Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201405 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1395 on: November 22, 2015, 06:53:16 AM »



I wrote about how to do without thinking etc., in some other context.  I also said it is like the
Dance of the Unmoving, Achala Rachitam from Viswanatha Swami's commentary.

Devaraja Mudaliar writes in his entry of 25th Jan 1946, in his Day by Day.

Today Lokammal sang the songs of Manikkavachagar's Tiru Kazhu Kundra Padigam.  In verse 4
of that Padigam, it is said, " being ashamed without being ashamed" "NaNoNathathor
NaNameyidi...."  Bhagavan Ramana said that it might be one of those poetic expressions, like
Nadaamal Naadi and Ninaiyamal Ninainthu.... "Seeking without seeking and thinking without
thinking..." How to seek without seeking, how to think without thinking?  These are all the
ways of saying [by poets].  There is no other way of saying."

I checked up with my copy of Tiruvachakam by K. Subramania Pillai.  There was no light at all.
Muruganar thereupon said that Manikkavachagar writes such allusive poems.  In
Neethal Vinnappam written in Uttara Kosa Mangai, he talks about sixty four yakshas getting
the eight-fold gunas from Siva.  This story of Uttarakosa Mangai does not seem to have
been published. It appears that many things in Saint Manikkavachagar's life and many saying or
songs would be better elucidated if one could get a book of Tiru ViLaiyadal Puranam which can
explain all these.

Bhagavan got the book of Tiru ViLaiyadal Puranam, but the story was not there.

(Source: As indicated above)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1396 on: November 22, 2015, 11:01:48 AM »
The Best of Friends:

continues...

Several months had by then passed since he had read Paul Brunton's A Search in Secret India,
whose descriptions of Bhagavan and His life were illustrated  by a couple of photographs.  So,
although mere words and pictures could never prepare you for the impact of seeing the Maharshi
in the flesh,  Chadwick did arrive that first morning with some idea of what to expect.  On His side,
Bhagavan would have known that an Englishman was due to appear that day, eager to make spiritual
progress under His guidance; for Chadwick had written in advance to make the arrangements, and his
letters may even have revealed some details of his religious background and development.  If so,
they would have made fascinating reading.

Chadwick had become spiritually inclined at the age of 16, whilst attending St. Edward's, a highly
religious public school in Oxford.  By the time he moved down to the road to The Queen's College
at the age of 19,  he had made up his mind to become a priest.  In this he would be following
not only in the footsteps of his father, but of both grandfathers as well. If he had been born in their
era, the devout young man would surely have gone ahead and been ordained, but the time Chadwick
started university in 1909. the intellectual and spiritual landscape had changed beyond all recognition.
As science raced into the future, so the figure of Jesus Christ receded into history. The more we learnt,
the less omniscient and godly Our Lord appeared.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva. 
                         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1397 on: November 23, 2015, 06:52:43 AM »


There are about 10 places all in Tiruvannamalai where Bhagavan Ramana stayed between a
few hours to many days.  These are apart from Virupaksha Cave and Skandasramam.  There is
a small old Tamizh book, with back ground stories about each place and the rough period during
which Bhagavan Ramana stayed.  Bhagavan never left Tiruvannamalai for 54 years!  So all
these places are either in town or in the Hill.  I shall soon write about each one of them, Bhagavan willing.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1398 on: November 23, 2015, 06:57:09 AM »


Palakottu  - Just behind Mother's Temple.  There is a small gate to enter the bushy forest area.
After about 100 meters, you can see some cottages.  This is where Annamalai Swami, Chadwick
and other great men stayed.  There is a Samadhi for Annamalai Swami.

Guru Murtham -  This is in Vetta Valam Road, about 3kms from Asramam inside the town.
There is a Samadhi for Guru Jnana Desikar, with a Siva Lingam.  Here Bhagavan and a few
others stayed for 6 months, when there was no water in Virupakshi Cave area.  There is a
small temple, which is often closed.  You have to check up with nearby houses.  In one of the
houses, there is a key, they will come and open the shrine.  You can take some camphor
and light it there.  You may pay some amount for the house people since they invariably buy oil
for the lamp.

Isanya Math -  This is on Giri Valam, main road.  Towards the end, you have to take a deviation
for about 200 meters.and you can see Isanya Desikar Math, which is managed by Kovilur Math.
The trust member stays in the adjacent house, where there is a Veda Patasala.  Here is where
Isanya Jnana Desikar attained Samadhi.  Bhagavan Ramana went for lunch one day, on the
compulsion of the then Kovilur Math Head, who took him in a bullock cart, literally lifting
Bhagavan up!  Bhagavan Ramana went there, had a lunch and gave a small extempore discourse
to students on Bhagavad Gita.  He was hardly 25 at that time.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1399 on: November 23, 2015, 07:02:36 AM »



One day Bhagavan Ramana narrated the story of Maschendra Nath.  He used to go everyday to
the town and say to people "For two Pooran Polis [ a sweet made out of wheat flour and jaggery
and ghee], I shall confer you Brahmam."  Nobody cared.  At last one Goraknath came to know of
this offer of M. Nath and offered to bring the Polis.  He went into the town got up a tall tree, hung
from the branches head downwards, and made a disciple to lit up a fire beneath and sit by the side.
The whole town swarmed around and wondered: What a great tapsvin he must be.  The disciple
said that Gokarnath would accept only a bhiksha where a thousand persons would be fed
with the best Pooran Polis.  This was readily arranged. Gokarnath then climbed down from the tree,
took only two Pooran Polis and ran to Maschendra Nath.  He told the people:

"You have fed the thousand persons.  I shall now take these two Polis and offer it to Ganga.  He
then told Maschendra Nath: "Now I have brought two Pooran Polis.  Confer me Brahmam." 
Maschendra Nath then made several pieces, of the Polis by biting here and there,  and threw the
pieces to dogs and birds and the river.  He then gave one piece to Gokarnath and took one piece
for himself.  Both then disappeared into the thin air.    Maschendra Nath thus gave Brahmam to
Gokarnath.

(Source: Day by Day, 15.2.1946.)

Arunachala Siva.   

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1400 on: November 23, 2015, 09:12:49 AM »



Ramaswamy Iyengar of Kumbakonam came to Bhagavan Ramana much earlier.  He was devoted
 to Him from his youth. Brahmachari, he used to wear only a codpiece.  But whenever he came to Tiruvannamalai, he would wear a towel.  He thought it was discourteous to be dressed like
Bhagavan in His presence. He had established a Ramanasramam in Kumbakonam and he
used to celebrate Bhagavan's birthday for ten days on a grand scale.  The celebrations were
marked by puja, poor feeding and music concerts.  Kunju Swami once went for that celebrations.

He would never stand or sit near Bhagavan.  He would always stand at a distance.  On arrival
at the Asramam, he would prostrate from the entrance to the Hall and he would do the same while
leaving.  He would see Him on  His way to or from the Hill.   Before Bhagavan returned from the Hill,
he would roll on the spots of the ground touched by His feet.  He would dust the sheets of Bhagavan's
sofa.

Ramaswamy Iyengar's devotion to Ramana was so intense, that while singing Sri Ramana Stuti
Panchakam [of Venkatrama Iyer] or Akshara Mana Malai [from the word Ramanan appears
once, verse 90] he would skip the word.  Knowing his extreme devotion devotees would not even
utter the word Ramana in his presence.  Once when a devotee inadvertently addressed
Bhagavan as 'Ramana', he slapped him nicely.  The devotee also apologized and did not react badly.

On a full moon day, he arrived in the Asramam.  He became uneasy and breathed his last around
4.30 am on the morning. He was cremated and the ashes were taken to make a samadhi in Kumbakonam.

Once when he stayed in Palakottu, he purchased big earthenware pots and prepared three kinds
of excellent pickles and sent them to Asramam.  Bhagavan Ramana said:

"He is an Iyengar.  He is capable of doing everything very well. He is very good."

(Source: From a special write up in Arunachala's Ramana.
Boundless Ocean of Grace. Volume 5.)

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1401 on: November 23, 2015, 12:56:11 PM »
The Best of Friends:

Bhagavan and Chadwick:

Part I:


Meanwhile, the Bible itself, which for Chadwick's priestly forebears would have been completely
sacrosanct, was being subjected to modern methods of textual and historical criticism. As they
searched for the historical Jesus, theologians in dog collars were questioning the truth of the
Virgin Birth and Resurrection itself.   The evidence suggests that Chadwick came into direct contact
with these radical new ideas at university, and they had a devastating effect.  All we can say for
certain is that he dropped out after two years without finishing his degree. Instead of becoming a
priest, he disappeared to Canada, where he took a job as a surveyor. From then on, he was never
part of English society again.

Only during the First World War, did Chadwick briefly fit back in.   The moment war was declared,
the drop out hurried home from Canada, to enlist, for the next four years he behaved exactly as an
Englishman of his class was expected to behave.  But once he'd been discharged from the army,
Chadwick vanished abroad again.  After that, he frittered his life away as a sort of gentleman tramp,
wandering from country to country and from one menial job to the next.  There were sporadic bouts
of meditation, but there were also love affairs, along with much drinking.  All in all, it would be difficult
to invent a more perfect modern type of the prodigal son.  Having been born into a rich Christian
inheritance, Chadwick now disappeared  to distant lands, where he recklessly squandered it all.
Yet the roots of this profligacy were to be found not in the prodigal character, but in his times.
As he was to prove once he'd surrendered himself to Ramana Maharshi, this Chadwick was as unswervingly
loyal and utterly devout as any of his priestly ancestors.  He'd just had the misfortune to be born in an
era, when the old spiritual certainties were crumbling on all sides.  The Victorian solutions of his father
and his grandfathers did not work anymore.  For them, the Anglican priesthood had been the most
obvious and logical doorway to salvation.  But when Chadwick's turn came, the door had been slammed
in his face.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1402 on: November 23, 2015, 01:26:02 PM »



Sometime back a person asked a question, "It is said that Aswathamma, Vibheeshana, Hanuman
and others are chiranjeevis, eternally living beings and they are even now living somewhere. Is that true?" 

Bhagavan Ramana said:

"Yes, that is true."

Bhagavan Ramana continued:

What is your idea of a Chiranjeevi?  Those that know the state which is never destroyed, where is
death for them, and where is birth?  They live as chiranjeevis for all the time and at all places.
We are now talking about them, and so they are present here.  When it is said that a person
lives for ever, it does not mean this body consisting of the five elements.   When Brahma Kalpas
[ages of Brahma]  themselves come and go like dolls' houses, is it possible to attribute permanence
to bodies that age? said Bhagavan.

(Source: Suri Nagamma, Letters from Sri Ramansramam)

Arunachala Siva.

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1403 on: November 23, 2015, 03:17:13 PM »

The visitor who had asked about his difficulties in the previous evening [about lust etc.,] came to
Bhagavan Ramana to take leave of Him.  He said:  I have already mentioned about my difficulties."
Bhagavan said: "Yes, they will go gradually."

Visitor:  I want Bhagavan's Kripa Drishti [grace by gazing].

Bhagavan did not reply.  Only a few minutes before that Colombo Ramachandra's two small girls
had finished singing and almost the last song [composed by his father, an ardent devotee of
Bhagavan] contained the lines,

" He who remains at Annamalai as the gracious Guru,
who casts His glance on them, dissipates their sorrows
and directs them to salvation. "

[The visitor must have understood the meaning]

Source: Day by Day, 30.1.1946. Devaraja Mudaliar)

Arunachala Siva.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 03:19:10 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1404 on: November 23, 2015, 03:21:18 PM »



On 29th Jan 1946, Bhagavan Ramana was going through the new Telugu edition of Ramana Leela.
A visitor asked Him:

"I came here about a year ago.  And even since, I have been trying to follow Bhagavan's instructions.
I am not, however, succeeding very well.  I try to look at all women as mothers. But I don't succeed."  Bhagavan Ramana did not reply and the visitor continued: "While I am at home, it is all right. But
when I go out and see women I am not able to control my mind and am swept off my feet.
What should I do?"  He also added: "I want Atma sakshatkaram.  What should I do?
I pray for Bhagavan's blessings. 

After a pause, Bhagavan replied:  'You say you are all right when you are at home. Be at home,
at home in the mind. Don't allow it go outwards, but turn it inwards and keep it at home there.
Then all will be well and you will have Atma sakshatkaram.  The trouble is that we are the mind.
See if you are the mind."

The visitor said: "I am a grahasta. Still I want to practice brahmacharya even with my wife. But
I am not able to succeed.  What should I do?"  Bhagavan replied:  "That is because of the age long
vasanas.  The sankalpas are so powerful because they have existed so long. But they will go."

(Source: Day by Day. Devaraja Mudaliar.  29.1.1946)

Arunachala Siva.   
« Last Edit: November 23, 2015, 03:24:29 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1405 on: November 24, 2015, 10:15:04 AM »
The  Best of of Friends:

Chadwick story:

continues...

So the first meeting in 1935 was momentous and climactic in every sense.  From Chadwick's
personal point of view, it marked the end of his long exile in the spiritual wilderness.  All those
years of wandering and futility came to an end the moment he finally set his eyes on Sri Ramana
Maharshi. Yet the scene has a wider resonance, too. For Chadwick is a question mark in human
form, a perfect symbol of the spiritual problems that beset the West in the scientific age. The young
priest who loses his faith and then drinks his way aimlessly from land to land somehow stands for us
all.  For twenty five years, Chadwick had roamed the world in search of an answer.  On All Saints' Day
in 1935, he finally found it.

From outside, it looked like a first encounter. After all, one of the parties had spent his entire adult
life in Arunachala, whilst the other had never till now set foot on Indian soil. How could they have met           
before?  Yet here is how Chadwick recounts the momentous occasion in his A Sadhu's Reminiscences:

'To try and describe my reactions when I first came into presence of Bhagavan is difficult.  I felt
the tremendous peace of His presence, His graciousness. It was as though I were meeting Him for
the first time.  It seemed that I had always known Him.  It was not even like the renewal of an old
acqutaintanceship. I had always been there through I had not been conscious of it at that time.  Now
I knew."         


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1406 on: November 25, 2015, 06:46:43 AM »



Dr. Karamchandani, the Parsi doctor, from Vellore, attended to Bhagavan during His last
days.  He says the tears of sorrow come about on the lower portion of the eyes.  The tears of bliss
come about on the edge of the eyes.  On the last evening Mrs. Karamchandani gave a glass of
orange juice to Bhagavan.  She had come all the way from Vellore to see Bhagavan and submit
this glass of orange juice.  She had darshan and Bhagavan took the juice without bothering about
restrictions on food and drink etc.,  Immediately, the milling crowd outside began chanting
Arunachala Siva, Arunachala Siva and the sound rented the air in the Asramam.  Karamachandanis
saw Bhagavan being extremely happy about the approaching time and He shed tears!  The doctor
says that the tears came from the edge of the eyes!

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1407 on: November 25, 2015, 01:11:40 PM »
The Best of Friends:

Bhagavan and Chadwick:

continues...

So, despite all outward appearances, this was not the start of a new friendship, or even the renewal
of an old one.  The Good Shepherd never for a moment abandons his sheep, though he may conceal
himself from time to time, disappearing behind a tree or the brow of a hill.  That morning in 1935, marked
the glorious moment when he came into view once more, and Chadwick immediately understood that
he had been there all along.  Through all those years, --- from the Christian devotion of his youth,
through the crisis of the lost vocation, and the long period of aimless wandering that had followed --
Sri Ramana Maharshi had been silently guiding him back home.

"Chadwick was with us before",  Bhagavan was to say, 'he was one of us.  He had some desire to be
born in the West, and that he has now fulfilled."

When the prodigal son finally wends his way back to his father's feet, he is greeted with a great feast
and treated as the guest of honor.   A special chair was duly laid on for Chadwick.  The other devotees
in the Hall that morning were of course sitting cross legged on the floor in a position almost impossible
for anyone to assume who is not initiated into it from childhood, and for weeks to come the Englishman
remained blissfully unaware that they all considered it offensive to occupy a chair in the presence of
the Guru.  The feast itself consisted of the spiritual food for which Chadwick had been hungering for
so many years.  If Chadwick was a question mark in human form, then now he was finally to be satisfied
with all the answers he so desperately wanted.

Yet, if he also symbolized the entire West with all its modern dilemmas and doubts, then it is interesting
to note that this first conversation was all about Christianity.  In subsequent discussions, Chadwick would
ask about meditation and the nature of cosmic consciousness, but his most urgent need was to solve the
burning riddle of the Gospels which has perplexed him since his youth.  From the jotted sketch in Talks,
it appears that he and Bhagavan discussed the symbolism of the Crucifixion, Christ cry of despair from
the Cross, the conversation of St.Paul and the mystery of the Trinity.  All in all, Chadwick's questions were
very much those one might expect from a priest who would lost his vocation.  And Bhagavan pronounced
on these Christian mysteries with a supreme authority that left no room for further doubt.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1408 on: November 25, 2015, 03:13:35 PM »
Kartikai Deepam:

Bhagavan Ramana used to anxious like a child to see the Mahadeepam on the Hill.
His sofa was moved to the front side of Mother's Shrine and He used to sit there and
watch the Mahadeepam.  As the time approached, his eagerness grew, and He was
joyful to see the Mahadeepam when it was lighted.


Deepa Darsana Tattvam:

What is the principle behind seeing the Deepam?

One should leave the wrong notion that this body is 'I'  and the buddhi should be focused
towards the Heart, and fix it there and with the inward eye one should see the  Light of
within which is Advaitam.  This is seeing the Annamalai Light within, which is said to be in
the center of the earth.

Sadhakas of Tiruvannamalai:

(Suchitra Satyanaryan)

A unique species of
Burnt ropes
Who carry their bodies  around
Simply and lightly
Sometimes very heavily
On hired bicycles tiny scooters or foot
In and out of Ramanasramam
In and out of Old Hall, Mother's temple, Samadhi Hall,
Dining Hall, Skandasramam, Virupaksha
Round and the round mountain,
round and round His Samadhi,
With their own singular brand
Of grim and benign silences
And secret sustaining humour
Each working with the single lethal aim
And under tight Inner commanded scheduleds
Of performing His or Her own funeral rites
At Ramana's Feet
Before the body falls.

Deepam in Sri Ramanasramam:

Inside Ramanasramam just before the Samadhi Hall, there used to be a light, of thick wigs,
lighted just at the moment of Light on the Mountain.  This light will burn for about 8 days,
that is, till the Light in the Mountain ceases to burn.  Devotees used to give oil and ghee for
this light.

***
Arunachala Siva.         

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #1409 on: November 26, 2015, 06:28:01 AM »




When Bhagavan Ramana was in His last days [ He had pain,
which should have been unbearable for anyone else], the
attendants asked Him:  "Bhagavan!  Is it paining too much?"
Bhagavan Ramana said:  "Yes, the body is paining!"  He was
not the body or the mind.

Arunachala Siva.