Author Topic: Life, wisdom, knowledge  (Read 3141 times)

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Life, wisdom, knowledge
« on: April 12, 2012, 06:53:12 PM »
Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?

T. S. Eliot


Salutations to Bhagavan
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2012, 08:25:10 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Again T.S. Eliot!

What are the roots that clutch,

what branches grow out of this stony rubbish,

Son of Man, for you know only a heap of broken images,

where sun beats, Dead trees give no shelter and cricket no relief!   


Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2012, 07:57:52 AM »
Sir, I share more nice quotes of TS Eliot that are directly relevant to us Sadhakas -

Thus with most careful devotion
Thus with precise attention
To detail, interfering preparation
Of that which is already prepared
Men tighten the knot of confusion
Into perfect misunderstanding




In my beginning is my end.



The endless cycle of idea and action,
Endless invention, endless experiment,
Brings knowledge of motion, but not of stillness;
Knowledge of speech, but not of silence;
Knowledge of words, and ignorance of The Word.



I believe the moment of birth
Is when we have knowledge of death



Half the harm that is done in this world
Is due to people who want to feel important.
They don't mean to do harm — but the harm does not interest them.
Or they do not see it, or they justify it
Because they are absorbed in the endless struggle
To think well of themselves.



Your burden is not to clear your conscience
But to learn how to bear the burdens on your conscience.



An awareness of solitude.



Disillusion can become itself an illusion
If we rest in it.



If we all were judged according to the consequences
Of all our words and deeds, beyond the intention
And beyond our limited understanding
Of ourselves and others, we should all be condemned.



Only by acceptance of the past will you alter its meaning.



Every moment is a fresh beginning.



Salutations to Bhagavan
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 08:27:12 AM »
Nagaraj,
Truly wise sayings.I have not read T S Eliot before.Thanks very much.
Here is an excerpt from the Chapter 'Four -aids' in Sri Aurobindo's 'Synthesis of Yoga'-Just reading this chapter will help clear a lot of doubts that any seeker will possibly have regarding Sadhana:
Quote
"Yoga-siddhi, the perfection that comes from the practice of Yoga, can be best attained by the combined working of four great instruments. There is, first, the knowledge of the truths, principles, powers and processes that govern the realisation -- sastra. Next comes a patient and persistent action on the lines laid down by the knowledge, the force of our personal effort -- utsaha. There intervenes, third, uplifting our knowledge and effort into the domain of spiritual experience, the direct suggestion, example and influence of the Teacher -- guru. Last comes the instrumentality of Time -- kala; for in all things there is a cycle of their action and a period of the divine movement.
     The supreme Shastra of the integral Yoga is the eternal Veda secret in the heart of every thinking and living being. The lotus of the eternal knowledge and the eternal perfection is a bud closed and folded up within us. It opens swiftly or gradually, petal by petal, through successive realisations, once the mind of man begins to turn towards the Eternal, once his heart, no longer compressed and confined by attachment to finite appearances, becomes enamoured, in whatever degree, of the Infinite. All life, all thought, all energising of the faculties, all experiences passive or active, become thenceforward so many shocks which disintegrate the teguments of the soul and remove the obstacles to the inevitable efflorescence. He who chooses the Infinite has been chosen by the Infinite. He has received the divine touch without which there is no awakening, no opening of the spirit; but once it is received, attainment is sure, whether conquered swiftly in the course of one human life or pursued patiently through many stadia of the cycle of existence in the manifested universe.
     Nothing can be taught to the mind which is not already concealed as potential knowledge in the unfolding soul of the creature. So also all perfection of which the outer man is capable, is only a realising of the eternal perfection of the Spirit within him. We know the Divine and become the Divine, because we are That already in our secret nature. All teaching is a revealing, all becoming is an unfolding. Self-attainment is the secret; self-knowledge and an increasing consciousness are the means and the process.

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2012, 09:22:06 AM »
Dear Sri Ravi,

TS Eliot is someone perhaps like our own Kannadasan, i felt...  :)

I've been reading, your posts on Sri Ramakrishna and Sir Aurobindo, I must admit, that, both, the posts on Sri Ramakrishna and Sri Aurobindo, does require another read. it is taking some time for me to ease myself with with the life of Sri Ramakrishna and Sri Aurobindo, so as to get a grasp of the real essence deep within, and not just the outer layer alone.

However, I have read quite of bit, the works and talks of Swami Vivekananda, which i felt more acquainted with easily. I am at a loss to understand, why so! In the same, I am slightly familiar with the quotes and sayings of The Mother, as my extended family were devotees of the mother and had some really thought provoking collections of Mother's sayings. It is only now, i  have begun reading about Sri Aurobindo, thanks to you.

Sri Ramakrishna is such an enigmatic mystic, unseen before. Truly we can never attribute him as 'anything' It would be a suicidal attempt to do so.

....am still reading....  :)

Salutations to Bhagavan
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 09:24:52 AM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2012, 09:51:55 AM »
Nagaraj,
Yes Kannadasan is supremely gifted.Master TGN has moved with him.He used to narrate this song-'poojiyathile oru rajiyathai Andukondu puriyAmale iruppAn oruvan,purithukondAl avanthAn iRaivan'-See the underlying theme so wonderfully brought out by this gifted poet-that 'the unknown'(the one in poojiyam) is the 'manifest God'(iRaivan).
Quote
it is taking some time for me to ease myself with with the life of Sri Ramakrishna and Sri Aurobindo, so as to get a grasp of the real essence deep within, and not just the outer layer alone.

True understanding comes from within.It does not come about by exercising the intellect.I have posted this in the 'Gita online' thread-what Sri Nolini kanta Gupta has advised-This has been my experience as well.
I recall how when i got exposed to the Beethoven violin Concerto(One of the Great pieces of music ever composed),I could not make sense of anything.I just said to myself-'Beethoven is truly communicating something.It is I who am not getting it'.I just did not struggle to understand what it was.I kept hearing that piece of music with an open mind and gradually like a small bubble rising from within and growing bigger and bigger,the themes emerged ,the linking,the inner meaning and the Robust expression-what used to be repetition now seemed a pulsating Refrain that captured the Heart and I could see the Beauty and Grandeur of Beethoven's muse.

What is needed is intuition and not intellectual grasp.

Wish you the Very Best.

Namaskar.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2012, 10:16:38 AM »
Nagaraj,

Quote
Quote
I am slightly familiar with the quotes and sayings of The Mother, as my extended family were devotees of the mother and had some really thought provoking collections of Mother's sayings

Yes,Mother's sayings are very lucid-the emphasis will be on Trust,openness and surrender.Mother is indeed a Great soul.Nagaraj,you may be interested in Mother's Commentary on Dhammapada.

For  years now,I have not been reading anything except The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna-I read this wonderful book as it puts one directly at the feet of The Great Master.It is for this companionship,satsangha.

Namaskar.

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2012, 11:19:43 AM »
Dear Sri Ravi,

What a joy, to listen to such wonderful song. Here I reproduce the same with my very poor english translation:

பூஜ்ஜியத்துகுள்ளே ஒரு ராஜ்ஜியத்தை ஆண்டு கொண்டு
புரியாமலே இருப்பான் ஒருவன் - அவ்னைப்
புரிந்து கொண்டால் அவன்தான் இறைவன்

poojiyathukulle oru raajiyathai aandu kondu
puriyaamale irupuaan oruvan
avanai purindhu kondaal
avandhaan iraivan

Ruling the kingdom of nothing,
who remains uncomprehended,
If you comprehend Him, He is only God

தென்னை இளநீருக்குள்ளே தேங்கியுள்ள ஓட்டுக்குள்ளே
தேங்காயைப் போலிருப்பான் ஒருவன் - அவனைத்
தெரிந்து கொண்டால் அவன்தான் இறைவன்

thennai ilaineerukullae
thaengiulla otukullae
thaengayai pol irupaan oruvan
avanai therindhu kondaal
avan thaan iraivan

within the water of a tender coconut,
within the inner shell,
but seems like just a coconut,
If you comprehend Him, he is only God

முற்றும் கசந்ததென்று பற்றறுத்து வந்தவர்க்கு
சுற்றம் என நின்றிருப்பான் ஒருவன் - அவனைத்
தொடர்ந்து சென்றால் அவன்தான் இறைவன்

muttrum kasandhadhu endru
patru aruthu vandhavarukku
suttram ena nindrirupaan oruvan
avanai thodarndhu sendraal
avan thaan iraivan

One who begins to experience aversion, dispassion and thereby who becomes detached,
remains/stands untouched, which is so very close, if you persistently follow this light, he is only God

கோழிக்குள் முட்டை வைத்து முட்டைக்குள் கோழி வைத்து
வாழைக்கும் கன்று வைத்தான் ஒருவன் - அந்த
ஏழையின் பேர் உலகில் இறைவன்

kozhikul muttai vaithu
muttaikul kozhi vaithu
vaazhaikkum kandru vaithaan oruvan
andha ezhaiyin per
ulagil iraivan

He made Egg come from hen, and also hen come from egg,
he also planted banana sapling (Bananas sprout from the female flowers without pollination - same like the hen egg quest)
That poor fellow is one
who is known as God n this world

Salutations to Bhagavan
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 11:23:42 AM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2012, 04:56:28 PM »
Nagaraj,
Thanks very much for the Kannadasan's song and the translation.
Here are more excerpts from the 'Four Aids' chapter in Sri Aurobindo's Synthesis of Yoga:
Quote
For the Sadhaka of the Integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, -- if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the written Truth, -- sabdabrahmativartate -- beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, -- srotaryasya srutasya ca. For he is not the Sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a Sadhaka of the Infinite.

   
Quote
An integral and synthetic Yoga needs especially not to be bound by any written or traditional Shastra; for while it embraces the knowledge received from the past, it seeks to organise it anew for the present and the future. An absolute liberty of experience and of the restatement of knowledge in new terms and new combinations is the condition of its self-formation. Seeking to embrace all life in itself, it is in the position not of a pilgrim following the highroad to his destination, but, to that extent at least, of a path-finder hewing his way through a virgin forest. For Yoga has long diverged from life and the ancient systems which sought to embrace it, such as those of our Vedic forefathers, are far away from us, expressed in terms which are no longer accessible, thrown into forms which are no longer applicable. Since then mankind has moved forward on the current of eternal Time and the same problem has to be approached from a new starting-point.
    By this Yoga we not only seek the Infinite, but we call upon the Infinite to unfold himself in human life. Therefore the Shastra of our Yoga must provide for an infinite liberty in the receptive human soul. A free adaptability in the manner and type of the individual's acceptance of the Universal and Transcendent into himself is the right condition for the full spiritual life in man. Vivekananda, pointing out that the unity of all religions must necessarily express itself by an increasing richness of variety in its forms, said once that the perfect state of that essential unity would come when each man had his own religion, when not bound by sect or traditional form he followed the free self-adaptation of his nature in its relations with the Supreme. So also one may say that the perfection of the integral Yoga will come when each mall is able to follow his own path of Yoga, pursuing the development of his own nature in its upsurging towards that which transcends the nature. For freedom is the final law and the last consummation.

Quote
The development of the experience in its rapidity, its amplitude, the intensity and power of its results, depends primarily, in the beginning of the path and long after, on the aspiration and personal effort of the Sadhaka. The process of Yoga is a turning of the human soul from the egoistic state of consciousness absorbed in the outward appearances and attractions of things to a higher state in which the Transcendent and Universal can pour itself into the individual mould and transform it. The first determining element of the siddhi is, therefore, the intensity of the turning, the force which directs the soul inward. The power of aspiration of the heart, the force of the will, the concentration of the mind, the perseverance and determination of the applied energy are the measure of that intensity. The ideal Sadhaka should be able to say in the Biblical phrase, "My zeal for the Lord has eaten me up." It is this zeal for the Lord, utsaha, the zeal of the whole nature for its divine results, vyakulata, the heart's eagerness for the attainment of the Divine, -- that devours the ego and breaks up the limitations of its petty and narrow mould for the full and wide reception of that which it seeks, that which, being universal, exceeds and, being transcendent, surpasses even the largest and highest individual self and nature.
     But this is only one side of the force that works for perfection. The process of the integral Yoga has three stages, not indeed sharply distinguished or separate, but in a certain measure successive. There must be, first, the effort towards at least an initial and enabling self-transcendence and contact with the Divine; next, the reception of that which transcends, that with which we have gained communion, into ourselves for the transformation of our whole conscious being; last, the utilisation of our transformed humanity as a divine centre in the world. So long as the contact with the Divine is not in some considerable degree established, so long as there is not some measure of sustained identity, sayujga, the element of personal effort must normally predominate. But in proportion as this contact establishes itself, the Sadhaka must become conscious that a force other than his own, a force transcending his egoistic endeavour and capacity, is at work in him and to this Power he learns progressively to submit himself and delivers up to it the charge of his Yoga. In the end his own will and force become one with the higher Power; he merges them in the divine Will and its transcendent and universal Force.

continued.....


Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2012, 05:03:47 PM »
Excerpts from Sri Aurobindo's Synthesis of Yoga continued:
     
Quote
Always indeed it is the higher Power that acts. Our sense of personal effort and aspiration comes from the attempt of the egoistic mind to identify itself in a wrong and imperfect way with the workings of the divine Force. It persists in applying to experience on a supernormal plane the ordinary terms of mentality which it applies to its normal experiences in the world. In the world we act with the sense of egoism; we claim the universal forces that work in us as our own; we claim as the effect of our personal will, wisdom, force, virtue the selective, formative, progressive action of the Transcendent in this frame of mind, life and body. Enlightenment brings to us the knowledge that the ego is only an instrument; we begin to perceive and feel that these things are our own in the sense that they belong to our supreme and integral Self, one with the Transcendent, not to the instrumental ego. Our limitations and distortions are our contribution to the working; the true power in it is the Divine's. When the human ego realises that its will is a tool, its wisdom ignorance and childishness, its power an infant's groping, its virtue a pretentious impurity, and learns to trust itself to that which transcends it, that is its salvation. The apparent freedom and self-assertion of our personal being to which we are so profoundly attached, conceal a most pitiable subjection to a thousand suggestions, impulsions, forces which we have made extraneous to our little person. Our ego, boasting of freedom, is at every moment the slave, toy and puppet of countless beings, powers, forces, influences in universal Nature. The self-abnegation of the ego in the Divine is its self-fulfillment; its surrender to that which transcends it is its liberation from bonds and limits and its perfect freedom.
     But still, in the practical development, each of the three stages has its necessity and utility and must be given its time or its place. It will not do, it cannot be safe or effective to begin with the last and highest alone. It would not be the right course, either, to leap prematurely from one to another. For even if from the beginning we recognise in mind and heart the Supreme, there are elements of the nature which long prevent the recognition from becoming realisation. But without realisation our mental belief cannot become a dynamic reality; it is still only a figure of knowledge, not a living truth, an idea, not yet a power. And even if realisation has begun, it may be dangerous to imagine or to assume too soon that we are altogether in the hands of the Supreme or are acting as his instrument. That assumption may introduce a calamitous falsity; it may produce a helpless inertia or, magnifying the movements of the ego with the Divine Name, it may disastrously distort and ruin the whole course of the Yoga. There is a period, more or less prolonged, of internal effort and struggle in which the individual will has to reject the darkness and distortions of the lower nature and to put itself resolutely or vehemently on the side of the divine Light. The mental energies, the heart's emotions, the vital desires, the very physical being have to be compelled into the right attitude or trained to admit and answer to the right influences. It is only then, only when this has been truly done, that the surrender of the lower to the higher can be effected, because the sacrifice has become acceptable.
    The personal will of the Sadhaka has first to seize on the egoistic energies and turn them towards the light and the right; once turned, he has still to train them to recognise that always, always to accept, always to follow that. Progressing, he learns, still using the personal will, personal effort, personal energies, to employ them as representatives of the higher Power and in conscious obedience to the higher Influence. Progressing yet farther, his will, effort, energy become no longer personal and separate, but activities of that higher Power and Influence at work in the individual. But there is still a sort of gulf of distance which necessitates an obscure process of transit, not always accurate, sometimes even very distorting, between the divine Origin and the emerging human current. At the end of the progress, with the progressive disappearance of egoism and impurity and ignorance, this last separation is removed; all in the individual becomes the divine working.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2012, 05:12:57 PM »
Excerpts from Sri Aurobindo's Synthesis of Yoga continued:
Quote
The full recognition of this inner Guide, Master of the Yoga, lord, light, enjoyer and goal of all sacrifice and effort, is of the utmost importance in the path of integral perfection. It is immaterial whether he is first seen as an impersonal Wisdom, Love and Power behind all things, as an Absolute manifesting in. the relative and attracting it, as one's highest Self and the highest Self of all, as a Divine Person within us and in the world, in one of his -- or her -- numerous forms and names or as the ideal which the mind conceives. In the end we perceive that he is all and more than all these things together- The mind's door of entry to the conception of him must necessarily vary according to the past evolution and the present nature.
     This inner Guide is often veiled at first by the very intensity of our personal effort and by the ego's preoccupation with itself and its aims. As we gain in clarity and the turmoil of egoistic effort gives place to a calmer self-knowledge, we recognise the source of the growing light within us. We recognise it retrospectively as we realise how all our obscure and conflicting movements have been determined towards an end that we only now begin to perceive, how even before our entrance into the path of the Yoga the evolution of our life has been designedly led towards its turning point. For now we begin to understand the sense of our struggles and efforts, successes and failures. At last we are able to seize the meaning of our ordeals and sufferings and can appreciate the help that was given us by all that hurt and resisted and the utility of our very falls and stumblings. We recognise this divine leading afterwards, not retrospectively but immediately, in the moulding of our thoughts by a transcendent Seer, of our will and actions by an all-embracing Power, of our emotional life by an all-attracting and all-assimilating Bliss and Love. We recognise it too in a more personal relation that from the first touched us or at the last seizes us; we feel the eternal presence of a supreme Master, Friend, Lover, Teacher. We recognise it in the essence of our being as that develops into likeness and oneness with a greater and wider existence; for we perceive that this miraculous development is not the result of our own efforts; an eternal Perfection is moulding us into its own image. One who is the Lord or Ishwara of the Yogic philosophies, the Guide in the conscious being (caitya guru or antaryamin), the Absolute of the thinker, the Unknowable of the Agnostic, the universal Force of the materialist, the supreme Soul and the supreme shakti, the One who is differently named and imaged by the religions, is the Master of our Yoga.
     To see, know, become and fulfil this One in our inner selves and in all our outer nature, was always the secret goal and becomes now the conscious purpose of our embodied existence.

   
Quote
  But while it is difficult for man to believe in something unseen within himself, it is easy for him to believe in something which he can image as extraneous to himself. The spiritual progress of most human beings demands an extraneous support, an object of faith outside us. It needs an external image of God; or it needs a human representative, -- Incarnation, Prophet or Guru; or it demands both and receives them. For according to the need of the human soul the Divine manifests himself as deity, as human divine or in simple humanity, -- using that thick disguise, which so successfully conceals the Godhead, for a means of transmission of his guidance.
     The Hindu discipline of spirituality provides for this need of the soul by the conceptions of the Ishta Devata, the Avatar and the Gum. By the Ishta Devata, the chosen deity, is meant, -- not some inferior Power, but a name and form of the transcendent and universal Godhead. Almost all religions either have as their base or make use of some such name and form of the Divine. Its necessity for the human soul is evident. God is the All and more than the All. But that which is more than the All, how shall man conceive? And even the All is at first too hard for him; for he himself in his active consciousness is a limited and selective formation and can open himself only to that which is in harmony with his limited nature. There are things in the All which are too hard for his comprehension or seem too terrible to his sensitive emotions and cowering sensations. Or, simply, he cannot conceive as the Divine, cannot approach or cannot recognise something that is too much out of the circle of his ignorant or partial conceptions. It is necessary for him to conceive God in his own image or at some form that is beyond himself but consonant with his highest tendencies and seizable by his feelings or his intelligence. Otherwise it would be difficult for him to come into contact and communion with the Divine.
     Even then his nature calls for a human intermediary so that he may feel the Divine in something entirely close to his own humanity and sensible in a human influence and example. This call is satisfied by the Divine manifest in a human appearance, the Incarnation, the Avatar-Krishna, Christ, Buddha. Or if this is too hard for him to conceive, the Divine represents himself through a less marvellous intermediary, -- Prophet or Teacher. For many who cannot conceive or are unwilling to accept the Divine Man, are ready to open themselves to the supreme man, terming him not incarnation but world-teacher or divine representative.
     This also is not enough; a living influence, a living example, a present instruction is needed. For it is only the few who can make the past Teacher and his teaching, the past Incarnation and his example and influence a living force in their lives. For this need also the Hindu discipline provides in the relation of the Guru and the disciple. The Guru may sometimes be the Incarnation or World-Teacher; but it is sufficient that he should represent to the disciple the divine wisdom, convey to him something of the divine ideal or make him feel the realised relation of the human soul with the Eternal.
     The Sadhaka of the integral Yoga will make use of all these aids according to his nature; but it is necessary that he should shun their limitations and cast from himself that exclusive tendency of egoistic mind which cries, "My God, my Incarnation, my Prophet, my Guru," and opposes it to all other realisation in a sectarian or a fanatical spirit. All sectarianism, all fanaticism must be shunned; for it is inconsistent with the integrity of the divine realisation.
     On the contrary, the Sadhaka of the integral Yoga will not be satisfied until he has included all other names and forms of Deity in his own conception, seen his own Ishta Devata in all others, unified all Avatars in the unity of Him who descends in the Avatar, welded the truth in all teachings into the harmony of the Eternal Wisdom.
     Nor should he forget the aim of these external aids which is to awaken his soul to the Divine within him. Nothing has been finally accomplished if that has not been accomplished. It is not sufficient to worship Krishna, Christ or Buddha without, if there is not the revealing and the formation of the Buddha, the Christ or Krishna in ourselves. And all other aids equally have no other purpose; each is a bridge between man's unconverted state and the revelation of the Divine within him.

continued....


Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4010
    • View Profile
Re: Life, wisdom, knowledge
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2012, 05:20:30 PM »
Excerpts from Sri Aurobindo's Synthesis of Yoga continued:
Quote
The Teacher of the integral Yoga will follow as far as he may the method of the Teacher within us. He will lead the disciple through the nature of the disciple. Teaching, example, influence, -- these are the three instruments of the Guru. But the wise Teacher will not seek to impose himself or his opinions on the passive acceptance of the receptive mind; he will throw in only what is productive and sure as a seed which will grow under the divine fostering within. He will seek to awaken much more than to instruct; he will aim at the growth of the faculties and the experiences by a natural process and free expansion. He will give a method as an aid, as a utilisable device, not as an imperative formula or a fixed routine. And he will be on his guard against any turning of the means into a limitation, against the mechanising of process. His whole business is to awaken the divine light and set working the divine force of which he himself is only a means and an aid, a body or a channel.
     The example is more powerful than the instruction; but it is not the example of the outward acts nor that of the personal character, which is of most importance. These have their place and their utility; but what will most stimulate aspiration in others is the central fact of the divine realisation within him governing his whole life and inner state and all his activities. This is the universal and essential element; the rest belongs to individual person and circumstance. It is this dynamic realisation that the Sadhaka must feel and reproduce in himself according to his own nature; he need not strive after an imitation from outside which may well be sterilising rather than productive of right and natural fruits.
     Influence is more important than example. Influence is not the outward authority of the Teacher over his disciple, but the power of his contact, of his presence, of the nearness of his soul to the soul of another, infusing into it, even though in silence, that which he himself is and possesses. This is the supreme sign of the Master. For the greatest Master is much less a Teacher than a Presence pouring the divine consciousness and its constituting light and power and purity and bliss into all who are receptive around him.
     And it shall also be a sign of the teacher of the integral Yoga that he does not arrogate to himself Guruhood in a humanly vain and self-exalting spirit. His work, if he has one, is a trust from above, he himself a channel, a vessel or a representative. He is a man helping his brothers, a child leading children, a Light kindling other lights, an awakened Soul awakening souls, at highest a Power or Presence of the Divine calling to him other powers of the Divine.

 
Quote
  The Sadhaka who has all these aids is sure of his goal. Even a fall will be for him only a means of rising and death a passage towards fulfilment. For once on his path, birth and death become only processes in the development of his being and the stages of his journey.
     Time is the remaining aid needed for the effectivity of the process. Time presents itself to human effort as an enemy or a friend, as a resistance, a medium or an instrument. But always it is really the instrument of the soul.
     Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal. Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument.
     The ideal attitude of the Sadhaka towards Time is to have an endless patience as if he had all eternity for his fulfillment and yet to develop the energy that shall realise now and with an ever-increasing mastery and pressure of rapidity till it reaches the miraculous instantaneousness of the supreme divine Transformation.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This has been a great help and source of inspiration for me and is offered here in that spirit with the trust that someone may find it useful as well.

Namaskar.