Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 199250 times)

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #180 on: January 31, 2013, 06:10:47 PM »
Bhagavan explained to Chadwick at length that England or India did not matter if one could control the mind.  One’s mind is the problem and that matters it would still have to be tackled even if one goes to England.  Bhagavan’s words brought tremendous consolation to Chadwick who abandoned forever the thought of return.  The poem is reproduced here:

Will you not let me go?
Like some insidious druggist you would make
Me come with craven pleading to your door,
And beg you of your mercy let me take
From out your potent wares a little more
And so,
You will not le me go.

Will you not let me go?
Here, in an alien land I pass my hours,
Far from my country and all formers ties,
A restless longing slowly me devours
That me all worldly happiness denies
And so,
Will you not le me go?

Will you not let me go?
You tell me “Yes, I do not keep you here”
That’s but your fun.  Why else then should I stay?
While months pass by and mount up year by year,
So that it seems I’ll never go away
And so,
You do not let me go.

Will you not let me go?
Nay, I’am a fool.  I cannot if I would.
I am your slave, do with me what you will.
That you should all deny, well, that is good
If so it pleases you.  I’ll speak no ill.
And so,
Refuse to let me go!

Will you not le me go?
I’m only sorry wax beneath your hands.
You’ve striven long to mould me into shape.
Your endless patience no one understands;
Your boundless love there’s no one can escape
And so,
You’ll never le me go.

Will you not let me go?
I’m a fool that I should try to flee;
For here, there is a peace I’ll never find
When I the least am separate from Thee;
Then I’‘ll be but a slave to caitiff mind
And so
I do not wish to go.

Boundless Ocean of Grace Vol.VI


Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #181 on: February 02, 2013, 07:46:21 AM »
10th October, 1948, PLAYING WITH CHILDREN

A few days ago, Mahadeva Sastri, son of Kavyakanta Ganapati Sastri, came here. Bhagavan introduced him to us all. As he is now living in this place our talk turned on his father Sri Kavyakanta yesterday afternoon. Bhagavan began telling us:
“When I was living in Virupaksha Cave, sometime in
1903, Nayana came there with his family. At that time this Mahadeva was about four or five years of age. Nayana prostrated before me and then asked the little boy to do likewise. He appeared not to have heard it and, with an air of indifference, kept quiet. Nayana too did not mind it. Then,
all of a sudden, that boy prostrated before me in full length (Sashtanga namaskaram). Like a young boy who has had his Thread Ceremony he placed his hands on his ears and then touched my feet. I wondered how that little boy could have known the correct procedure of prostration and felt that it must have come from family traditions.”
I said, “Yes. Every habit comes out from family traditions.”
Bhagavan: “That is so. This Mahadeva has since changed a lot. I used to talk with him frequently. During the days when I was living in the Mango Cave, Nayana invited all those near and dear to him, to listen to his reading of the “Uma Sahasram” in Pachiamman Shrine. His family also
came. Mahadeva was then eight years of age. I asked him if he remembered me. He did not say anything in reply and quietly went away to play. After a while, somebody came to see me. They prostrated before me and telling me that they had come once before, asked me if I remembered them. As I did not remember, I was silent. I do not know how he noticed that incident, but after they left, Mahadeva came to me running and said, “Swami, what did those people ask you first?” I replied saying that they had enquired of me if I remembered them as they had come once before and that I had been silent as I did not remember them. He promptly stated that he likewise did not remember me. I felt amused.
“You know what I did one day? Seating Mahadeva on my back I began swimming in the tank opposite the Pachiamman Shrine from one end to the other. When we were halfway through he began pressing me down, greatly elated, shouting ‘Aha, Hai!’ as cart drivers do to their bullocks.
I was tired and it seemed as though both of us would be drowned. I was of course very anxious that he should be saved from such a catastrophe. So I managed somehow to reach the other side.”
I said, “For one who helps people to swim across the mighty ocean of Samsara (the material world) is that difficult?”
Another devotee enquired if it were a fact that Bhagavan and Nayana used to swim in the Pandava Tank.
Bhagavan replied, “Yes. That also was only in those days. We used to try to excel each other in swimming. That was great fun.”
Another devotee said, “It seems you played marbles with children?”
Bhagavan replied, “Yes. That was so. That too was while we were in the Virupaksha Cave. The holes dug for the purpose of playing marbles must be there even now. Those children sometimes used to bring packets of sweets. We all shared them. During Dipavali they used to put aside my
share of crackers and bring them up to me. We used to fire the crackers together. It was most entertaining.”
I was reminded of the leelas (playful acts) of Lord Krishna’s boyhood days. Even now Bhagavan plays with children if they come here with toys.
"The Knower of Truth goes about the world, (outwardly) like a child, a madman or a devil"-Mahavakyaratnamala

Letters from Sri Ramanasramam-Suri Nagamma

Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #182 on: February 02, 2013, 08:02:32 PM »
3rd January, 1950, WHERE TO STAY? WHERE TO GO?

“Arrangements were once made for going to Tirupati also, weren’t they?” asked another devotee.
Bhagavan replied, “Yes. It is true. That was when I was in the Virupaksha Cave. At that time I was not covering the upper part of the body with anything. For some unknown reason the trouble from mosquitoes was unusually great that year. Jayaraman bought a good shawl and pressed me to cover my body with that. I did not even touch it. He waited for some time. The shawl remained folded. The mosquito trouble continued unabated. Unable to bear the nuisance, the people near me conferred amongst themselves and without the knowledge of outsiders, made all preparations for going to Tirupati. They told me that we should go by this way and should come back by that way and the like. I nodded my head in assent to all that they said. They fixed an auspicious day for the journey,packedeverything and,before starting, came to me saying, ‘Swami, shall we start?’
 I said, ‘Yes. Do go and come back.’ ‘What about Bhagavan?’ ‘Where can Bhagavan go? Where is he staying?’ I said. They
said, ‘We are unable to bear this mosquito trouble, you see.’
I said, ‘If you are not able to bear it, you may go and come back. Is it for my sake that you are going? Did I say that I was not able to bear the mosquito nuisance?’ What more could they say? They felt that it was no use arguing further, gave up their journey, and began pressing me to cover my body with the shawl. Jayaram’s son Pichandi was at the time a very young fellow. He used to come every day covering himself with an old rug. As I felt that they would not leave me in peace until I covered my body to avoid the mosquito
bites, I told them that I would wear the old rug if they gave that young man the new shawl in exchange. What could they do? Unwillingly they exchanged the new rug for the old one and I covered myself with the rug. That was the beginning of my covering the body with anything. When I began covering myself with that prickly type of rug, the mosquitoes did not dare to come anywhere near me. It used to be warm too,” said Bhagavan.

Letters from Sri Ramanasramam - Suri Nagamma

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #183 on: February 04, 2013, 03:17:03 PM »
By PROF. G. V. SUBBARAMAYYA

The  work with Sri Bhagavan had its rigours as well as its pleasures. Though he was all mercy and grace, he was at the same time a strict disciplinarian. He would not tolerate the least sloppiness. Everything had to be done to perfection. Nothing was to be wasted or spoiled. He would demand full attention and implicit obedience to his directions. One night a devotee who was an advocate insisted on sharing in the work. He was asked to shift a vessel containing sambar, and while he was doing so a few drops were spilled. At once Sri Bhagavan flared up and said : " You are only fit for arguing in court. Such work is not for you." The poor man never again volunteered.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #184 on: February 11, 2013, 05:13:42 PM »
A devotee asked, “Why does Bhagavan call Ganapati Sastri ‘Nayana’ (Nayana means father)?” “There is a reason for it,” he replied, “it is my custom to address all people with respect. Moreover, he was older than me. I therefore always used to call him Ganapati Sastri Garu. That was very distressing to him and so he begged me times out of number not to do so, saying, ‘Am I not your disciple? You should call me by a familiar name. This is very unfair.’ I did not pay any heed to his protests. At last one day he insisted on my giving up the formal way of addressing him and adopting a familiar one.All his disciples call him ‘Nayana’, you see. So I made it an excuse and said I too would call him ‘Nayana’ like the others. He agreed to it because ‘Nayana’ means a child and a disciple could be addressed as one’s own child. I agreed because ‘Nayana’ also means ‘father’ and hence it would not matter so far as I was concerned. I was still addressing him in respectful terms. Whenever I asked him to come here or go there(In Indian Languages you have a respectable form of addressing in saying 'Come' and 'Go'-Ravi) he was still uncomfortable because after all that hehad done, I continued to talk to him with the respect due to elders,” said Bhagavan.

Excerpt from Letters from Sri Ramanasramam-Suri Nagamma

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #185 on: February 22, 2013, 11:12:21 AM »
boy of eight and a half years sat in the hall at about five in the evening, when Sri Bhagavan went up the Hill. During His absence, the boy spoke on yoga and Vedanta in pure, simple and literary Tamil, quoting freely from the sayings of saints and the sacred scriptures. When Sri Bhagavan entered the hall, after nearly three-quarters of an hour, only silence prevailed. For the twenty minutes the boy sat in Sri Bhagavan’s presence, he spoke not a word but was merely gazing at Him. Then tears flowed from his eyes. He wiped them with his left hand and soon after left the place saying that he still awaits Self-realization.

(Gospel)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Hari

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #186 on: February 22, 2013, 12:51:30 PM »
May be the boy was in thoughtless state for a moment and the tears were tears from Bliss but eventually the vasanas have come up again.
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Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #187 on: February 26, 2013, 03:27:11 PM »
V.Kameswara Rao
Early next morning my sister , who had been taking her turn sitting by the boy during the night, told my wife and me that she had had a vision of Ammavaru(the spirit of smallpox)leaving our house and asking her to take care of the boy.   She gathered from that, in accordance with popular belief, that the boy would recover and no one else in the house would get the disease.   A few hours later a friend came in and gave me some sacred ash from Ramanasramam.  Another good omen.   We all began to fell hopeful.   On the 8th I received the following letter from the Asramam:
Dear Kameswara Rao,
We have your letter of the 4th instant and the same was perused by Bhagavan.  Prasadam(sacred ash) is herewith sent with Bhagavan’s gracious blessings for your child laid up with pox.
Bhagavan and bhaktas are well

                                                                                                                              Venkataraman
                                                                                                                              For Sarvadhikari



The letter thrilled me, but how did Bhagavan know that my son had small pox?  Why ask? How could I know how Bhagavan knew?  Anyway my son survived and is in good health.
I continued to be curious how small pox came to be mentioned in the Asramam letter.  Some elderly persons suggested that the moment Bhagavan saw my letter he received a mental picture of my son bedridden with smallpox.  Latter, however, Bhagavatula Annapurnayya Sastri of Tenali gave an explanation that appealed to me more.   “Was it necessary for you to write to Bhagavan in order for him to know what was happening in your house?   Is he not all pervading and all knowing?  But he does not interfere unless asked to and called upon.   If a man is singing in Bombay and you want to hear him you must switch on the radio.   If you don’t , the radio will not receive his song and you will not hear it, although he is singing.   Similarly if you want Bhagavan’s blessings you must establish contact with  him in the right way.”
My faith in Bhagavan increased enormously as a result of this, because it was matter of life and death for my boy and he gave him life.

From Volume VI , Boundless Ocean of Grace
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #188 on: February 27, 2013, 12:08:20 PM »
Below is a very interesting narrative written by Swami Tapasyananda, an eminent disciple of Sri Ramakrishna and previously vice president of the Ramakrishna Mission, of his meetings and opinion of Sri Ramana Maharshi. Its most interesting and illuminating to read the opinions and evaluations of a non-devotee, who was also a senior spiritual personage of an eminent spiritual organisation.

The photograph accompanying this narrative is a painting made in 1949 by the South Indian artist, S. Rajam, for the Himalayan Academy, and rarely seen outside their Kauai Hindu Monastery located in Hawaii. I reproduce it below with their kind permission


“The Maharshi impressed me as a rare type of man. I do not know whether he is a Jnani, or what he is. For as the Vedanta says, a Jnani can be known only by a Jnani, and I am certainly not one. But this person, anyone can feel, is not of the ordinary run of men. We nowadays come across men everywhere whose one thought is world-reform and things of that kind. But here is a man who is perfectly aware, as one can see from his conduct and movements, who has no such idea, who has in his opinion nothing to add to the sum-total of human happiness. He simply seems to exist, without waiting for anything, without being anxious about anything. On watching him I was powerfully reminded of the Gita passage beginning with “Udasinavad” (Like one that is unconcerned). He seems to take, as far as I can see no interest even in the Ashrama that has sprung up around him. He simply sits there; things are going on as events and other men shape them. The only activity of the Ashrama in which he seems to take active interest is cooking. He cuts vegetables in the kitchen, and if there is any special cooking any day he is sure to try his hand at preparing some of the dishes for that day. Spicing and other processes of the culinary art are performed there under his directions.

Another point that struck me is his silence. We used to ask in fun among ourselves why eminent professors who crossed the seas did not deliver their Vedantic lectures through silence. But here is a person who actually does this as far as his teaching of the Vedanta is concerned. When I asked him to tell me something of spirituality, the first thing he said was that silence is the highest teaching! The beauty of the man is that he remains faithful to that idea to the utmost extent possible. His idea is that the Advaitin has no position to state, no Siddhanta to propound. He regrets that in these days even Advaita has become a Siddhanta, whereas it is really not meant to be so.

 
Painting by S. Rajam, 1949

The reason for the existence of so much Vedantic literature is this: When doubts arise in the mind as our intellects are quickened, such literature is helpful in dispelling them. In other words, the Advaitin speaks only to dispel a doubt that might have arisen in himself or in another. Our saint remains faithful to this idea. He is mostly silent, and speaks but a little if questioned on any point. Of course he jokes and speaks occasionally on other things, but he has no dogmatic teaching on Vedanta to deliver.

He told me he says ‘yes, yes’ to everyone who interprets Advaita, even to some of his followers who interpret his ideas in the books published under his name. When I asked, regarding a book that I purchased in the depot there, how far the ideas stated therein are his teachings, he told that it is very difficult to say that, as he had no definite teaching. As people have understood they have written, and they may be right from certain points of view. He himself, he said, has absolutely no idea or inclination to write a book; but due to the entreaties of some people about him he has written some verses, and he told me that he is often troubled by men who take a fancy to translate them into this language and that, and ask him about the faithfulness of the translation.

So mostly the Maharshi remains silent, and people come, make prostrations, sit before him for some minutes to hours and then go away, perhaps without exchanging even a single word! I have got my own doubts as to whether people benefit by this teaching through silence. But yet people come from long distances to hear this dumb eloquence and go back satisfied.

Though he speaks but little, it is very instructive to watch his face and eyes. There is nothing every prepossessing about his personality, but there is a beam of intelligence and unruffled calmness in his eyes that are unique. His body is almost motionless except when he occasionally changes his position or wipes his sweat in that hot place. I was carefully observing his face; I found him seldom winking and never yawning. I say this to show that I am sufficiently satisfied that the absence of activity in him is not due to inertness.

The third point that struck me was the absolute absence of vanity or self-importance in him. Except for his toilette confined only to a kaupinam a visitor man not find it possible to make out Ramana Maharshi. He eats the same food as everyone else there; there is not even a single extra item or special dish for him. I specially noticed that in conversation he is not averse to using the first person pronoun, unlike some other Vedantins who use ‘he’ and things of that kind. I point out this to show how unostentatious he is. His silence, I am convinced, is not to assume a gravity of disposition calculated to keep people at a distance. And when he breaks that silence, as he does when questioned, he appears to be the sweetest and most friendly of men.

He makes no distinction between man and man for their wealth or position in society. I saw peasants and gentlemen in motor cars coming and being greeted with the same silence. They all sit on the floor and receive the same hospitality . . . I stayed in the Ashrama for three days. The Maharshi talked with me very kindly and quite freely on the several questions I asked him. Although his manner of replying was not so impressive as I expected, his thoughts are always clear, concise and free from all ideas of narrowness. Though he has not read much, as he himself told me in some context, he has a good grasp of all the difficult points in Vedanta.

My impression is this: Whether he is a Jnani or anything else I do not positively know. But I am convinced that he is a sweet and lovable person who is indifferent to all things about him, who has no end of his own to gain, who is always alert even when he seems to be most deeply absorbed, and who may be said to be perfectly free from greed and vanity. In seeing him I do believe I have seen a unique personage.”

Swami Tapasyananda (1904-1991)
Ramakrishna Mission

Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #189 on: March 05, 2013, 06:29:05 PM »
Bhagavan’s classmate, one Vilacheri Mani Iyer, together with his friend, Vembu Iyer, used to visit Sri Bhagavan at Skandashram often. One day, early in the morning, near the spring outside Skandashram, two persons were seen lying on a big boulder. They beckoned to me and asked me to go to Bhagavan and seek his permission as to whether ‘Brahma’ and ‘Vishnu’ could come in. This gave me a great surprise, but anyhow I went inside and announced the ‘names’ to Bhagavan. He smiled and bade me to let them in.

When I went and told them, they came in and had Bhagavan’s darshan. They also stayed for a few days and went away.

After they had gone I asked Bhagavan what they meant by saying ‘Brahma’ and ‘Vishnu’ had come. Bhagavan said in his usual calm manner, “What is to be done? They have the Bhavana (mental attitude) that I am Lord Siva and Mani is Brahma and Vembu is Vishnu!”

Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #190 on: March 12, 2013, 03:55:32 PM »
ரமணர் ஆயிரம் — அரவிந்த் சுவாமிநாதன்

”பகவானும் பாமர பக்தரும்”

ஒருமுறை பகவான் ரமண மஹர்ஷியிடம் பலரும் ஆன்மீக சம்பந்தமாக பல சந்தேகங்களைக் கேட்டுக் கொண்டிருந்தனர். பகவானும் ஒவ்வொன்றாக விளக்கினார். சந்தேகம் தீர்ந்த மகிழ்ச்சியுடன் எல்லோரும் அவ்விடம் விட்டுச் சென்றனர். ஆனால் ஒரே ஒரு பக்தர் மட்டும் தயங்கித் தயங்கி அங்கே நின்று கொண்டிருந்தார். அவர் அதிகம் படிப்பறில்லாதவர். அதனால் மிகுந்த கவலையுடனிருந்த அவர் பகவானிடம், “ பகவான், அவர்கள் ஒவ்வொருவரும் ஏதேதோ கேள்விகள் உங்களிடம் கேட்டனர். நீங்களும் சளைக்காமல் பதில் சொன்னீர்கள். ஆனால், பகவானே எனக்கு ஒன்றுமே தெரியாது. ஏன், என்ன கேள்விகள் கேட்பது என்று கூட எனக்குத் தெரியாது. என்னைப் போன்ற பாமரர்கள் ஞானம் பெறுவது எப்படி, முக்தி அடைவது எப்படி? நாங்கள் பிறந்ததே வீண் தானா?” என்று கண்ணீர் மல்கக் கேட்டார்.

அதைக் கேட்ட பகவானுக்கும் கண்கள் கலங்கியது. வாஞ்சையுடன் அந்த பக்தரைப் பார்த்த பகவான், “ ஏன் இப்படி நீயாக எதையாவது நினைத்துக் குழப்பிக் கொள்கிறாய்? அவர்களுக்கு பல விஷயங்களில் குழப்பங்கள். சந்தேகங்கள். அதைப் பற்றி என்னிடம் கேள்வி கேட்டனர். நான் பதில் சொன்னேன். உனக்குத் தான் அந்த மாதிரி குழப்பங்கள் ஏதும் இல்லையே! உனக்கு ஒன்றுமே தெரியாது என்கிறாய். “தனக்கு ஒன்றுமே தெரியாது” என்று உணர்வதுதான் உண்மையிலேயே மிகப் பெரிய ஞானம். அப்படி உணர்வதுதான் பெரிய விஷயம். இதை விட வேறென்ன வேண்டும்? எல்லாவற்றையும் ஈசன் பொறுப்பில் விட்டு விட்டு பற்றில்லாமல் உன் கடமைகளைச் செய்துவா. உனக்கு முக்தி கிடைக்கும்.” என்றார் பகவான்.

பக்தரும் மகிழ்ச்சியுடன் அவ்விடம் விட்டு அகன்றார்.

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Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #191 on: March 12, 2013, 03:57:11 PM »
BHAGAVAN'S PRASAD

My younger brother once came to the ashram. He was not in the habit of drinking tea or coffee and generally refused when he was offered some. When the afternoon cup of coffee was distributed, he asked to be excused. He was told that he must drink it, for all food given in the ashram, he was informed, was Bhagavan’s Prasad and cannot be refused.

My brother went straight to Bhagavan and said, “They say that coffee is your Prasad. I am not accustomed to coffee and I do not like it.’

Bhagavan answered, ‘I never ask for coffee. Whether I like it or not, people make me drink coffee, say that coffee is my prasad, and then drink coffee to their heart’s content. They also induce others to drink it, saying that if they refuse, they refuse my prasad.’

This reminds me of another ‘coffee’ incident. One of the devotees nursed a grudge against the ashram management. He asserted loudly that distinctions were made between guests. He claimed he was not being given the same hospitality that others were. He brought his complaint to Bhagavan along with his cup of afternoon coffee. Just then a mug was served to Bhagavan.

The devotee exclaimed, ‘You see, even Bhagavan is given special coffee! Look at mine, how thin it is!’

Bhagavan said nothing, but took the man’s cup and exchanged it for his own mug. The disgruntled devotee tasted it. It was a bitter decoction of jungle herbs! Only Bhagavan had the courage to drink it. Nobody else could stand it. The poor man was in a quandary, for he had asked for it himself and got it from Bhagavan’s own hands. To him, as a Hindu, it was Prasad, a sacred offering. Never in his life did Prasad taste so bitter!

- Krishna Bhikshu in 'Living by the Words of Bhagavan'

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #192 on: March 14, 2013, 11:07:00 AM »
”மகா ஞானியும் மகாத்மாவும்”

பாபு ராஜேந்திர பிரசாத், சுதந்திர இந்தியாவின் குடியரசுத் தலைவராகப் பதவி வகித்தவர். காந்தி பக்தர். அவர் 1938ம் ஆண்டில் சபர்மதி ஆஸ்ரம் சென்று காந்திஜியைச் சந்தித்தார். “பாபுஜி, அமைதியை நாடித் தங்கள் ஆசிரமத்திற்கு வந்துள்ளேன்” என்றார். உடனே காந்திஜி,” அமைதியை நீங்கள் விரும்புபவர் என்றால் நீங்கள் செல்ல வேண்டிய இடம் தமிழ்நாட்டில் இருக்கும் ரமணாச்ரமம்தான். அங்கு போய் ஸ்ரீ ரமண மகரிஷிகளின் சந்நிதியில் சிலநாட்கள் இருந்து வாருங்கள். ’அமைதி’ என்றால் என்ன, உண்மையான ’சாந்தி’ என்றால் என்ன என்பதை உணர்வீர்கள்” என்று சொன்னார். அதன்படி ராஜேந்திர பிரசாத்தும், ஜம்னாலால் பஜாஜ் உள்ளிட்ட அன்பர்களுடன் ரமணாசிரமத்திற்கு வந்து சேர்ந்தார். உடன் வந்தவர்கள் பகவானிடம் ஏதேதோ ஆன்மீக விஷயங்கள் பற்றிக் கேட்டனர். பகவான் தவமிருந்த இடங்களைச் சுற்றிப் பார்த்தனர். ஆனால் பாபு ராஜேந்திர பிரசாத் மட்டும் பகவான் ரமணரின் சந்நிதியை விட்டு நகரவேயில்லை. பகவானிடம் எந்தக் கேள்விகளும் எழுப்பவுமில்லை.

சிலநாட்கள் கழித்து ஆச்ரமத்தில் இருந்து விடைபெறும் போது பகவானிடம், ”சுவாமி மகாத்மாவிற்கு ஏதும் செய்தி இருக்கிறதா?” என்று கேட்டார் ராஜேந்திர பிரசாத்.

அதற்கு பகவான் ரமணர், ”ஒன்றும் இல்லை; எந்த சக்தி இங்கு இயங்கிக் கொண்டிருக்கிறதோ, அதே சக்திதான் அங்கும் இயங்கிக் கொண்டிருக்கிறது” என்றார் புன்னகையுடன்.

உடல்தான் வேறுபட்டிருக்கிறதே தவிர, ‘ஆன்மா’ ஒன்றுதான் என்ற உண்மையை உணர்ந்து கொண்ட பாபு ராஜேந்திர பிரசாத், பகவானை வணங்கி விடைபெற்றார்.

ஓம் நமோ பகவதே ஸ்ரீ ரமணாயா!

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Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #193 on: March 16, 2013, 01:15:17 PM »
It seems that in the olden days, Brahma once felt proud of the fact that he was long-lived. He went to Vishnu and said, “Do you not see how great a person I am! I am the oldest living person (chiranjeevi).”

Vishnu told him that was not so and that there were people who had lived much longer than he. When Brahma said that could not be, since he was the creator of all living beings, Vishnu took him with him to show him people older than him.

They went along until, at a certain place, they found Romasa Mahamuni. Vishnu asked him his age and how long he expected to live. “Oho!” said Romasa, “you want to know my age? All right, listen then and I will tell you. This era (yuga) consists of so many thousands of years. All these years put together make one day and one night for Brahma. It is according to these calculations that Brahma’s life is limited to one hundred years. When one such Brahma dies, one of the hairs of my body falls out. Corresponding to such deaths as have already occurred, several of my hairs have fallen out, but many more remain. When all my hairs fall out, my life will be over and I shall die.”

Very much surprised at that, they went on to Ashtavakra Mahamuni, an ascetic with eight distortions in his body. When
they told him about all the above calculations, he said that when one such Romasa Mahamuni dies, one of his own distortions would straighten, and when all the distortions had gone, he would die. On hearing this, Brahma was crestfallen.

(A story told by Sri Ramana Maharshi)

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #194 on: March 16, 2013, 01:20:41 PM »
பகவான் ரமணர், மகாத்மா காந்தி இருவரும் ஒருவர் மீது ஒருவர் மிகுந்த மதிப்பு வைத்திருந்தனர். காந்தி திருவண்ணாமலை வந்திருந்தபோது ரமண மஹர்ஷியை தரிசிக்க எண்ணியிருந்தார். ஆனால் தவிர்க்க முடியாத காரணங்களால் அது முடியாமல் போனது. மூன்று முறை காந்தி ரமணரை தரிசிக்க முயற்சி செய்தார். ஆனால் அது நிறைவேறவில்லை.

1948ல் மகாத்மா மறைந்தார் என்ற செய்தி நாடு முழுதும் துக்கத்தை ஏற்படுத்தியது. வானொலிகளில் தொடர்ந்து பஜனை, பிரார்த்தனைப் பாடல்கள் ஒலிபரப்பாகிக் கொண்டிருந்தன. அதைக் கேட்ட பகவான், “ தன் வாழ்நாள் முழுவதும் பிரார்த்தனை செய்தவருக்கு மக்களுடைய பிரார்த்தனை இது” என்றார் தழுதழுத்த குரலில்.

பகவான் காலை நடைக்காக வெளியே செல்லும் போது ஒரு பத்திரிகை நிருபர், காந்திஜியின் மறைவு பற்றி பகவானின் கருத்தைக் கேட்டார். அதற்கு பகவான் மிகவும் உணர்ச்சி மிக்க குரலில், “மகாத்மா காந்தியின் மறைவுக்காக ஒவ்வொரு மனிதனின் இதயமும் துக்கப்படுகிறது. துக்கப்படாமல் யார் இருக்கிறார்கள், யாரால் இருக்க முடியும்?” என்றார்.

அவர் உலா முடித்து திரும்பி வரும்போது, காந்திஜிக்கு மிகவும் பிடித்த “வைஷ்ணவ ஜனதோ” பாடல் ஒலிபரப்பாகிக் கொண்டிருந்தது. அதைக் கேட்ட பகவானின் கண்களிலிருந்து கண்ணீர் வழிந்தது. மாலை 5 மணிக்கு ஆச்ரமத்தில் காந்திஜிக்காக சிறப்பு பிரார்த்தனை, வழிபாடு நடைபெற்றது. பகவானும் அதில் கலந்து கொண்டார்.

மறுநாள் காந்தியின் மரணம் பற்றி பக்தர் ஒருவரிடம் “ ம்ம். சுயராஜ்யம் கிடைத்து விட்டது. நீங்கள் வந்தவேலை முடிந்து விட்டது. ஏன் இன்னும் இருக்கிறீர்கள்? போக வேண்டாமா? ஏற்கனவே தாமதமாகி விட்டது என்பது போல காந்தி அனுப்பப்பட்டு விட்டார்” என்றார் சோகத்துடன்.

ஓம் நமோ பகவதே ஸ்ரீ ரமணாயா!

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Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya