Author Topic: Rough Notebook-Open Forum  (Read 268077 times)

Hari

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
    • View Profile
    • Fundamental questions about mind
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #75 on: April 23, 2012, 11:07:34 AM »
Beautiful! Unfortunately most vaishnavas don't accept that apparantly.

As you know I live in a country and a world where christians and muslims are predominantly part of the society. The only thing they do you to try to convince the others that their path is right and it is the only way of salvation. They don't try to show people what good qualities to acquire, how to live in God's way, how to be a good person, how to respect others and so on. They only judge and judge and propagate their dogmas. They suggest a feel of guilt, fear and so on. They integrate people by fear, not by Love as Lord Jesus has taught. They "love" everyone until he or she share their theology. It is the same with so called ISKCON. We have many members here. They teach "Oh, it is ok to follow Jesus but you must accept that you follow inferior God and inevitably you will not be liberated this life. Mhhmmm, may be next time". It seems that religion and spirituality are two differents things.
Web Page dedicated to the Great Sages:
https://someoneelsebg.000webhostapp.com/Sages/HTML.html

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #76 on: April 23, 2012, 11:30:16 AM »
Dear i,

This is very prevalent here as well. it is an unfortunate aspect of the times we live in. According to Hindu shastras, we wre living in Kali Yuga, and intrinsically, we all have kind of accepted this aspect of times. There are separate scriptures which convey how religion, people will be in these times and what all to expect as well in the coming future. Things are only bound to deteriorate. As of now only about 5000 years of Kali Yuga is over, and there is still about 4,25,000 years left, before the pralaya, and the creation begins, once again.

Salutations to Bhagavan
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #77 on: April 23, 2012, 03:06:07 PM »
Friends,
An excerpt from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna:

Dogmatism in religion
MASTER (to Balaram's father and the others): "The Bhaktamala is one of the Vaishnava
books. It is a fine book. It describes the lives of the various Vaishnava devotees. But it is
one-sided. At one place the author found peace of mind only after compelling Bhagavati,
the Divine Mother, to take Her initiation according to the Vaishnava discipline.
"Once I spoke highly of Vaishnavcharan to Mathur and persuaded him to invite
Vaishnavcharan to his house. Mathur welcomed him with great courtesy. He fed his guest
from silver plates. Then do you know what happened? Vaishnav said in front of Mathur,
'You will achieve nothing whatsoever in spiritual life unless you accept Krishna as your
Ideal.' Mathur was a follower of the Sakta cult and a worshipper of the Divine Mother. At
once his face became crimson. I nudged Vaishnavcharan.
"I understand that the Bhagavata also contains some statements like that. I hear that it is
said there that trying to cross the ocean of the world without accepting Krishna as the Ideal
Deity is like trying to cross a great sea by holding the tail of a dog. Each sect magnifies its
own view.
"The Saktas, too, try to belittle the Vaishnavas. The Vaishnavas say that Krishna alone is
the Helmsman to take one across the ocean of the world. The Saktas retort: 'Oh, yes! We
agree to that. Our Divine Mother is the Empress of the Universe. Why should She bother
about a ferry-boat? Therefore She has engaged that fellow Krishna for the purpose.' (All
laugh.)
"Besides, how vain people are about their own sects! There are weavers in the villages near
Kamarpukur. Many of them are Vaishnavas and like to talk big. They say: 'Which Vishnu
does he worship? The Preserver? Oh, we wouldn't touch him!' Or: 'Which Siva are you
talking about? We accept the Atmaramasiva.' Or again, 'Please explain to us which Hari
you worship'. They spin their yarn and indulge in talk like that.
"Rati's mother, Rani Katyayani's favourite confidante, is a follower of Vaishnavcharan. She
is a bigoted Vaishnava. She used to visit me very frequently, and none could outdo her in
devotion. One day she noticed me eating the prasad from the Kali temple. Since then I
haven't seen even her shadow.
Master's harmony of religions
"He is indeed a real man who has harmonized everything. Most people are one-sided. But I
find that all opinions point to the One. All views-the Sakta, the Vaishnava, the Vedantahave
that One for their centre. He who is formless is, again, endowed with form. It is He
who appears in different forms: The attributeless Brahman is my Father. God with
attributes is my Mother. Whom shall I blame? Whom shall I praise? The two pans of the
scales are equally heavy.'
"He who is described in the Vedas is also described in the Tantras and the Puranas. All of
them speak about the one Satchidananda. The Nitya and the Lila are the two aspects of the
one Reality. It is described in the Vedas as 'Om Satchidananda Brahman', in the Tantras as
'Om Satchidananda Siva', the ever-pure Siva, and in the Puranas as 'Om Satchidananda
Krishna'. All the scriptures, the Vedas, the Puranas, and the Tantras, speak only of one
Satchidananda. It is stated in the Vaishnava scripture that it is Krishna Himself who has
become Kali."

Namaskar.

Hari

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
    • View Profile
    • Fundamental questions about mind
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2012, 06:18:54 PM »
Sri Ravi, what is Sri Ramakrishna's view about Buddha and Buddhism? Did He accep the man who didn't taught belief in God? If you want you can post your message in Buddhism topic in Bhagavan's teachings forum. This way more people interested in Buddhism will know it. Thank you in advance!
Web Page dedicated to the Great Sages:
https://someoneelsebg.000webhostapp.com/Sages/HTML.html

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #79 on: April 24, 2012, 06:47:17 AM »
An Excerpt from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna:

Fourth visit
The next day, too, was a holiday for M. He arrived at Dakshineswar at three o'clock in the
afternoon. Sri Ramakrishna was in his room; Narendra, Bhavanath, and a few other
devotees were sitting on a mat spread on the floor. They were all young men of nineteen or
twenty. Seated on the small couch, Sri Ramakrishna was talking with them and smiling.
No sooner had M. entered the room than the Master laughed aloud and said to the boys,
"There! He has come again." They all joined in the laughter. M. bowed low before him and
took a seat. Before this he had saluted the Master with folded hands, like one with an
English education. But that day he learnt to fall down at his feet in orthodox Hindu fashion.
The peacock and the opium
Presently the Master explained the cause of his laughter to the devotees, He said: "A man
once fed a peacock with a pill of opium at four o'clock in the afternoon. The next day,
exactly at that time, the peacock came back. It had felt the intoxication of the drug and
returned just in time to have another dose."(All laugh.)
M. thought this a very apt illustration. Even at home he had been unable to banish the
thought of Sri Ramakrishna for a moment. His mind was constantly at Dakshineswar and
he had counted the minutes until he should go again.
In the mean time the Master was having great fun with the boys, treating them as if they
were his most intimate friends. Peals of side-splitting laughter filled the room, as if it were
a mart of joy. The whole thing was a revelation to M. He thought: "Didn't I see him only
yesterday intoxicated with God? Wasn't he swimming then in the Ocean of Divine Love - a
sight I had never seen before? And today the same person is behaving like an ordinary man!
Wasn't it he who scolded me on the first day of my coming here? Didn't he admonish me,
saying, 'And you are a man of knowledge!'? Wasn't it he who said to me that God with
form is as true as God without form? Didn't he tell me that God alone is real and all else
illusory? Wasn't it he who advised me to live in the world unattached, like a maidservant in
a rich man's house?"
Sri Ramakrishna was having great fun with the young devotees; now and then he glanced at
M. He noticed that M. sat in silence. The Master said to Ramlal: "You see, he is a little
advanced in years, and therefore somewhat serious. He sits quiet while the youngsters are
making merry." M. was then about twenty-eight years old.
Hanuman's devotion to Rama
The conversation drifted to Hanuman, whose picture hung on the wall in the Master's room.
Sri Ramakrishna said: "Just imagine Hanuman's state of mind. He didn't care for money,
honour, creature comforts, or anything else. He longed only for God. When he was running
away with the heavenly weapon that had been secreted in the crystal pillar, Mandodari
began to tempt him with various fruits so that he might come down and drop the weapon.
But he couldn't be tricked so easily. In reply to her persuasions he sang this song:
Am I in need of fruit?
I have the Fruit that makes this life
Fruitful indeed. Within my heart
The Tree of Rama grows,
Bearing salvation for its fruit.
Under the Wish-fulfilling Tree
Of Rama do I sit at ease,
Plucking whatever fruit I will.
But if you speak of fruit -
No beggar, I, for common fruit.
Behold, I go,
Leaving a bitter fruit for you."
As Sri Ramakrishna was singing the song he went into samadhi. Again the half-closed eyes
and motionless body that one sees in his photograph. Just a minute before, the devotees had
been making merry in his company. Now all eyes were riveted on him. Thus for the second
time M. saw the Master in samadhi.
After a long time the Master came back to ordinary consciousness. His face lighted up with
a smile, and his body relaxed; his senses began to function in a normal way. He shed tears
of joy as he repeated the holy name of Rama. M. wondered whether this very saint was the
person who a few minutes earlier had been behaving like a child of five.
The Master said to Narendra and M., "I should like to hear you speak and argue in
English." They both laughed. But they continued to talk in their mother tongue. It was
impossible for M. to argue any more before the Master. Though Ramakrishna insisted, they
did not talk in English.

Namaskar.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #80 on: April 25, 2012, 08:24:32 AM »
Friends,
Today I will share a wonderful Reminiscence of Manmathanath Ganguli ,a disciple of Swami Vivekananda.Quite often,I find that persons read some stray saying or worse,some 'hearsay' or worst some misquotes from unreliable sources on the Life and Teachings of Sri Ramakrishna or Swami Vivekananda,and these are quite misleading.It is very necessary for the genuine seeker to keep an open mind and not form 'opinions' based on such unreliable sources of information.Let us now get back to the Reminiscence of Ganguli:
Swamiji asked me, "What is that you want to know from me? You may put any question you like."
 I said, "I have seen your lectures on maya. It has appealed to me. But I have not understood it. Please let me know what is maya. For a
while he was silent. Then he said, "If you have anything else to know, you can ask me." I said, "Sir, I have nothing more to ask. If a knower of Brahman like you cannot enlighten me, then it
will remain a closed book to me during this life."

" At this Swamiji began a discourse on maya. He was speaking fast and I followed his words and the logic. By and by, my mind lost the
contact of the sense-organs. I experienced a subtle world around me which was much finer than the gross world. I could see with my open eyes the Math, the trees, and everything before me vibrating. If you look above a large fire you can see a vibration. The objects were oscillating and vibrating before my eyes just like that. I was conscious of my uncommon experience and asked myself, "What is this that I see?" I looked around me and saw there was vibration everywhere. Slowly even Swamiji vanished from my eyes. Even then I could hear his voice, but I did not follow its meaning. Then suddenly I was aware of a vibration within my brain and there was only the void. Again I could see and hear the Swami and then followed the meaning as well. But my mind was conscious of my ego, and it no more exerted as it did before as I thought that I knew the meaning of maya.
I, who never had the courage to speak before the Swami, considered myself a bubble in the ocean of maya in which the Swami was also another. The difference was lost to me for the moment. The giant personality of the Swami and his great spiritual power and everything seemed to be a coincidence in the ocean that Swamiji called maya. But it was nothing but an undivided chit — the Cosmic Consciousness.
Then I said, "Swamiji, you are also in the maya. Your activities of the Math, schools, daridranarayanaseva (service of God in the poor), hospitals, the Mission — everything is maya. What is the need of all this? You yourself are within the meshes of maya."
At this he smiled and kept quiet for some time. It was through his grace that I considered myself as one with the maya. And now again I entered the little shell of my own self. I saw the Math, the Swami, and everything once again in its true perspective, i.e. the one I was used to have before this experience. A little time before I had spoken with a high pitched voice and that in a piquant manner, and now I was ashamed of having done so. Swamiji and myself were
not of the same substance any more and I felt the vast difference. Swamiji must have known that now I was normal once again. Then, he said. "Yes; you have
said aright. I am playing with maya. If you do not like this play of maya, you can go to a deep cave of the Himalayas. There you can get yourself lost in, tapasya (spiritual effort).
"
It was high time for lunch and everyone was kept waiting. Swamiji stood up and I fell prostrate at his feel. He was Shiva in person, and I touched his feet.
It was then that I had the desire to have prasada from Swamiji. But I said nothing. Swamiji was pacing in front of the open verandah before the store-room. He went to the room and took an apple and asked for a knife from a Bramhacharin. Slowly he peeled the apple and then cut a slice. He came near me and offered the slice to me. I was gratified. Then he took a piece himself. Then I wished to have anna-prasada from Swamiji. A little later when we were all seated for the midday lunch. Swamiji asked a Bramhacharin to come to him and he said. "Take this cooked rice to Manmatha." It had been offered to Shri Ramakrishna.

Can we even understand why these Great ones come to this terra firma and what their mission is?it is enough if we look around and see the wonder of it all-How many earnest seekers are drawn to become renunciants and to a life of total selfless service.The Great ones come to revive waning Dharma and through their lives and teachings breathe fresh vitality and spirit into near dead ways of dharma.
Namaskar.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #81 on: April 26, 2012, 06:56:15 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...
While practising the discipline of the madhur bhava, the male devotee often regards himself
as a woman, in order to develop the most intense form of love for Sri Krishna, the only
purusha, or man, in the universe. This assumption of the attitude of the opposite sex has a
deep psychological significance. It is a matter of common experience that an idea may be
cultivated to such an intense degree that every idea alien to it is driven from the mind. This
peculiarity of the mind may he utilised for the subjugation of the lower desires and the
development of the spiritual nature. Now, the idea which is the basis of all desires and
passions in a man is the conviction of his indissoluble association with a male body. If he
can inoculate himself thoroughly with the idea that he is a woman, he can get rid of the
desires peculiar to his male body. Again, the idea that he is a woman may in turn be made
to give way to another higher idea, namely, that he is neither man nor woman, but the
Impersonal Spirit. The Impersonal Spirit alone can enjoy real communion with the
Impersonal God. Hence the highest realization of the Vaishnava draws close to the
transcendental experience of the Vedantist.
A beautiful expression of the Vaishnava worship of God through love is to be found in the
Vrindavan episode of the Bhagavata. The gopis, or milk-maids, of Vrindavan regarded the
six-year-old Krishna as their Beloved. They sought no personal gain or happiness from this
love. They surrendered to Krishna their bodies, minds, and souls. Of all the gopis, Radhika,
or Radha, because of her intense love for Him, was the closest to Krishna. She manifested
mahabhava and was united with her Beloved. This union represents, through sensuous
language, a supersensuous experience.
Sri Chaitanya, also known as Gauranga, Gora, or Nimai, born in Bengal in 1485 and
regarded as an Incarnation of God, is a great prophet of the Vaishnava religion. Chaitanya
declared the chanting of God's name to be the most efficacious spiritual discipline for the
Kaliyuga.
Sri Ramakrishna, as the monkey Hanuman, had already worshipped God as his Master.
Through his devotion to Kali he had worshipped God as his Mother. He was now to take up
the other relationships prescribed by the Vaishnava scriptures.

continued...

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #82 on: April 26, 2012, 06:59:53 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna...

Ramlala
About the year 1864 there came to Dakshineswar a wandering Vaishnava monk, Jatadhari,
whose Ideal Deity was Rama. He always carried with him a small metal image of the Deity,
which he called by the endearing name of Ramlala, the Boy Rama. Toward this little image
he displayed the tender affection of Kausalya for her divine Son, Rama. As a result of
lifelong spiritual practice he had actually found in the metal image the presence of his Ideal.
Ramlala was no longer for him a metal image, but the living God. He devoted himself to
nursing Rama, feeding Rama, playing with Rama, taking Rama for a walk, and bathing
Rama. And he found that the image responded to his love.
Sri Ramakrishna, much impressed with his devotion, requested Jatadhari to spend a few
days at Dakshineswar. Soon Ramlala became the favourite companion of Sri Ramakrishna
too. Later on he described to the devotees how the little image would dance gracefully
before him, jump on his back, insist on being taken in his arms, run to the fields in the sun,
pluck flowers from the bushes, and play pranks like a naughty boy. A very sweet
relationship sprang up between him and Ramlala, for whom he felt the love of a mother.
One day Jatadhari requested Sri Ramakrishna to keep the image and bade him adieu with
tearful eyes. He declared that Ramlala had fulfilled his innermost prayer and that he now
had no more need of formal worship. A few days later Sri Ramakrishna was blessed
through Ramlala with a vision of Ramachandra, whereby he realized that the Rama of the
Ramayana, the son of Dasaratha, pervades the whole universe as Spirit and Consciousness;
that He is its Creator, Sustainer, and Destroyer; that, in still another aspect, He is the
transcendental Brahman, without form, attribute, or name.
While worshipping Ramlala as the Divine Child, Sri Ramakrishna's heart became filled
with motherly tenderness, and he began to regard himself as a woman. His speech and
gestures changed. He began to move freely with the ladies of Mathur's family, who now
looked upon him as one of their own sex. During this time he worshipped the Divine
Mother as Her companion or handmaid.

To be continued...

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #83 on: April 27, 2012, 06:35:24 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...

In Communion with the Divine Beloved
Sri Ramakrishna now devoted himself to scaling the most inaccessible and dizzy heights of
dualistic worship, namely, the complete union with Sri Krishna as the Beloved of the heart.
He regarded himself as one of the gopis of Vrindavan, mad with longing for her divine
Sweetheart. At his request Mathur provided him with woman's dress and jewellery. In this
love pursuit, food and drink were forgotten. Day and night he wept bitterly. The yearning
turned into a mad frenzy; for the divine Krishna began to play with him the old tricks He
had played with the gopis. He would tease and taunt, now and then revealing Himself, but
always keeping at a distance. Sri Ramakrishna's anguish brought on a return of the old
physical symptoms: the burning sensation, an oozing of blood through the pores, a
loosening of the joints, and the stopping of physiological functions.
The Vaishnava scriptures advise one to propitiate Radha and obtain her grace in order to
realize Sri Krishna. So the tortured devotee now turned his prayer to her. Within a short
time he enjoyed her blessed vision. He saw and felt the figure of Radha disappearing into
his own body.
He said later on: "It is impossible to describe the heavenly beauty and sweetness of Radha.
Her very appearance showed that she had completely forgotten herself in her passionate
attachment to Krishna. Her complexion was a light yellow."
Now one with Radha, he manifested the great ecstatic love, the mahabhava which had
found in her its fullest expression. Later Sri Ramakrishna said: "The manifestation in the
same individual of the nineteen different kinds of emotion for God is called, in the books
on bhakti, mahabhava. An ordinary man takes a whole lifetime to express even a single one
of these. But in this body [meaning himself] there has been a complete manifestation of all
nineteen."
The love of Radha is the precursor of the resplendent vision of Sri Krishna, and Sri
Ramakrishna soon experienced that vision. The enchanting form of Krishna appeared to
him and merged in his person. He became Krishna; he totally forgot his own individuality
and the world; he saw Krishna in himself and in the universe. Thus he attained to the
fulfilment of the worship of the Personal God. He drank from the fountain of Immortal
Bliss. The agony of his heart vanished forever. He realized Amrita, Immortality, beyond the
shadow of death.
One day, listening to a recitation of the Bhagavata on the verandah of the Radhakanta
temple he fell into a divine mood and saw the enchanting form of Krishna. He perceived
the luminous rays issuing from Krishna's Lotus Feet in the form of a stout rope, which
touched first the Bhagavata and then his own chest, connecting all three - God, the
scripture, and the devotee. "After this vision," he used to say, "I came to realize that
Bhagavan, Bhakta, and Bhagavata - God, Devotee, and Scripture - are in reality one and the
same
."

Sri Ramakrishna could say from direct experience thus:
"The Saguna Brahman is meant for the bhaktas. In other words, a bhakta believes that God
has attributes and reveals Himself to men as a Person, assuming forms. It is He who listens
to our prayers. The prayers that you utter are directed to Him alone. You are bhaktas, not
jnanis or Vedantists. It doesn't matter whether you accept God with form or not. It is
enough to feel that God is a Person who listens to our prayers, who creates, preserves, and
destroys the universe, and who is endowed with infinite power.
"It is easier to attain God by following the path of devotion.
"
Namaskar.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #84 on: April 27, 2012, 07:11:55 AM »
An Excerpt From The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna:
MASTER (to Mahimacharan): "How much of the scriptures can you read? What will you
gain by mere reasoning? Try to realize God before anything else. Have faith in the guru's
words, and work. If you have no guru, then pray to God with a longing heart. He will let
you know what He is like.
"What will you learn of God from books? As long as you are at a distance from the marketplace
you hear only an indistinct roar. But it is quite different when you are actually there.
Then you hear and see everything distinctly. You hear people saying: 'Here are your
potatoes. Take them and give me the money.' "From a distance you hear only the rumbling
noise of the ocean. Go near it and you will see many boats sailing about, birds flying, and
waves rolling.
"One cannot get true feeling about God from the study of books. This feeling is something
very different from book-learning. Books, scriptures, and science appear as mere dirt and
straw after the realization of God
.
"The one thing needful is to be introduced to the master of the house. Why are you so
anxious to know beforehand how many houses and gardens, and how many government
securities, the master possesses? The servants of the house would not allow you even to
approach these, and they would certainly not tell you about their master's investments.
Therefore, somehow or other become acquainted with the master, even if you have to jump
over the fence or take a few pushes from the servants. Then the master himself will tell you
all about his houses and gardens and his government securities. And what is more, the
servants and the door-keeper will salute you when you are known to the master.' (All
laugh.)
Yearning for God
DEVOTEE: "Now the question is how to become acquainted with the master." (Laughter.)
MASTER: "That is why I say that work is necessary. It will not do to say that God exists
and then idle away your time. You must reach God somehow or other. Call on Him in
solitude and pray to Him, 'O Lord! reveal Thyself to me.' Weep for Him with a longing
heart. You roam about in search of 'woman and gold' like a madman; now be a little mad
for God. Let people say, 'This man has lost his head for God.' Why not renounce everything
for a few days and call on God in solitude?
Work hard for His realization
"What will you achieve by simply saying that God exists and doing nothing about it? There
are big fish in the Haldarpukur; but can you catch them by merely sitting idly on the bank?
Prepare some spiced bait and throw it into the lake. Then the fish will come from the deep
water and you will see ripples. That will make you happy. Perhaps a fish will jump with a
splash and you will get a glimpse of it. Then you will be so glad!
"Milk must be turned to curd and the curd must be churned. Only then will you get butter.
(To Mahima) What a nuisance! Someone must show God to a man, while he himself sits
idly by all the while! Someone must extract the butter and hold it in front of his mouth! (All
laugh.) What a bother! Someone else must catch the fish and give it to him!
"A man wanted to see the king. The king lived in the inner court of the palace, beyond
seven gates. No sooner did the man pass the first gate than he exclaimed, 'Oh, where is the
king?' But there were seven gates, and he must pass them one after another before he could
see the king."
MAHIMACHARAN: "By what kind of work can one realize God?"
MASTER: "It is not that God can be realized by this work and not by that. The vision of
God depends on His grace. Still a man must work a little with longing for God in his heart.
If he has longing he will receive the grace of God
."


Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #85 on: April 27, 2012, 05:06:22 PM »
Dear i,

nothing is more blissful than the yearning for Eeshwara-Guru-Atma. The pain in the yearning is more divine than perhaps the liberation itself. The bhava of ones longing for Eeshwara-Guru-Atma is supreme blissful pain.

In the entire Srimad Bhagavata, just in some very small section, can we find some thing about Radha and Krishna. But how much waves of devotion we find in the world about Radha's Bhakti, celebrated in the world? Unlike others, Radha was able to see Krishna just once, or just very little perhaps, and we find no mention about Radha at all again! Neither Krishna could meet Radha or Radha could meet Krishna, but they were in communion. They felt for each other, the Bhavam, the yearning for each other, the எக்கம் or யெக்கம் (kindly correct my spelling) for each other is what is Madhura Bhakti.

Salutations to Bhagavan
« Last Edit: April 27, 2012, 05:10:18 PM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #86 on: April 28, 2012, 08:01:22 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...

Attitude toward Different Religions
Sri Ramakrishna accepted the divinity of Buddha and used to point out the similarity of his
teachings to those of the Upanishads. He also showed great respect for the Tirthankaras,
who founded Jainism, and for the ten Gurus of Sikhism. But he did not speak of them as
Divine Incarnations. He was heard to say that the Gurus of Sikhism were the reincarnations
of King Janaka of ancient India. He kept in his room at Dakshineswar a small statue of
Tirthankara Mahavira and a picture of Christ, before which incense was burnt morning and
evening.
Without being formally initiated into their doctrines, Sri Ramakrishna thus realized the
ideals of religions other than Hinduism. He did not need to follow any doctrine. All barriers
were removed by his overwhelming love of God. So he became a Master who could speak
with authority regarding the ideas and ideals of the various religions of the world. "I have
practised", said he, "all religions - Hinduism, Islam, Christianity - and I have also followed
the paths of the different Hindu sects. I have found that it is the same God toward whom all
are directing their steps, though along different paths. You must try all beliefs and traverse
all the different ways once. Wherever I look, I see men quarrelling in the name of religion -
Hindus, Mohammedans, Brahmos, Vaishnavas, and the rest. But they never reflect that He
who is called Krishna is also called Siva, and bears the name of the Primal Energy, Jesus,
and Allah as well - the same Rama with a thousand names. A lake has several ghats. At one
the Hindus take water in pitchers and call it 'jal'; at another the Mussalmans take water in
leather bags and call it 'pani'. At a third the Christians call it 'water'. Can we imagine that it
is not 'jal', but only 'pani' or 'water'? How ridiculous! The substance is One under different
names, and everyone is seeking the same substance; only climate, temperament, and name
create differences. Let each man follow his own path. If he sincerely and ardently wishes to
know God, peace be unto him! He will surely realize Him."
In 1867 Sri Ramakrishna returned to Kamarpukur to recuperate from the effect of his
austerities. The peaceful countryside, the simple and artless companions of his boyhood,
and the pure air did him much good. The villagers were happy to get back their playful,
frank, witty, kind-hearted, and truthful Gadadhar, though they did not fail to notice the
great change that had come over him during his years in Calcutta. His wife, Sarada Devi,
now fourteen years old, soon arrived at Kamarpukur. Her spiritual development was much
beyond her age and she was able to understand immediately her husband's state of mind.
She became eager to learn from him about God and to live with him as his attendant. The
Master accepted her cheerfully both as his disciple and as his spiritual companion.
Referring to the experiences of these few days, she once said: "I used to feel always as if a
pitcher full of bliss were placed in my heart. The joy was indescribable."

to be continued...

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #87 on: April 29, 2012, 09:25:28 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...

Pilgrimage
On January 27, 1868, Mathur Babu with a party of some one hundred and twenty-five
persons set out on a pilgrimage to the sacred places of northern India. At Vaidyanath in
Behar, when the Master saw the inhabitants of a village reduced by poverty and starvation
to mere skeletons, he requested his rich patron to feed the people and give each a piece of
cloth. Mathur demurred at the added expense. The Master declared bitterly that he would
not go on to Benares, but would live with the poor and share their miseries. He actually left
Mathur and sat down with the villagers.
Whereupon Mathur had to yield. On another occasion, two years later, Sri Ramakrishna
showed a similar sentiment for the poor and needy. He accompanied Mathur on a tour to
one of the latter's estates at the time of the collection of rents. For two years the harvests
had failed and the tenants were in a state of extreme poverty. The Master asked Mathur to
remit their rents, distribute help to them, and in addition give the hungry people a
sumptuous feast. When Mathur grumbled, the Master said: "You are only the steward of the
Divine Mother. They are the Mother's tenants. You must spend the Mother's money. When
they are suffering, how can you refuse to help them? You must help them." Again Mathur
had to give in. Sri Ramakrishna's sympathy for the poor sprang from his perception of God
in all created beings. His sentiment was not that of the humanist or philanthropist. To him
the service of man was the same as the worship of God.
The party entered holy Benares by boat along the Ganges. When Sri Ramakrishna's eyes
fell on this city of Siva, where had accumulated for ages the devotion and piety of countless
worshippers, he saw it to be made of gold, as the scriptures declare. He was visibly moved.
During his stay in the city he treated every particle of its earth with utmost respect. At the
Manikarnika Ghat, the great cremation ground of the city, he actually saw Siva, with ashcovered
body and tawny matted hair, serenely approaching each funeral pyre and breathing
into the ears of the corpses the mantra of liberation; and then the Divine Mother removing
from the dead their bonds. Thus he realized the significance of the scriptural statement that
anyone dying in Benares attains salvation through the grace of Siva. He paid a visit to
Trailanga Swami, the celebrated monk, whom he later declared to be a real paramahamsa, a
veritable image of Siva.
Sri Ramakrishna visited Allahabad, at the confluence of the Ganges and the Jamuna, and
then proceeded to Vrindavan and Mathura, hallowed by the legends, songs, and dramas
about Krishna and the gopis. Here he had numerous visions and his heart overflowed with
divine emotion. He wept and said: "O Krishna! Everything here is as it was in the olden
days. You alone are absent." He visited the great woman saint Gangamayi, regarded by
Vaishnava devotees as the reincarnation of an intimate attendant of Radha. She was sixty
years old and had frequent trances. She spoke of Sri Ramakrishna as an incarnation of
Radha. With great difficulty he was persuaded to leave her.
On the return journey Mathur wanted to visit Gaya, but Sri Ramakrishna declined to go. He
recalled his father's vision at Gaya before his own birth and felt that in the temple of Vishnu
he would become permanently absorbed in God. Mathur, honouring the Master's wish,
returned with his party to Calcutta.
From Vrindavan the Master had brought a handful of dust. Part of this he scattered in the
Panchavati; the rest he buried in the little hut where he had practised meditation. "Now this
place", he said, "is as sacred as Vrindavan."
In 1870 the Master went on a pilgrimage to Nadia, the birth-place of Sri Chaitanya. As the
boat by which he travelled approached the sand-bank close to Nadia, Sri Ramakrishna had
a vision of the "two brothers", Sri Chaitanya and his companion Nityananda, "bright as
molten gold" and with haloes, rushing to greet him with uplifted hands. "There they come!
There they come!" he cried. They entered his body and he went into a deep trance.

To be continued...

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #88 on: May 05, 2012, 09:02:20 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...
Relation with His Wife
In 1872, Sarada Devi paid her first visit to her husband at Dakshineswar. Four years earlier
she had seen him at Kamarpukur and had tasted the bliss of his divine company. Since then
she had become even more gentle, tender, introspective, serious, and unselfish. She had
heard many rumours about her husband's insanity. People had shown her pity in her
misfortune. The more she thought, the more she felt that her duty was to be with him,
giving him, in whatever measure she could, a wife's devoted service. She was now eighteen
years old. Accompanied by her father, she arrived at Dakshineswar, having come on foot
the distance of eighty miles. She had had an attack of fever on the way. When she arrived at
the temple garden the Master said sorrowfully: "Ah! You have come too late. My Mathur is
no longer here to look after you." Mathur had passed away the previous year.
The Master took up the duty of instructing his young wife, and this included everything
from housekeeping to the Knowledge of Brahman. He taught her how to trim a lamp, how
to behave toward people according to their differing temperaments, and how to conduct
herself before visitors. He instructed her in the mysteries of spiritual life - prayer,
meditation, japa, deep contemplation, and samadhi. The first lesson that Sarada Devi
received was: "God is everybody's Beloved, just as the moon is dear to every child.
Everyone has the same right to pray to Him. Out of His grace He reveals Himself to all who
call upon Him. You too will see Him if you but pray to Him."
Totapuri, coming to know of the Master's marriage, had once remarked: "What does it
matter? He alone is firmly established in the Knowledge of Brahman who can adhere to his
spirit of discrimination and renunciation even while living with his wife. He alone has
attained the supreme illumination who can look on man and woman alike as Brahman. A
man with the idea of sex may be a good aspirant, but he is still far from the goal." Sri
Ramakrishna and his wife lived together at Dakshineswar, but their minds always soared
above the worldly plane. A few months after Sarada Devi's arrival Sri Ramakrishna
arranged, on an auspicious day, a special worship of Kali, the Divine Mother. Instead of an
image of the Deity, he placed on the seat the living image, Sarada Devi herself. The
worshipper and the worshipped went into deep samadhi and in the transcendental plane
their souls were united. After several hours Sri Ramakrishna came down again to the
relative plane, sang a hymn to the Great Goddess, and surrendered, at the feet of the living
image, himself, his rosary, and the fruit of his life-long sadhana. This is known in Tantra as
the Shorasi Puja, the "Adoration of Woman". Sri Ramakrishna realized the significance of
the great statement of the Upanishad: "O Lord, Thou art the woman, Thou art the man;
Thou art the boy, Thou art the girl; Thou art the old, tottering on their crutches. Thou
pervadest the universe in its multiple forms.
"
By his marriage Sri Ramakrishna admitted the great value of marriage in man's spiritual
evolution, and by adhering to his monastic vows he demonstrated the imperative necessity
of self-control, purity, and continence, in the realization of God. By his unique spiritual
relationship with his wife he proved that husband and wife can live together as spiritual
companions. Thus his life is a synthesis of the ways of life of the householder and the
monk.

This wonderful life of Sri Ramakrishna and Our Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi is unique in the whole of Hagiography.To contemplate the life of this Divine couple is a powerful means to conquer Lust.Later on when devotees asked our Holy Mother as to how she ,who is the embodiment of womanhood and bashfulness,accepted the worship of Sri Ramakrishna!The Holy Mother simply replied 'at that time ,I was not myself'!
Just to contemplate this scene when both The Master and Our Holy Mother immersed in samadhi -This in itself is good to purify and elevate our mind.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4009
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #89 on: May 07, 2012, 07:09:55 AM »
The Story of Sri Ramakrishna continued...
The "Ego" of the Master
In the nirvikalpa samadhi Sri Ramakrishna had realized that Brahman alone is real and the
world illusory. By keeping his mind six months on the plane of the non-dual Brahman, he
had attained to the state of the vijnani, the Knower of Truth in a special and very rich sense,
who sees Brahman not only in himself and in the transcendental Absolute, but in everything
of the world. In this state of vijnana, sometimes, bereft of body-consciousness, he would
regard himself as one with Brahman; sometimes, conscious of the dual world, he would
regard himself as God's devotee, servant, or child. In order to enable the Master to work for
the welfare of humanity, the Divine Mother had kept in him a trace of ego, which he
described - according to his mood - as the "ego of Knowledge", the "ego of Devotion", the
"ego of a child", or the "ego of a servant". In any case this ego of the Master, consumed by
the fire of the Knowledge of Brahman, was an appearance only, like a burnt string. He
often referred to this ego as the "ripe ego" in contrast with the ego of the bound soul, which
he described as the "unripe" or "green" ego. The ego of the bound soul identifies itself with
the body, relatives, possessions, and the world; but the "ripe ego", illumined by Divine
Knowledge, knows the body, relatives, possessions, and the world to be unreal and
establishes a relationship of love with God alone. Through this "ripe ego" Sri Ramakrishna
dealt with the world and his wife. One day, while stroking his feet, Sarada Devi asked the
Master, "What do you think of me?" Quick came the answer: "The Mother who is
worshipped in the temple is the mother who has given birth to my body and is now living in
the nahabat, and it is She again who is stroking my feet at this moment. Indeed, I always
look on you as the personification of the Blissful Mother Kali."
Sarada Devi, in the company of her husband, had rare spiritual experiences. She said: "I
have no words to describe my wonderful exaltation of spirit as I watched him in his
different moods. Under the influence of divine emotion he would sometimes talk on
abstruse subjects, sometimes laugh, sometimes weep, and sometimes become perfectly
motionless in samadhi. This would continue throughout the night. There was such an
extraordinary divine presence in him that now and then I would shake with fear and wonder
how the night would pass. Months went by in this way. Then one day he discovered that I
had to keep awake the whole night lest, during my sleep, he should go into samadhi - for it
might happen at any moment -, and so he asked me to sleep in the nahabat."

continued...