Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201111 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1545 on: April 17, 2016, 07:37:43 AM »


Sri Swami Sadasivananda writes:-

We cannot manoeurve and progress towards victory over an enemy that outnumber us, in such an
inimical battlefield, called the human mind, without soliciting real help.  Without an experienced guide as
the General of our forces, we may even court a fatal consequence. By legitimizing and even deifying our ego's habitual heedless indifference to God, and by labeling its urges as 'inner guru' or 'voice of our Spirit', we inevitably fall into the death trap of pramada.

In the Udyoga Parva of the Mahabharata epic, the blind king Dhritarshtra, who symblises the
blindness of the ego, cynically asks Sage Sanatsujata:  "What is death?"  The Sage replies:  "Pramada is death!"   [Saint Poet Arungiri Natha uses the word  marana-pramada].  It should be understood that the definitions of Sanskrit words are subject to philosophical intentions, and thus are prey to individual bias.  Therefore disagreement and even argument concerning proper meaning and usage are commonplace.   Nevertheless, the most learned scholars agree that the ancient definition of the word 'pramada' comes
from its usage in this scripture.  The word 'mada' means intoxication and when prefixed by 'pra' it becomes intense intoxication to the degree of madness.

Sage Sanatsujata is indicating the presence of 'pramada' brings about a spiritual death.  Thus,
the spiritual madness that at first manifests as indifference, inattention, and negligence becomes
deadly because it is directed towards God.  This is not to be defined as forgetfulness of the Self,
unless one admits to a willful and belligerent forgetfulness.

The offspring of pramada is 'duragraha', adamant determination to do that which you know you
should never do.

The compound spiritual fracture of being indifferent to God and habitually partaking in negative
action with utter disregard for the negative consequences, creates a karmic blood-letting, fatal
even to the strongest constitution.

(Source: As indicated earlier.)

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1546 on: April 19, 2016, 07:44:05 AM »

A vistor came to the Asramam on 10.2.1946 with a book called Sri Ramanopakhyanam.  His name was Thangavelu Nadar.  Bhagavan Ramana told Devaraja Mudaliar that it was not about anything about His teachings but the one which contained some stanzas found in some Nadi horscope of Bhagavan Ramana,
with notes and commentaries of another gentleman who was then editing a Tamizh paper.  Bhagavan
added that besides this version, some other Nadi version of Bhagavan's horoscope have been traced
and sent to the Asramam by different devotees.  Bhagavan Ramana added that there were various
people in the country who claimed to have various Nadis.  We don't know whether they are
correct or not.  This Thangavelu Nadar was originally from Kumbakonam.  There also used to be one
Swami at Tindivanam.  When anyone went to him, he used to tell them:  "You must go
and have darshan of Ramana Maharshi, at such and such time, on such and such date." 
This gentleman's name is also indicated in the Nadi horoscope and they used to come here
and tell me about it!

(Source:  Day by Day, Devaraja Mudaliar.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1547 on: April 20, 2016, 07:59:32 AM »


Once Brahma, who was puffed up with pride, exclaimed to Vishnu:

"I, being the creator of everything, am the oldest of all."  Vishnu
replied: "There are people older than you."  But Brahma adamantly
demanded, "Who can be older than me, since I am the creator of all,
including them?"

Vishnu, then promised to show him and took him to a Sage called
Romasa (who was so called because his body was full of roma, hair).
On being questioned as to his age, the Sage answered: "Four yugas
on earth make one day of Brahma.  His life span is a hundred years according to this scale.
When one such Brahma dies, one hair from my body will fall.  Many have fallen away and many
more still remain!  When all the hairs on my body falls away my life span will come to an end!"

The astounded Brahma was then taken to Ashtavakra and was again shaken by the response
of this Sage, who when questioned about his age, replied: " When one Romasa muni dies, one
twist will straighten up.  I will live till of them become straight."  On hearing this, Brahma's pride
was vanquished and he became humble."

Bhagavan concluded by saying:  "When right Jnana is gained, who wants this body?"

The same devotee again questioned: "Can Jnana be gained without the grace of Guru?
Did not Rama gain lucid knowledge only by the upadesa of Vasishta?"

Bhagavan replied: "Oh!  Is there any doubt?  The Guru's grace is essential.  Can anything
remain unaccomplished   by the guru's Grace, the glory of which is sung by many sages? 
The Guru's grace is no ordinary thing."

The disconsolate couple from Vijayawada who were listening to all these stories, exclaimed
that their despondency had lifted, "Look, how we have been granted the grace of our guru."
By deliberately narrating these stories, He has made our grief -laden hearts light once more." 
The gloom caused by the loss of their son faded away when they returned home.



Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1548 on: April 21, 2016, 07:42:54 AM »




Yes.  It is very difficult for most of us.  Bhagavan Ramana took only 20 minutes, to realize That.
But it is not that easy.  He said in one poem, Atma vichara is very easy, in the sense, that it needs
nothing else, no poojas, no personal gods' images, no flowers and no offerings.  That way.  But for
us, we have to toil very much.  May be several hours per day.  Then, it becomes natural for us.  There
is no need for any special sessions.  Sadhana time depends on the readiness of a person.  If the
person's ego is very bloated and if it refuses to budge, one may need a lot of time.  Ego does not
give up the battle so easily.  It is here, that Bhagavan Ramana's Grace is necessary.  He also says,
Grace is ever there.  But we should be fit vessels to receive it.  If we take a small cup, only that much
Grace we can pick up.  If we take a large drum, then the Grace is filled up more!  Many devotees
came to live in Tiruvannamalai, for this purpose.  To see Him everyday and to make themselves large
vessels.  Major Chadwick, having come from a Western country, did not return to his homeland at all.
Today, even though He is not present in a body, His Grace continues.  To visit Tiruvannamalai as
frequently as possible, is to make us experience His Grace and Presence more and more.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1549 on: April 21, 2016, 07:51:26 AM »


The following is an abridgment of a two part article by Reinhard Jung, who visited Tiruvannamalai
regularly.  Wherever the word "I" appears please take it as told by Reinhard Jung, unless specifically
stated otherwise.  The articles appeared in Jan-Mar and July-Sep issues of Mountain Path, 2008.

Some thirty years ago while struggling to gain a practical understanding of Bhagavan Ramana's
Self-inquiry, I began to study Buddhism.  Even earlier, I had been deeply touched by some Zen
essays, which stirred up a recognition in me, meeting as if an old friend after a long time and it
was a great delight to realize that these masters had expressed what I longed for even though it
still seemed to be far away.

Bhagavan Ramana has always been my pole-star of all spiritual truth itself.  He entered my life through
a book that was gifted to me by a friend quite unexpectedly at a time when I lied in deep existential crisis.
That is why, I feel that He came to me.  Although I did not understand much of the philosophy at first
I was completely drawn in by he photos of Bhagavan Ramana and a serene atmosphere redolent of
a beautiful perfume.  This happened in 1970 but I feel that on the level of the heart, everything was
complete already.

Self inquiry like Bhagavan Ramana Himself was a mystery to me and irresistible.  I had learned
Transcendental Meditation and during the six month TM teacher training course I meditated up to
10 hours per day.  There were subtle, quiet states of mind which open up the sense of awareness,
and a love grows for this acts of turning within. But self inquiry was then like a Zen koan -- it was
active and I strained myself trying to objectify the "I". I soon came to know about the deep value
of sensing and feeling 'into the body'.  But this practical knowledge has been elaborated
in the Theravada school of Buddhism. [This is the original school of Buddhism, which exists even
today in Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka.].  Because to turn the mind to the perceiver was too big a
step, attractive as it might be, I felt I had to start more from the ground of average experience --
to realize the subject of the experience by starting from the objective stance as has been taught
by Bhagavan Ramana, right at the beginning in Who am I?  [Section 11 of Who am I?, in the translation
by T.M.P. Mahadevan.]

"As each thought arises, one should inquire with dialogue, "To whom has this thought arisen?"
The answer that would emerge would be "To me...." To realize that the momentary perceived object
is to be related to subject stresses the subjective part and helps let go of clinging to the object.
This process of abandoning the unconscious relationship between a perceiving ego and its object starts
in Theravada schools proceeding from outer to inner levels.  In Vipassana, one starts with a breath or
general changing the body sensations.  The practice develops a continuous close watching practice
sitting and walking meditation, which can intensify during retreats up to 20 hours or more.

(Source:  As indicated in the beginning of the post.)

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1550 on: April 23, 2016, 07:52:04 AM »



When Bhagavan Ramana was on the Hill, serpents
and peacocks used to remain quiet, friendly to each other
in His Presence.  Panthers which came to tanks and ponds
to drink water, finished their work and went away without
harming anyone.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1551 on: April 23, 2016, 07:53:56 AM »


n 1945, there was in the Asramam, a small, sickly, lame, puppy that we feared would die at any moment.  But under Bhagavan's
constant care, he not only recovered health but began to eat
iddlies [rice-cakes] daily with so much relish that Bhagavan
nicknamed him Iddli Swami.  Relating this incident, I wrote
on June 15, 1945, a Telugu verse meaning:

"O Ramana, you once [as Lord Krishna] straightened
and beautfied the hunchback woman of your abounding
Grace. So now you have reared this little lame puppy to
a fine Iddli Swami. How wonderful!"

Subbaramayya also composed couple of verses reading as under:

1. "Seeing you caress peacocks, squirrels, cows, dogs
and monkeys and children with such tender Grace, anyone
must melt to his bonds. O Ramana!"

2. "So many birds and animals coming to you, have attained
deliverance.  Likewise do bless us with Grace this human
animal that has sought refuge at your feet, O Ramana!"

(Source: Arunachala's Ramana, Boundless Ocean of Grace,
Volume 5. Sri Ramanasramam, Tiruvannamalai.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1552 on: April 26, 2016, 07:38:59 AM »


Once a devotee with some familiarity complained to Bhagavan Ramana:  "Bhagavan!
Why do people behave like this [in an undesirable manner] even in your august presence?"

With a smile, Bhagavan replied: "Yes, what else can be done? That which is within comes out.
Nothing that is not inside can come out, you see. If there is something good, it comes out;
so also that which is bad likewise comes out.  Nothing can remain bottled up within for long."

"That means, the Sannidhi in the presence of Jnanis and Mahatmas  acts only as a mirror.
Whatever is within gets reflected outside. Is that so?" asked the devotee.

"Yes. That is so. The thoughts of the one sitting opposite to me get reflected here. What of that?
Where people gather together such things happen.  It can't be helped."  said Bhagavan Ramana.

(Source: Arunachala's Ramana, Boundless Ocean of Grace.
Volume 5. Sri Ramanasramam, Tiruvannamalai.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1553 on: April 30, 2016, 07:48:31 AM »



Once Swami Rajeswarananda had planned to take a big party of pilgrims with Bhagavan in their midst.  Bhagavan Ramana said:  "I did not consent to go and the thing had to be dropped.  What is there I
could go and see?  I see nothing.  What is the use of my going anywhere? Nothing can be seen by me. 'Paarthal Ondrum Terihiradhu Illai'."

This is one of the self-revealing statements which escape Bhagavan's lips. 

The following remarks were also made by Bhagavan, on the same night.

"The Jnani sees he is the Self and it is on that Self, as the screen that the various cinema-pictures
of what is called the world pass.  He remains unaffected by the shadows which play on the surface
of that screen.  See with the physical eye, and you see the world.  See with the eye
of realization, everything appears as the Self, Brahma-mayam."

"To see an object that is in the dark, both the eye and the light of the lamp are required.  To see
the light only the eye is enough.  But to see the Sun, there is no need of any other light.

(Source: Day by Day, Devaraja Mudaliar, 21st November
1945.)

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1554 on: May 01, 2016, 01:17:17 PM »




Bhagavan Ramana's kindness was proverbial.  His concern for
the downtrodden and ignorant was phenomenal.  His kindness
was directly proportional to the misery of the visitor.  Also,
his welcoming smile to an infant was warmer than that to a
learned scholar.

There were several occasions when people exceeded their
limits in their talk and 'discourses' with Bhagavan Ramana.
Such behavior was looked upon as a nuisance by those who
came to Him for meditation or self enquiry which was facilitated
by His presence and some of them did feel the results straightaway.

There was one Sanksrit scholar who came and was talking about
scriptures everyday, day in and day out.  Everyone got annoyed
but Bhagavan simply was listening to him.  After a few days,
the Pandit came to the Old Hall and simply kept silent!  No talks,
no Sanskrit scriptures, no lingual diarrohea!  Bhagavan Ramana
simply looked at the devotees and said:  Pandit has also become
like us! 

On another occasion, a Pandit was speaking in Sanskrit.  Again,
torrents of speeches in the tongue of the gods that even gods
would begin to sulk. Jagadeeswara Sastri had to stand up and
shout:  "O dhushta, (mischievous fellow)  please stop all this nonsense!" Pandit then kept quiet.

Why did aberrations occur?  By the touch of Bhagavan's Sakti,
the mind of some visitors got churned and their latent tendencies,
vasanas, surfaced.  These were imbued with three gunas and
showed themselves as irreverent acts.

This is how a Guru acts due to abundant grace.

Nokkiye karuthi mei thakkiye pakkuvamm
Akki nee andu aruL arunachala!  (Verse 66 of Sri AAMM)

By seeing, considering or thinking, and then by touching
me, you cooked me with your grace, O Arunachala!

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1555 on: May 04, 2016, 07:46:00 AM »
Today, the 4th May 2016 is Sri Bhagavan's Maha Aradhanai, i.e His leaving the mortal body and combining
with Sivam, day.  It is Krishna Paksha Trayodasi day.  There will be special abhishekam, alankaram and
arti for Sri Bhagavan's Maha Samadhi.  There will be a lot of bhkatas today swarming the Asramam.

After the special aradhana, there will be lunch with sweets to the visitors/bhaktas.

There will also be special events like singing, dancing etc., in the Asramam in the afternoon.

To annihilate recurrent Vasanas
And bring to being knowledge free
From dread delusion and desire,
Know that the mantra true is but
Devotion to the Guru's Feet.

- The Garland of Guru's Sayings - 308.  (Muruganar).

Arunachala Siva.     

atmavichar100

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1556 on: May 05, 2016, 12:26:24 PM »
CONVERSATIONS WITH ANNAMALAI SWAMI

If one is lucky enough to find a Guru like Bhagavan one should stay with him and serve him wholeheartedly. Many people came to Bhagavan, did seva [service], and said that they wanted Self realization. After some time many of these people forgot the purpose for which they came to Bhagavan. They started dabbling in ashram politics and soon lost their desire for Self-realization.
Other people had a few good experiences and then left, thinking that they had nothing more to learn.
If you have the opportunity to stay with a Guru you should not waste your good fortune by leaving him or by indulging in activities in his vicinity.

- LWB p. 330
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1557 on: May 12, 2016, 09:22:25 AM »

The following is an abridgment of a two part article by Reinhard Jung, who visits Tiruvannamalai
regularly.

Wherever the word "I" appears please take it as told by Reinhard Jung, unless specifically stated
otherwise.  The articles appeared in Jan-Mar and July-Sep issues of Mountain Path, 2008.

Some thirty years ago while struggling to gain a practical understanding of Bhagavan Ramana's
Self-inquiry, I began to study Buddhism.  Even earlier, I had been deeply touched by some Zen essays,
which stirred up a recognition in me, meeting as if an old friend after a long time and it was a great
delight to realize that these masters had expressed what I longed for even though it still seemed to
be far away.

Bhagavan Ramana has always been my pole-star of all spiritual truth itself.  He entered my life through
a book that was gifted to me by a friend quite unexpectedly at a time when I lied in deep existential crisis.
That is why, I feel that He came to me.  Although I did not understand much of the philosophy at first
I was completely drawn in by he photos of Bhagavan Ramana and a serene atmosphere redolent of a
beautiful perfume.  This happened in 1970 but I feel that on the level of the heart, everything was
complete already.

Self inquiry like Bhagavan Ramana Himself was a mystery to me and irresistible.  I had learned
Transcendental Meditation and during the six month TM teacher training course I meditated up to
10 hours per day.  There were subtle, quiet states of mind which open up the sense of awareness,
and a love grows for this acts of turning within. But self inquiry was then like a Zen koan -- it was
active and I strained myself trying to objectify the "I".

I soon came to know about the deep value of sensing and feeling 'into the body'.  But this practical
knowledge has been elaborated in the Theravada school of Buddhism. [This is the original school
of Buddhism, which exists even today in Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka.].  Because to turn the mind
to the perceiver was too big a step, attractive as it might be, I felt I had to start more from the
ground of average experience -- to realize the subject of the experience by starting from the objective
stance as has been taught by Bhagavan Ramana, right at the beginning in Who am I?  [Section 11 of Who am I?, in the translation by T.M.P. Mahadevan.]

"As each thought arises, one should inquire with dialogue, "To whom has this thought arisen?"
The answer that would emerge would be "To me...."

To realize that the momentary perceived object is to be related to subject stresses the subjective part
and helps let go of clinging to the object.  This process of abandoning the unconscious relationship
between a perceiving ego and its object starts in Theravada schools proceeding from outer to inner levels.
In Vipassana, one starts with a breath or general changing the body sensations.  The practice develops
a continuous close watching practice sitting and walking meditation, which can intensify during retreats
up to 20 hours or more.

(Source:  As indicated in the beginning of the post.)

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1558 on: May 15, 2016, 08:05:04 AM »

Once G.V. Subbaramaiah, had brought his two young daughters, Lalita and Indra, to the Asramam. 
The younger one Indra, who was hardly 5 years old was quite mischievous.

In the Hall, some devotees at that time were asking Bhagavan Ramana, how to remain still [to remain Summa], amidst various work in the world.  Bhagavan Ramana said that it is all in the mind.
If the mind could be quelled and made to stay in the Self, within, any amount of work could be
done, without desire-ship and doer-ship.

Meantime, Indra, was moving here and there in the Hall. She was pulling out books, Bhagavan
Ramana's stick, alms-bowl, the time-piece near the sofa etc.,  Bhagavan Ramana asked:  "Amma,
what are you doing?"  Indra replied:  " I am not doing anything.  I am remaining Summa."

Everyone laughed.  Bhagavan Ramana also laughed and said:

"See, this is how the worldly work should be performed!"

Arunachala Siva.


Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1559 on: May 17, 2016, 07:42:57 AM »


Sri Suddhanda Bharati, was a freedom fighter, a great orator and a Tamizh poet, well versed
in Tamizh scriptures.  He was running a magazine called Bharata Sakti.  He came to Bhagavan
Ramana in late 1920s and spent some years with Bhagavan Ramana.  He was also an adept in
Sivaraja Yoga.  One can see his photograph in the 8-volume edition of Arunachala's Ramana,
the Boundless Ocean of Grace.  He looks skinny, tall, very fair with shining eyes.  He compiled
the first Tamizh biography of Bhagavan Ramana titled Sri Ramana Vijayam, covering upto 1934,
was published in the same year.  The life of Bhagavan Ramana, the construction of Mathrubhuteswara
Temple and its consecration, Ramana's Maha Nirvana etc., were later added by Sri Sadhu Om and
the book was published with these information in 1958.  This is the second biography of Bhagavan
Ramana, after B.V. Narasimha Swami's Self Realization.

Arunachala Siva.