Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 187540 times)

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #120 on: November 19, 2012, 04:25:12 PM »
Kanakammal's Memories of Bhagavan

Sri Bhagavan was observing the activity of a child, who was pointing out that Sri Bhagavan's head was clean shaven and so is hers, etc. He talked about how observant some children are.

This led Sri Bhagavan to recall an incident about a little girl who used to live in Ramana Nagar. She had observed people bringing food and offering it to Sri Bhagavan and then distributing it to the people in the hall. One day she approached Sri Bhagavan hesitatingly, and upon asking he found out that she had wrapped a few papads in her dress, having got them from her kitchen at home. Sri Bhagavan and the girl shared the papads. The next day she repeated the act by bringing fruits from her garden. After sharing the fruits with her, He asked her if there was a picture of him in their house. The girl said that they had one. Sri Bhagavan asked her to henceforth offer the food to the picture and eat it herself and think that he ate it.

An elderly man walked into the hall and upon seeing him, Sri Bhagavan's behavior changed: he appeared to behave like an obedient student. The person who entered said, “Bhagavan, please clear all my doubts.”
Smiling and looking at a devotee nearby, Sri Bhagavan replied, “Do you know who this person is? I came away from Madurai unable to answer his questions. Now he has come all the way here with more questions!” The visitor was Sri Bhagavan's Tamil teacher in school.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #121 on: November 19, 2012, 04:29:11 PM »
By Kunju Swami

Once some awkward problems concerning Ashram management cropped up. Without being directly concerned, I was worried about them, as I felt that failure to solve them satisfactorily would impair the good name of the Ashram. One day. two or three devotees went to Bhagavan and put the problems before him. I happened to enter the hall while they were talking about them, and he immediately turned to me and asked me why I had come in at this time and why I was interesting myself in such matters. I did not grasp the meaning of his question, so Bhagavan explained that a person should occupy himself only with that purpose with which he had originally come to the Ashram and asked me what my original purpose had been. I replied: "To receive Bhagavan's Grace." So he said: "Then occupy yourself with that only."
He further continued by asking me whether I had any interest in matters concerning the Ashram management when I first came here. On my replying that I had not, he added: "Then concentrate on the original purpose of your coming here."
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #122 on: November 19, 2012, 04:36:10 PM »
The author is MR.C.R.Rajamani

 I learned that the boy had come along with his parents, both of them Theosophists. The Theosophical Society's world convention is usually held at their international headquarters at Adyar, Madras in December-January. Some of the people from foreign countries choose to visit Sri Ramanasramam at that time. The boy's parents arranged a trip to Tiruvannamalai, but he stoutly refused to go with them, as he was not in tune with conditions in India which can never be adequate when compared with the posh amenities of his native Australia. However, he changed his mind at the last moment and did make the trip. Within an hour of his face-to-face meeting with Sri Bhagavan, his mental barriers were reduced to nothingness. He shed tears for quite some time and later said to his mother, "I am so happy. I don't want to leave his presence. I want to be always with him!" His mother was most upset. She pleaded with Sri Bhagavan, "Swami, please release my son! He is our only child. We will be miserable without him." Sri Bhagavan smiled at her and said, "Release him? I am not keeping him tied up. He is a mature soul. A mere spark has ignited his spiritual fire." So, that casual look was a spark of tremendous power. Turning to the boy, He said, "Go with your parents. I will always be with you." He spoke in Tamil throughout, but the boy understood him fully. He bowed to Sri Bhagavan and reluctantly left with his parents, immensely rich with the newly-found spiritual treasure.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #123 on: November 19, 2012, 04:44:43 PM »


BHAGAVAN was most tender with people who thought themselves for some reason or other to be miserable sinners and who went to him torn by repentance.
During summer evenings we used to sit in the open space near the well. We would collect in the dining hall for dinner and come back to the well. Suddenly, one day, a visitor started weeping bitterly, "I am a horrible sinner. For a long time I have been coming to your feet, but there is no change in me. Can I become pure at last? How long am I to wait? When I am here near you I am good for a time, but when I leave this place I become a beast again. You cannot imagine how bad I can be-hardly a human being. Am I to remain a sinner forever?"

Bhagavan answered: "Why do you come to me? What have I to do with you? What is there between us that you should come here and weep and cry in front of me?"
The man started moaning and crying even more, as if his heart were breaking. "All my hopes of salvation are gone. You were my last refuge and you say you have nothing to do with me! To whom shall I turn now? What am I to do? To whom am I to go?"
Bhagavan watched him for some time and said, "Am I your guru that I should be responsible for your salvation? Have I ever said that I am your master?"
"If you are not my master, then who is? And who are you, if not my master? You are my guru, you are my guardian angel, you will pity me and release me from my sins!" He started sobbing and crying again.
We all sat silent, overcome with pity. Only Bhagavan looked alert and matter-of-fact.

Bh: "If I am your guru, what are my fees? Surely you should pay me for my services."
D: "But you won't take anything," cried the visitor. "What can I give you?"
Bh: "Did I ever say that I don't take anything? And did you ever ask me what you can give me?"
D: "If you would take, then ask me. There is nothing I would not give you."
Bh: "All right. Now I am asking. Give me. What will you give me?"
D: "Take anything, all is yours."
Bh: "Then give me all the good you have done in this world."
D: "What good could I have done? I have not a single virtue to my credit"
Bh: "You have promised to give. Now give. Don't talk of your credit. Just give away all the good you have done in your past."
D: "Yes, I shall give. But how does one give? Tell me how the giving is done and I shall give."
Bh: "Say like this: 'All the good I have done in the past I am giving away entirely to my guru. Henceforth I have no merit from it nor have I any concern with it.' Say it with your whole heart."
D: "All right, Swami, I am giving away to you all the good I have done so far, if I have done any, and all its good effects. I am giving it to you gladly, for you are my master and you are asking me to give it all away to you."
Bh: "But this is not enough," said Bhagavan sternly.
D: "I gave you all I have and all you asked me to give. I have nothing more to give."
Bh: "No, you have. Give me all your sins."
D: The man looked wildly at Bhagavan, terror stricken. "You do not know, Swami, what you are asking for. If you knew, you would not ask me. If you take over my sins, your body will rot and burn. You do not know me, you do not know my sins. Please do not ask me for my sins." And he wept bitterly.
Bh: "I shall look after myself, don't you worry about me," said Bhagavan. "All I want from you is your sins."
For a long time the bargain would not go through. The man refused to part with his sins. But Bhagavan was adamant.
Bh: "Either give me your sins along with your merits, or keep both and don't think of me as your master."
In the end the visitor's scruples broke down and he declared: "Whatever sins I have done, they are no longer mine. All of them and their results, too, belong to Ramana."
Bhagavan seemed to be satisfied. "From now on there is no good nor bad in you. You are just pure. Go and do nothing, neither good nor bad. Remain yourself, remain what you are."
A great peace fell over the man and over us all. No one knows what happened to the fortunate visitor; he was never seen in the Ashram again. He might have been in no further need of coming.

By Voruganti Krishnayya
from the Newsletters of Arunachala Asramam
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #124 on: November 19, 2012, 04:53:34 PM »
Once a visitor said: "I have been coming to you, Swami, many times, hoping that something will happen and I shall be changed. So far I do not see any change in me. I am as I was, a weakling of a man, an inveterate sinner." And he started weeping piteously.
"On this road there are no milestones," replied Bhagavan. "How can you know in which direction you are going? Why don't you do what the first-class railway passenger does? He tells the guard his destination, locks the doors and goes to sleep. The rest is done by the guard. If you could trust your guru as much as you trust the railway guard, it would be quite enough to make you reach your destination. Your business is to shut the door and windows and sleep. The guard will wake you up at your destination."
Dr. Syed was a Muslim scholar and a great devotee of Bhagavan. His wife too became a devotee without losing her faith in the ways and conventions of the Muslim religion. She would not appear before other men. Stealthily she would come to the Ashram, hide herself in one of the rooms and implore her husband to ask Bhagavan to come to see her. It was a most unusual request, but such was Bhagavan's grace and compassion that even this was granted. Mrs. Syed would at first keep silent, rather than talk to Bhagavan through her veil; then later she would talk to him without a veil. But it took a long time for her to venture into the Hall without a veil and sit there like everybody else.
Dr. Syed and his wife used to stay in a rented house outside the Ashram and cook their own food. One day she felt a very strong desire to invite Bhagavan to their house for food. She nagged her husband, but he did not have the courage to request something so unusual. Meeting his wife outside the Hall was unusual enough, and twice he had asked Bhagavan to consent to it; that Bhagavan should go to their house for food seemed unthinkable. But the intrepid lady went on pressing her husband until he became more afraid of her than of the enormity of her request and hinted her wish to Bhagavan, who smiled and kept quiet. She would not give up. She was certain that Bhagavan would grant her wish if the matter were put before him in the proper spirit and form. At last, while Bhagavan was going up the hill, Dr. Syed and his wife stood before him and told him her desire. Bhagavan just laughed and went up the hill.
When they returned home in the evening, there was quite a row in their house, she accusing him that he had not asked Bhagavan in the proper way. At last he had enough of it all and said to her: "How am I responsible? The truth of the matter is that your devotion is deficient. That is the reason why Bhagavan refused." These words of his must have touched her deeply and she sat in meditation throughout the night. She wanted by sheer intensity of prayer to bring Bhagavan to dinner. During the early hours of the morning she must have dozed. Bhagavan appeared to her in a dream or vision and told her: "Why are you so obstinate? How can I leave the Ashram and come to your house for food? I must dine along with others, or they won't eat. Besides, as you know, people are coming from distant places, facing a lot of trouble to see me and to have food with me. How can I leave all these guests and come to your place? Feed three devotees of mine and it will be the same as feeding me. I shall be fully satisfied." In her vision she saw the three devotees whom she had to invite. One was Dr. Melkote, the second Swami Prabuddhananda and the third was myself.
She told of her vision to Dr. Syed, who invited all the three for food in his house, telling us that we could not possibly refuse. We were astonished and asked him the reason. Dr. Syed told us the whole story. We were all Brahmins and, although we were delighted to represent Bhagavan at the feast, we were afraid of what the Ashram Brahmins would say. For a Brahmin to eat in a Muslim's house is a serious breach of convention.
Dr. Melkote was in the guest room near the flower garden. I went to him and asked him, "What are you thinking about?"
"I am thinking of the dinner at Syed's place."
"Are you going?"
"I wonder. They are Muslims."
''If we go, we are bound to get into a lot of trouble."
"Yes, they may turn us out of the Ashram."
"Then are you going?"
"I am going," said Dr. Melkote. "I am taking it as Bhagavan's direct order. Otherwise, how could Mrs. Syed pick us? How could she know our names and faces so as to show us to her husband?"
"Prabuddhananda can go, for he is a sannyasi and can eat anywhere. Besides, he is not afraid of the Ashram authorities, for he cooks his own food. But we are taking serious risks," I said.
"Well," said Dr. Melkote, "we are going, and Bhagavan will attend to the risks."
In spite of these brave words Dr. Melkote was perplexed. We were to dine in a Muslim's house. Even if the food were vegetarian, what about the kitchen and vessels? What do Muslims know about the Brahmin rules and habits concerning cleanliness? How would we explain our going to a Muslim house for food? Why should we trust the vision of some Muslim lady? Could we really say that we were merely obeying Bhagavan's orders? Who would believe us? Surely not the Ashram Brahmins! And what an assortment we three made! One was a Kanarese householder, the other an Andhra bachelor, the third a Bengali sannyasi!
The next day when the bell for dinner was rung, we three went before Bhagavan and bowed. Bhagavan did not ask us the reason, he merely looked at us. Instead of going to the dining hall with others we marched out of the Ashram, passing before Chinnaswami who-O wonder!-did not ask us why we were going out without taking food.
Mrs. Syed got up early in the morning, swept the kitchen and washed the vessels carefully herself. She would not allow the servant girl to enter the kitchen. She had been scolded repeatedly by her relatives and the Muslim Moulvis for her devotion to a Hindu saint. She told them that while she used to say her prayers she would see the Prophet standing by her side. Since she met Bhagavan, the Prophet had disappeared and Bhagavan was coming to watch her pray. So great was her devotion!
After getting everything quite clean, she lovingly prepared dish after dish, and when we arrived, we found the food excellent. After the meal she offered us betel with her own hands.
When we were returning to the Ashram, Dr. Melkote had tears in his eyes. He said: "I come from Hyderabad and I know well the Muslim ways and customs. A Muslim lady will give betel leaves with her own hands to nobody except her husband or a fakir (a saint). In her eyes we were fakirs, the forms Bhagavan took to go to her place."
When we returned to the Ashram we were astonished that nobody enquired why we had not been present in the dining hall, where we had gone or what we did in a Muslim's house. How wonderfully does Bhagavan protect those who obey him! — from Ramana Smrti Souvenir



from the Newsletters of Arunachala Asramam
 
 
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #125 on: November 19, 2012, 05:18:11 PM »



Smt.Shanthammal

I was very poor and it took me a year to collect the money needed.
In 1927, three other ladies and I went to Tiruvannamalai. By that time Bhagavan had come down from the hill and was living in a hut near his mother's samadhi. We rented a place in the town, had a bath and went to see him. He was seated on a cot in a grass-thatched shed. Muruganar was by his side. As soon as I saw him I knew he was God in human form. I bowed to him and said, "The dream of my life has come true. Today I am blessed. Grant that my mind does not trouble me anymore."
Bhagavan turned to Muruganar and said: "Ask her to find out whether there is such a thing as mind. If there is, ask her to describe it."
I stood still, not knowing what to say. Muruganar explained to me, "Don't you see? You have been initiated in the search for the Self."
Although I was all mixed up, I remembered to honor Bhagavan by singing a poem from "Ramanastuthi Panchakam." It says: "Your spiritual splendor fills the universe with its perfume. Attracted by it numberless beings turn their face to you. I too grew restless and sought you eagerly. Where is He? Where is He? I enquired, and now I have come to you." Bhagavan asked me how I had come to know the song. Muruganar explained that he had given me a copy of the book.
We stayed for forty days. We would cook some food, sharing the expenses, and take it to the Ashram. Bhagavan would taste it and the rest was given to the devotees. In those days, Bhagavan's brother, Chinnaswami, was cooking for the Ashram. Some provisions were sent from the town by various devotees and the supply was very precarious. Often there were no curries or sambar, only plain rice and a piece of pickle. The Kartikai festival, for which Arunachala is famous, was going on. From three in the morning until twelve at night there were people coming and going. Bhagavan had to be protected by a bamboo fence.
I wanted to stay on until Bhagavan's birthday, but the other three ladies had to return, so I went to Bhagavan to take his leave. He asked me to wait a day longer, for the newly-printed Upadesa Saram was to be released. The next day he gave me a copy with his own hands. The thought of leaving him broke my heart and I wept bitterly. Very kindly he said, "No, don't cry. You are going to Ramnad, but you are not leaving Arunachala. Go and come soon."
I spent a year at Ramnad the way I did before. Bhagavan's birthday was nearing and I felt eager to go back. I had not even the money to buy a ticket, yet I resolved to start on Saturday, come what may. On Friday the invitation arrived. Later I came to know that Bhagavan had mentioned my name to the dispatchers. Bhagavan's picture was on the invitation and I took it to the ladies in the Ramnad Palace. They gave me thirty rupees to attend the Jayanti. It was the experience of every devotee that if they were determined to visit him, all obstacles would somehow vanish.
This time Bhagavan was on a sofa in a newly- built hall. He was explaining something from Ulladu Narpadu to Dandapani Swami. When he saw me his first question was: "Have you a copy of this book? I asked them to post one to you." How my Lord remembers me by name and how loving is his personal attention to my needs! What have I, an ignorant woman, done to deserve such kindness? How can I afford to keep away from him?

from the newsletters of Sri Ramana
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #126 on: November 19, 2012, 05:28:48 PM »
Day by Day with Bhagavan by Devaraj Mudaliar

"One summer afternoon I was sitting opposite Bhagavan in the Old Hall, with a fan in my hand and said to him: 'I can understand that the outstanding events in a man's life, such as his country, nationality, family, career or profession, marriage, death, etc. are all predestined by his karma, but can it be that all the details of his life, down to the minutest, have already been determined? Now, for instance, I put this fan that is in my hand down on the floor here. Can it be that it was already decided that on such and such a day, at such and a such an hour, I shall move the fan like this and put it down here?
"Bhagavan replied, 'Certainly.' He continued, 'Whatever this body is to do and whatever experiences it is to pass through was already decided when it came into existence.'
"Thereupon I naturally exclaimed: 'What becomes then of man's freedom and responsibility for his actions?'
"Bhagavan explained: 'The only freedom man has is to strive for and acquire the jnana which will enable him not to identify himself with the body. The body will go through the actions rendered inevitable by Prarabdha (destiny based on the balance sheet of past lives) and a man is free either to identify himself with the body and be attached to the fruits of its actions, or to be detached from it and be a mere witness of its activities.'
"This may not be acceptable to many learned people or philosophers, but I am sure I have made no error in transmitting as above the gist of the conversation that took place between Bhagavan and me. Though this answer of Bhagavan may upset the apple cart of our careful reasonings and conclusions, I am satisfied that what Bhagavan said must be the truth. I also recall in this connection the following lines that Bhagavan once quoted to me fromThayumanavar: 'This is not to be taught to all. Even if we tell them, it will only lead to endless discussion'.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #127 on: November 20, 2012, 06:40:46 PM »
In the early days of the Ashram, a pariah (a man of the lower caste) used to stand near the well and accompany Bhagavan whenever he would go up the hill. One day Bhagavan called him near and said: "Go on repeating 'Shiva, Shiva'." It was very unusual for an untouchable to receive this kind of initiation. He could never have secured it without Bhagavan's infinite grace. After that the man disappeared.


from the Newsletters of Arunachala Ramana
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #128 on: November 20, 2012, 06:43:07 PM »
Shantammal:

During the Kartikai festival beggars from all over South India would collect at Tiruvannamalai in vast crowds and they would flock to the Ashram for an assured meal. Once they became so unruly that the attendants refused to serve them. The matter was discussed among the workers and it was decided to abandon the distribution of food to beggars. That night I had the following dream: Bhagavan's Hall was full of devotees. On the sofa appeared a small creature which gradually grew until it became a huge, bright-red horse. The horse went round the Hall, sniffing at each devotee in turn. I was afraid he would come near me, but the horse went to Bhagavan, licked him all over the body and disappeared. Bhagavan called me near and asked me not to be afraid. A divine perfume emanated from him. He said: "Don't think it is an ordinary horse. As soon as the flags are hoisted at Arunachaleshwara Temple for the Kartikai festival, gods come down to partake in the celebrations. They join the crowd and some mix with the beggars at the Ashram gate. So never stop feeding sadhus and beggars at festivals." I told the dream to Chinnaswami Swami, and that day he ordered seven measures of rice to be cooked for the beggars.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #129 on: November 20, 2012, 07:23:04 PM »

At about 4 p.m. Sri Bhagavan, who was writing something intently, turned his eyes slowly towards the window to the north; he closed the fountain pen with the cap and put it in its case; he closed the notebook and put it aside; he removed his spectacles, folded them in the case and left them aside. He leaned back a little, looked up overhead, turned his face this way and that and looked here and there. He passed his hand over his face and looked contemplative. Then he turned to someone in the hall and said softly: "The pair of sparrows just came here and complained to me that their nest had been removed. I looked up and found their nest missing." Then he called for the attendant, Madhava Swami, and asked: "Madhava, did anyone remove the sparrows' nest?"
The attendant, who walked in leisurely, answered with an air of unconcern: "I removed the nests as often as they were built. I removed the last one this very afternoon."
M: That's it. That is why the sparrows complained. The poor little ones! How they take the pieces of straw and shreds in their tiny beaks and struggle to build their nests!
Attendant: But why should they build here, over our heads?
M: Well-well. Let us see who succeeds in the end. (After a short time Sri Bhagavan went out.) — Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi,
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #130 on: November 21, 2012, 04:06:14 PM »
At the time when the asram hall was being constructed, the attendants also used to carry stones to the site. One day an attendant Rangaswami’s finger was crushed when a stone fell on it. Till the finger was fully healed, Ramana himself took over the work of carrying stones.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #131 on: November 21, 2012, 04:10:22 PM »
Sri N. Ramachandra Rao of Bangalore, who visited Sri Ramana in 1923, says in his Kannada book that he saw Sri Ramana living in a shed and that he garlanded the sage’s photo hung in the shed and that many devotees were living in the premises and getting up at 4:00 a.m. to attend the various items of work in the kitchen. It was in that shed that Sri Ramana was sleeping on 26-6-1924. Personal attendants were resting in adjacent sheds. During the night, six robbers easily broke open the bamboo door and entered the hut and attacked him without any difference and commanded his to deliver the keys to them. They slapped him on cheeks and said, “Give us your keys. Where have you kept money? If you do not give keys, we will break your legs.” Sri Ramana continued to be as serene as before. In his soft voice, he replied, “We are poor sadhus. We have no money. You can take away anything you want.” By then the attendants ran out from their sheds and entered his shed. They were also attacked by the robbers. Some asram dogs barked at the robbers, who punished the dogs too. His attendants wanted to teach a lesson to the robbers by counter-attack. Sri Ramana gave them a counsel of perfection. He persuaded them to be non-violent. He told them to treat the robbers as themselves. Subsequently, his attendants, on being questioned by others, recollected the very words uttered by Sri Ramana and thus helped future biographers of the sage to record them in their books. On that night, when his attendants were about the punish the robbers, he checked them by saying, “Look here, we are sadhus. We should not abandon our dharma. These robbers are also human beings like ourselves. But, they are under the sway of ignorance. Our own teeth sometimes bite our tongue. Do we therefore break our teeth? Do not attack the robbers.” This incident shows Sri Ramana’s imperturbable calmness. It also shows that he treated the robbers as his own self.

Life and Teachings of Sree Ramana Maharshi
T. S. Anantha Murthy
Electron Printers, Bangalore, 1972
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #132 on: November 21, 2012, 09:30:39 PM »
Annamalai Swami

“I have decided to leave the ashram,” I said. “I want to go to Palakottu to live alone and meditate.”

“Ah! Very good! Very good! Very good!” exclaimed Bhagavan. The decision clearly had his approval. How could it be otherwise since it was Bhagavan himself who gave me the experience which precipitated the decision?

After getting Bhagavan’s permission I packed my possessions and locked my room. I also locked all the other places that were in my charge. I took the bunch of keys to Chinnaswami and told him, “I have decided to go and live in Palakottu. Please take these keys and keep them.”

Chinnaswami was, quite naturally, very surprised. “Why are you leaving?” he asked. “You have constructed all these buildings. You have done so much here. How can you go after doing all this work? Where will you sleep? How will you eat? You will have many troubles because you have no way of supporting yourself. Don’t go, stay here.”

I told him that I would not change my mind. I also tried to give him the keys but he refused to accept them. I didn’t want another argument with him so I just handed over the keys to Subramaniam, who was also in the office, and left.

It was an abrupt change in my life. Within a few hours of having the experience I was walking to Palakottu, knowing full well that I had left all of my old working life behind me.”
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #133 on: November 22, 2012, 04:22:17 PM »
Markadamma was a cook for many visitors
to Tiruvannamalai.  She prepared food and gave it to them for some
payments for her living.  Lakshmanaswami and other devotees had
this arrangment.  But when a devotee was an advanced soul, she
wanted to embrace them for getting their grace and blessings!
She tried with Lakshmanaswami on a few occasions.  More than
anything, she tried to embrace Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi and
on a few occasions she even succeeded!  She goes to Bhagavan's
hall, prostrates and suddenly feels restless and in order to suppress
her emotions, she goes out to the foothills and walks for a while
Again she comes back, prostrates and becomes restless and so on.
On a few occasions, she embraced Bhagavan.  After seeing this
on a couple of occasions, Bhagavan's attendants became furious and
guarded Bhagavan against her and even drove her out of the hall.
She was not caring a bit.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #134 on: November 22, 2012, 04:27:55 PM »
Once a devotee asked  Bhagavan Ramana:

"What is the purport of Namaskaram, prostration?"

Bhagavan said:

" A true prostration is the prostration of the 'ego' to the Atma.
The true meaning is that Guru or God will not be deceived by
your namaskarams.  They will only see whether you ego is
subdued or not."

Once another devotee asked for some food from the leaf plate
of Bhagavan Ramana, as a prasad.  (Some others have also
asked for remnants of the food, left on the leaf plate.)

Bhagavan Ramana replied, with all compassion:

"Please eat your food without ego.  Then all that you eat will be
Guru Prasadam."

(Source:  Maharshi Voi Mozhi - Tamil.)
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya