Author Topic: Rough Notebook-Open Forum  (Read 315670 times)

sanjaya_ganesh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 859
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #270 on: October 07, 2012, 08:50:48 PM »
Udai garu - So glad to see you back again :). Your level of questioning made me doubt you are not a newbie :)
Salutations to Bhagawan

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #271 on: October 08, 2012, 07:53:06 AM »
Friends,
An excerpt from Sister DevamAtA's reminiscences of SwAmi VivekAnanda:
"Autumn brought our return to New York. Winter set in with its busy routine, but the memory of the conversation with the Swedenborgian minister still remained vivid. One day, as I was walking up Madison Avenue, I saw in the window of the Hall of the Universal Brotherhood a modest sign saying: "Next Sunday at 3 p.m. Swami Vivekananda will speak here on 'What is Vedanta?' and the following Sunday on 'What is yoga?". I reached the hall twenty minutes before the hour. It was already over half full. It was not large, however — a long, narrow room with a single aisle and benches reaching from it to the wall; a low platform holding reading-desk and chair at the far end; and a flight of stairs at the back. The hall was on the second storey and these stairs gave the only way of access to it — audience and speaker both had to make use of them. By the time three o'clock had arrived, hall, stairs, window-sills, and railings, all were crowded to their utmost capacity. Many even were standing below, hoping to catch a faint echo of the words spoken in the hall above.

A sudden hush, a quiet step on the stairs, and Swami Vivekananda passed in stately erectness up the aisle to the platform. He began to speak; and memory, time, place, people, all melted away. Nothing was left but a voice ringing through the void. It was as if a gate had swung open and I had passed out on a road leading to limitless attainment. The end of it was not visible; but the promise of what it would be shone through the thought and flashed through the personality of the one who gave it. He stood there — prophet of infinitude.

The silence of an empty hall recalled me to myself. Everyone was gone except the Swami and two others standing near the platform. I learnt later that they were Mr. and Mrs. Goodyear, ardent disciples of the Swami. Mr. Goodyear made the announcements at the meetings. After that I attended all the classes and lectures during the Swami's two seasons in New York, but I never came in close personal touch with him. There seemed to be an intangible barrier. Was it created by shyness or a sense of strangeness, or by my elder sister's prejudice? She had no sympathy with my Oriental studies and often said she wished I "could get salvation nearer home".

There was still a final Sunday lecture. It look place in the Madison Square Concert Hall — a fairly large hall on the second floor behind the Madison Square Garden, a vast arena used for automobile exhibitions, bicycle races, horse shows, for anything that required space. The building seemed huge at that time, but later New York outgrew it. and it was torn down. The Concert Hall was much used by Glee Clubs, siring quartets, and lectures. I do not know how many it held, but it was full to the uttermost at that closing lecture — every seat, every foot of standing room was occupied.

I believe that was the day on which Swami Vivekananda delivered the lecture on My Master. As he entered the hall from a door at the side of the platform, one sensed a different mood in him. He seemed less confident, as if he approached his task reluctantly. Years after in Madras I understood. He hesitated at all times to speak of his guru. During his early wanderings through South India he refused to reveal his name even, believing he represented him so poorly. Only in Madras, when he came unaware upon his Master's picture, did the words burst from his lips: "That is my guru, Shri Ramakrishna," and tears streamed down his face. So now was he reluctant. He began his lecture with a long preamble; but once in his subject, it swept him. The force of it drove him from one end of the platform to the other. It overflowed in a swift-running stream of eloquence and feeling. The large audience listened in awed stillness and at the close many left the hall without speaking. As for myself, I was transfixed. The transcendent picture drawn overwhelmed me. The call had come, and I answered."


Those interested may read the complete article here:

http://www.ramakrishnavivekananda.info/reminiscences/121_sd.htm

'My Master' is one single talk of SwAmiji that I value most.It sounds perennialy fresh and captivating.
Namaskar.


Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6362
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #272 on: October 08, 2012, 10:57:50 PM »
Dear Sri Ravi, Thank You Very much for this post about Swami Vivekananda! I enjoyed it,and i must say that i love to read everything on Him. I love His letters mostly... Trough them i,somehow,can see how Beautiful and Great Soul He was. Wanted to read more from this,but i cannot open this link. It doasnt work i think.

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #273 on: October 09, 2012, 08:01:56 AM »

Quote:
“A sudden hush, a quiet step on the stairs, and Swami Vivekananda passed in stately erectness up the aisle to the platform. He began to speak; and memory, time, place, people, all melted away. Nothing was left but a voice ringing through the void. It was as if a gate had swung open and I had passed out on a road leading to limitless attainment. The end of it was not visible; but the promise of what it would be shone through the thought and flashed through the personality of the one who gave it. He stood there — prophet of infinitude.”


“Those interested may read the complete article here:

http://www.ramakrishnavivekananda.info/reminiscences/121_sd.htm

'My Master' is one single talk of SwAmiji that I value most.It sounds perennialy fresh and captivating.
Namaskar.”

Dear Sri Ravi,
Ji. Yes. I would certainly like to read the complete “My Master”, which is indeed a great talk delivered by Swami Sri Vivekanada.  But the address given by you is not valid. I failed to download the same due to invalid address. Kindly give the correct address.
Thanks very much, sir.
Pranam,
  Anil

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #274 on: October 09, 2012, 08:19:56 AM »
Jewell/Anil,
Here is the link to my master in a pdf format.I am not sure whether it can be used for copy & paste for sharing,but may be used for reading:

http://www.vivekananda.net/PDFBooks/My_Master.pdf

Here is a link to the html of My Master,which is useful for copy & Paste sharing:
http://www.hinduism.fsnet.co.uk/namoma/life_thakur/life_thakur_my_master.htm

The inspiration and sheer intensity  in this talk always keeps this one Fresh and when I read it,it is as if Swamiji is speaking to us Directly,right here and now.

Namaskar.

Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6362
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #275 on: October 09, 2012, 11:34:59 PM »
Thank You Very much,dear Sri Ravi!!

Yes,Swami Vivekananda's talks are truly Very inspirational!! I always enjoy reading and hearing everything from Him.


eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #276 on: October 11, 2012, 12:18:15 PM »
Quote:
MASTER: "But I give the illustration of the sound of a gong: 'tom', t-o-m. It is the merging
of the Lila in the Nitya: the gross, the subtle, and the causal merge in the Great Cause;
waking, dream, and deep sleep merge in Turiya. The striking of the gong is like the falling
of a heavy weight into a big ocean. Waves begin to rise: the Relative rises from the
Absolute; the causal, subtle, and gross bodies appear out of the Great Cause; from Turiya
emerge the states of deep sleep, dream, and waking. These waves arising from the Great
Ocean merge again in the Great Ocean. From the Absolute to the Relative, and from the
Relative to the Absolute. Therefore I give the illustration of the gong's sound, 'tom'. I have
clearly perceived all these things. It has been revealed to me that there exists an Ocean of
Consciousness without limit. From It come all things of the relative plane, and in It they
merge again. Millions of Brahmandas rise in that Chidakasa and merge in It again. All this
has been revealed to me; I don't know, much about what your books say."


Dear Sri Ravi,

My Goodness! What a Teaching !
MERGING OF THE LILA IN THE NITYA.
MERGING OF THE GROSS, THE SUBTLE AND THE CAUSAL IN THE GREAT CAUSE.
MERGING OF THE WAKING, DREAM AND DEEP SLEEP IN TURIYA.
THESE WAVES ARISING FROM THE GREAT OCEAN MERGE AGAIN IN THE GREAT OCEAN.
FROM THE ABSOLUTE TO THE RELATIVE, AND THE RELATIVE TO THE ABSOLUTE.
THEREFORE, I GIVE THE ILLUSTRATION OF THE GONG’S SOUND ‘TOM’ ! 
I am overwhelmed to have a feel of such Sublime Teaching taught so simply, spontaneously and as a matter of fact, by such a great Master.

I am grateful. Thanks very much, sir.

Pranam,
  Anil 


 

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #277 on: October 11, 2012, 08:40:39 PM »
Nagaraj/Udai/Friends,

udai had asked:

Quote
"Very Apt quote of Sri Ramakrishna.
But what does it mean that "I" is a servant of God, is a big big question".

Here is an excerpt from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna where the Master explains clearly what he means:
"Two monks had arrived at the temple garden in the morning. They were devoted to the
study of the Bhagavad Gita, the Vedanta, and other scriptures. They entered the Master's
room, saluted him, and sat on the mat on the floor. Sri Ramakrishna was seated on the
small couch. The Master spoke to the sadhus in Hindusthani.

MASTER: "Have you had your meal?"

SADHU: "Yes, sir."

MASTER: "What did you eat?"

SADHU: "Dal and bread. Will you take some?"

MASTER: "No, I take only a few morsels of rice. Well, your japa and meditation must be
without any desire for results. Isn't that so
?"

SADHU: "Yes, Sir."

MASTER: "That is good. One must surrender the result to God. What do you say? That is
the view of the Gita."


One sadhu said to the other, quoting from the Gita: "O Arjuna, whatever action you
perform, whatever you eat, whatever you offer in sacrifice, whatever you give in charity,
and whatever austerities you practise, offer everything to Me."


MASTER: "If you give God something, you receive it back a thousand times over. That is
why after doing meritorious deeds one offers a handful of water to God. It is the symbol of
offering the fruit to God. When Yudhisthira was about to offer all his sins to Krishna,
Bhima warned him: 'Never do such a thing. Whatever you offer to Krishna you will receive
back a thousandfold.'

(To one of the sadhus) "Well, sir, one should be de- sireless; one should renounce all
desires. Isn't that so?"


SADHU: "Yes, sir."

MASTER: "But I have the desire for bhakti. That is not bad. Rather, it is good. Sweets are
bad, for they produce acidity. But sugar candy is an exception. Isn't that so?"


SADHU: "Yes, sir."

MASTER: "Well, sir, what do you think of the Vedanta?"

SADHU: "It includes all the six systems of philosophy."

MASTER: "But the essence of Vedanta is: 'Brahman alone is real, and the world illusory; I
have no separate existence; I am that Brahman alone.' Isn't that so?"


SADHU: "That is true, sir."

MASTER: "But for those who lead a householder's life, and those who identify themselves
with the body, this attitude of 'I am He' is not good. It is not good for householders to read
Vedanta or the Yogavasishtha. It is very harmful for them to read these books.
Householders should look on God as their Master and on themselves as His servants. They
should think, 'O God, You are the Master and the Lord, and I am Your servant.' People who
identify themselves with the body should not have the attitude of 'I am He'."


The devotees in the room remained silent. Sri Ramakrishna was smiling a little, a picture of
self-contentment. He appeared happy in his own Self
.

One of the sadhus whispered in the other's ear: "Look! This is the state of the
paramahamsa."


MASTER (to M.): "I feel like laughing."

Sri Ramakrishna smiled like a child. The monks left the room. The devotees were moving
about in the room and on the porch."

Seeking God is Nivritti marga,seeking the world is pravritti.Actions done as an offering to God is Nivritti,actions done to further one's desire is pravritti.
Nivritti is moving to the core of one's being.Pravritti is moving away from the core.

What to say of someone like Sri Ramakrishna who says:""I do see God directly. What shall I reason about? I clearly see that He Himself has
become everything; that He Himself has become the universe and all living beings."

Pravritti and Nivritti loses all meaning for such a one.

Namaskar.

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #278 on: October 11, 2012, 08:49:41 PM »
Seeking God is Nivritti marga,seeking the world is pravritti.Actions done as an offering to God is Nivritti,actions done to further one's desire is pravritti.

Nivritti is moving to the core of one's being.Pravritti is moving away from the core.

What to say of someone like Sri Ramakrishna who says:""I do see God directly. What shall I reason about? I clearly see that He Himself has become everything; that He Himself has become the universe and all living beings."

Pravritti and Nivritti loses all meaning for such a one.

Stamping clarity! Thank you for this post.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #279 on: October 11, 2012, 09:10:40 PM »
Just felt like adding a couple of points. Mundakopanishad says thus:

द्वे विद्ये वेदितव्ये इति ह स्म यद्ब्रह्मविदो वदन्ति परा चैवापरा च

dve vidyE veditavyE eti hasma yad brahmavido vadanti, para chaivApara ca

which means, there are two kinds of knowledge worthy to be known, namely, one is para vidyA and the other is aparA vidyA

para vidyA is the knowledge of the Divine and aparA vidyA is the knowledge of the world. One may engage in countless works, even be very honest and God fearing, but if his actions are not intended towards striving to gain the knowledge of the Divine, then it does not lead one towards Divinity, but only those actions performed with the pure intention of striving only for God and divinity alone is of praiseworthy.

Therefore having the idea that one is working only for God's sake is very simple, and easy way to remain steadfast in para vidyA that is striving towards the knowledge of the divine.

there is a thin line between two, mere excellence in worldly life without the knowledge of para vidyA would only bring temporary happiness but with constant thought of God, brings everlasting contentment, where one would realise that the kingdom of heaven is within you.

This is the promise of the Gods and Gurus, as i see.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5130
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #280 on: October 11, 2012, 09:21:48 PM »
my post is actually redundant, the essence is very neatly, already conveyed in Sri Ravi's post itself!

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #281 on: October 12, 2012, 09:22:57 AM »
Udai,

"I do not know the validity of the statement that a householder should not read Yoga Vasishta. I have been immensely benefited by it. It cannot be generalized like that. Perhaps Sri Ramakrishna might have given that suggestion to a specific person who lacked this vision -- I am not sure. In any case, Sri Ramakrishna is not someone who would advise me to not read Yoga Vasishta. Infact Yoga Vasishta is the best book on vedanta that everyone should read , in my opinion. And Ramana never made any such distinctions about Yoga Vasishta".

So much for the much vaunted Intellect! :)

Yes,Bhagavan did not exclude Yoga vasishta as he did not Exclude Japa,DhyAna as well. :)

When one is Truly silent one will not perceive any contradiction here.The unprepared Intellect clutches at stray phrases here and there ,pulls it out of context and comes to silly conclusions.It is all the time serving one's own desire!

Sri Ramakrishna is talking to two Sadhus and he is talking about 'Householders'!This needs to be simply seen.

He is also talking about  the harm of 'I am He' thinking to them who have studied the Gita,Vedanta,etc!

He is only saying that if one simply 'Reads' the Yoga Vasishta and not 'Lives' as per That,it is a form of falsehood and is extremely Harmful,as there is a clear schism betweeen what one 'Imagines'(what is called thinking 'just Be')and what one actually Is!

One needs to see this quite simply ,and more so someone who thinks Sri Ramakrishna is His Guru and God. :)

In other words he would like you to be in Nivritti as the Essence of Yoga vAsishtA and not be in Pravritti about nuturing desire to Translate YOga vAsishta.
This 'Nivritti' is simply maintained by the 'I am The servant' attitude,even should one read the Yoga vAsishta' :)

Namaskar.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #282 on: October 13, 2012, 06:31:29 AM »
Udai/Friends,
In today's post in The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,This is posted:
The "ego of a devotee"
VIJAY (to the Master): "Sir, you ask us to renounce the 'wicked I'. Is there any harm in the
'servant I'?"


MASTER: "The 'servant I'-that is, the feeling, 'I am the servant of God, I am the devotee of
God'-does not injure one. On the contrary, it helps one to realize God."


VIJAY: "Well, sir, what becomes of the lust, anger, and other passions of one who keeps
the 'servant I'?"

MASTER: "If a man truly feels like that, then he has only the semblance of lust, anger, and
the like. If, after attaining God, he looks on himself as the servant or the devotee of God,
then he cannot injure anyone. By touching the philosopher's stone a sword is turned into
gold. It keeps the appearance of a sword but cannot injure.

"When the dry branch of a coconut palm drops to the ground, it leaves only a mark on the
trunk indicating that once there was a branch at that place. In like manner, he who has
attained God keeps only an appearance of ego; there remains in him only a semblance of
anger and lust. He becomes like a child. A child has no attachment to the three gunassattva,
rajas, and tamas. He becomes as quickly detached from a thing as he becomes
attached to it. You can cajole him out of a cloth worth five rupees with a doll worth an
anna, though at first he may say with great determination: 'No, I won't give it to you. My
daddy bought it for me.' Again, all persons are the same to a child. He has no feeling of
high and low in regard to persons. So he doesn't discriminate about caste. If his mother tells
him that a particular man should be regarded as an elder brother, the child will eat from the
same plate with him, though the man may belong to the low caste of a blacksmith. The
child doesn't know hate, or what is holy or unholy.

"Even after attaining samadhi, some retain the 'servant ego' or the 'devotee ego'. The bhakta
keeps this 'I-consciousness'. He says, 'O God, Thou art the Master and I am Thy servant;
Thou art the Lord and I am Thy devotee.' He feels that way even after the realization of
God. His 'I' is not completely effaced. Again, by constantly practising this kind of 'Iconsciousness',
one ultimately attains God. This is called bhaktiyoga.


"One can attain the Knowledge of Brahman, too, by following the path of bhakti. God is
all-powerful. He may give His devotee Brahmajnana also, if He so wills. But the devotee
generally doesn't seek the Knowledge of the Absolute. He would rather have the
consciousness that God is the Master and he the servant, or that God is the Divine Mother
and he the child."



Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #283 on: October 13, 2012, 06:38:33 AM »
Friends,
A couple of Excerpts from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna:

"What is knowledge? And what is the nature of this ego? 'God alone is the Doer, and none
else' - that is knowledge. I am not the doer; I am a mere instrument in His hand. Therefore I
say: 'O Mother, Thou art the Operator and I am the machine. Thou art the Indweller and I
am the house. Thou art the Driver and I am the carriage. I move as Thou movest me. I do as
Thou makest me do. I speak as Thou makest me speak. Not I, not I, but Thou, but Thou.' "


"Just try to find out who this 'I' is. While you are searching for 'I', 'He' comes
out. 'I am the machine and He is the Operator.'
You have heard of a mechanical toy that
goes into a store with a letter in its hand. You are like that toy. God alone is the Doer. Do
your duties in the world as if you were the doer, but knowing all the time that God alone is
the Doer and you are the instrument
.
As long as the upadhi exists there is ignorance. 'I am a scholar', 'I am a jnani', 'I am
wealthy', 'I am honourable', 'I am the master, father, and teacher' -all these ideas are
begotten of ignorance. 'I am the machine and You are the Operator' - that is Knowledge. In
the state of Knowledge all upadhis are destroyed
. When the log is burnt up entirely, there is
no more sound; no heat either. Everything cools down. Peace! Peace! Peace!"


Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4050
    • View Profile
Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #284 on: October 13, 2012, 01:47:11 PM »
Friends,
An excerpt from the Translation of Atma bOdha by Sri Bhagavan:
After a devotee sent to Sri Bhagavan a Tamil translation of Shankaracharya's Atma Bodha, Bhagavan composed a new
translation in Tamil. He did this translation very rapidly, working even at night, using a flashlight!

`Can Shankara, the enlightener of the Self, be different from one's own Self? Who but he, does this day, abiding as
the inmost Self in me, speak this in the Tamil language?
'

Namaskar.