatar's address — was he to get involved in worldly affairs any more? He reached the station and slept there that night. The train was to arrive early in the morning. Venkataraman purchased a ticket for Tiruvannamalai.
We have spoken several times about Venkataraman's hunger. It is true, he experienced hunger, his body felt weak and on several occasions would faint. But when he attempted to eat, even a little food would suffice. No reason could be given for this.

Excerpt from Ramana Leela -by Krishna Bhikshu

We cannot help recall how Lord Sri Krishna ate  a Grain of leftover food that remained  in the vessel  washed by Draupadi and how it appeased the hunger of Maharshi Durvasa and his entourage.

Namaskar.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #268 on: August 29, 2013, 08:07:18 AM »
Dear Ravi,

Yes.  Muthukrishna Bhagavatar's sister (a widow) not only fed Sri Bhagavan but also gave a packet of sweetmeats and savories,
even before she did the puja for Krishna on that Gokulashtami Day.  Sri Bhagavan took a little of food offered, but He never
at those sweetmeats etc., and eventually He threw away the packet after His tonsure at Arunachala.  Muthukrishna Bhagavatar
and his widowed sister came to see Him several years later in Arunachala.

Arunachala Siva. 
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #269 on: August 29, 2013, 09:37:18 AM »

Dear Ravi,

One more interesting information.  A group of 60 Ramana devotees from Madurai come to Asramam every 1st September.  I met them
once in Tiruvannamalai.  They traverse the path of Sri Ramana from Madurai by bus.  They come up to Tindivanam, alight the bus,
and walk up to Mambazha Pattu.  Their they see Muthukrishna Bhagavatar's house.  (This house is dilapidated and there is no
further generation living there.)  Then the group comes to Arunachala and then go to the Big Temple first.  They take bath and
come to Arunachaleswara Temple and have darsan.  They stay for one week in Asramam (under special permission) and then
return by bus to Madurai.

Very interesting.  The group consists even young girls and boys.

Arunachala Siva.