Author Topic: Rough Notebook-Open Forum  (Read 358349 times)

ksksat27

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2070 on: August 19, 2016, 12:01:46 PM »
Quote
Ha,ha...In that case,the entire magazine would have  landed with that 'kadalai wala'(Vendor of ground nuts)

I wouldn't go so far. There are still 1 or 2 articles usually worth reading. But some are fit for the kadalai wala. Or may be it even came from there.:o

Dear Sadhak

I find it appropriate to repeat my answer to the elsewhere 'kadalai' comment which hurts the devotees.

Subramaniam sir considers it a sadhana to write all articles on mountain path and other books related to sri ramanasramam.

if we dont like an article, please ignore.. may be it is sub standard to your highly evolved spiritual state.  does not matter. 

it does not really look good to compare like this and say that the magazine papers will go to kadalai vendor.

are we so complacent and very much absorbed in our 'high' state?  does it befit to continue this kadalai thread like this?

please first learn some humility. ....   every paper in the vicinity of sri ramanasramam is holy..... you may wrap kadalai in such magazines but that does not reflect good with a matured sadhaka and devotee..... 

if we don't like , just move on to next teaching.   

when Maharishee would have heard your comment, his reply would be " That is it,  he is saying this is to wrap kadalai, but I am asking what else is useful when death comes?"

ksksat27

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2071 on: August 19, 2016, 12:12:41 PM »
nice summary by sri Nagaraj.   all the sadhana must be continued till the very end with free will.   going inwards is our choice totally. only the outward life events are governed by prarabdha.

we can decide to get liberated now or after aeons of kalpas.   that is not interfered by destiny.

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2072 on: August 19, 2016, 02:25:07 PM »
DearSri Ravi , Others

Most of the Ashrams in India are Currently well run and they offer much better facilities , food , clean purified water  etc than they used to do few decades back . But as most of the Ashrams are also crowded with people making regular visits to them ( especially in Peak season ) and this crowd is a hetrogenous mixtures of South Indians , North Indians , Foreginers , Rich , Middle Class ,Poor , VIPs etc and so it is very difficult to manage and satisfy all of them at the same time and definitely there will be complaints from the public and that is OK but we have to also understand the excpet for few of the staffs who are paid most of them are doing here voluntary service and not experts in managing these sort of issues ( they will pickup up the art of managing these things  slowly in due course if they stay in the Ashram for long time and well mentored by the Senior swamis and staff ) and so some of them behave rudely with the visitors and that is where visitors start having doubts about the so called 'spirituality" of that place or the "spirituality" of that staff and as Bhagavan Ramana said they will end up discussing that issue throughout their stay there , possible take that issue to the Senior Swami there and give them "Advice" as to how to behave with vistors etc  and it will also continue with them on their return . Might be there can be merit in what the visitors say but the point which Bhagavan Ramana asks is "What happened to the Original Purpose for which you came " and that is the key and that should not be missed .
« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 02:26:46 PM by atmavichar100 »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2073 on: August 19, 2016, 07:13:38 PM »
Atmavichar,

Quote
What happened to the Original Purpose for which you came " and that is the key and that should not be missed .

Ofcourse it should not be missed....A seeker has zero 'expectations'(or should have!) from anyone including his relatives and friends....so,he is going to mind his business anyway....but a majority of people who visit these ashrams do so with a definitive expectation ....that they are visiting some place which is going to be different and superior than the rest of the world,say temples or churches to which they go to routinely in their day to day life and where they do experience differential treatment,indifference,etc....and when they find that these Asramams are no different,then it does give room for all these misgivings and their enthusiasm dies down.

It is from this perspective that I have responded....that how some asramams(particularly the ones which are run by Sadhus) are better managed- guided as they are by the spirit of service....and they supervise the volunteers in a very discreet way!....the volunteers cannot get away with the fact that they can dole out their 'service'(within quotes)the way they want since it is exgratia!....they are briefed and mentored on a continual basis...I know this since my sister is one such volunteer in R K mutt....I have also seen how during the prasad distribution time when the crowds are more,a sadhu goes around ascertaining whether enough food is there and whether it is doled out in adequate measure to the people etc(Like Sri Bhagavan used to do!)

I had an instance recently of one of my colleagues who visited South India for the first time (on a pilgrimage).His itinerary was Sri Aurobindo asramam,Pondicherry as his wife was a devotee....When I accosted him as to whether he had planned to visit Sri Ramanasramam,he just was not aware of Sri Bhagavan....I gave him a 10 minute talk about Sri Bhagavan ,his teachings and the wonderful asramam that is in tiruvannamalai that he should not miss and he became interested and asked me to mail him the pdf books on Bhagavan which I promptly sent him and also gave the email address of the asramam for accommodation booking.....He was quite enthusiastic and promptly booked and got the confirmation from the Asramam as well.....As per his schedule he visited Sri Aurobindo Asramam and gave a call that he is proceeding to Sri Ramanasramam....after a few days since I did not receive a call,I called up wanting to know his response.....He said 'Stay was comfortable....I lost my Shoes on the very first day and when I approached the security at the gate he informed me that it is a common thing there that happens on a daily basis!...and from the rest of the conversation I could make out that the poor guy lost his rhythm with the loss of his shoes....'.....So,a small thing like this can affect the way people look at the rest of the things......and attention to details is definitely called for....Just putting a board saying 'leave your footwear here' ,etc alone is not enough.....The place where people leave the footwear in Sri Ramanasramam definitely needs to be managed better and I have seen on many occasions that the people(Paid ones or Volunteers) who man that place are just 'spectatators' and they leave it to the people to leave the footwear   wherever they choose.Ofcourse it is the responsibility of the individual to take care of his belongings but it can be better facilitated.

Yes,as for sadhakas ,they anyway are there for a definitive purpose....and if they find that during meal times the old hall will be relatively free ,they would take advantage of that rather than rush with the rest of the crowd....and so,they neither have the time or inclination to talk to any of the office bearers or care about how food was served in the dining hall or any other matter....they may repair to any outside stall for simple food or even tea to get by...so,that is a different matter altogether.

Namaskar.

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2074 on: August 19, 2016, 07:46:38 PM »
True Ravi .I concur with what you have said and my suggestion to people visiting any Ashram is first get a proper info regarding the same from a regular visitor to that Ashram who can guide you in advance regarding the same so that you can be better prepared instead of getting frustrated with no one guiding you properly there .More better I would feel that people also be part of that Ashram satsang group for a few months before to make the experience more rich not just physically but elso emotionally as well as spiritually for eg.If someone wants to visit Sri RamanaAshram first try attending the Ramana Satsangs in that particular city for a few weeks and learn what are the basic works of Bhagavn and if possible visit the Ashram when they go on group tours and later visit the ashram alone .This will give a more richer experience .Satsangha is the best to start with and for me the Sivananda Satsanga in Chennai  for nearly 1 year helped me stay in the Sivananda ashram ( in Neyyar Dam , Kerala ) more smoothly when I visited there for my 1 month Yoga Sadhana and that also helped me later when I visited their Ashram in Quebec Canada in few years back . As for Sri Ramana Ashram I had few people to guide me before that and it was a very smooth affair .
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2075 on: August 19, 2016, 08:05:03 PM »
ksksat,

Quote
going inwards is our choice totally. only the outward life events are governed by prarabdha.

There is nothing like outer life events cannot be changed....and that prarabda pertains to outer events....Anything can be changed including Death!
What is 'outer' and 'inner'?....Everything other than the Self is 'outer' only!

As Tiruvalluvar says in verse 269:
கூற்றம் குதித்தலும் கைகூடும் நோற்றலின்
ஆற்றல் தலைப்பட் டவர்க்கு.
(கூற்றம்=Death....We know the stories of markandeya and satyavan,savitri...there are others as well)

There are any number of verses in Tirukkural .For instance this verse:
குறள் 666
எண்ணிய எண்ணியாங் கெய்துவர் எண்ணியார்
திண்ணியர் ஆகப் பெறின்

If we work for microsoft...it does not mean it is prarabda....we may as well change to Google or Amazon or decide to give up those jobs and establish one's own business ....or call it quits if that is what we wish to do....provided we are decisive and strong willed.

முயற்சி திருவினை ஆக்கும் .

Swami Vivekananda has simply clinched this:

"We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. If what we are now has been the result of our own past actions, it certainly follows that whatever we wish to be in the future can be produced by our present actions; so we have to know how to act."

So...prarabda is not a juggernaut that somebody else has imposed on us....it is just the momentum of the past deeds....and it can be offset by our present thought and deed....and it depends on the resolve and decisiveness that we bring into our present action.

In fact Nagaraj has also mentioned this and has gone to great lengths to bring it out.

Namaskar.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 08:29:57 PM by Ravi.N »

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2076 on: August 19, 2016, 10:52:47 PM »
Quote
Swami Vivekananda has simply clinched this:

"We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. If what we are now has been the result of our own past actions, it certainly follows that whatever we wish to be in the future can be produced by our present actions; so we have to know how to act."

Sringeri Acharya Sri Chandrasekhara Bharati has said the same in the wonderful interview with one of his close disciple titeld "Fate and Free Will " from the book "Dialogues with the Guru "
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2077 on: August 20, 2016, 01:47:49 AM »
Atmavichar,
Thanks for that reference...I had come across a scintillating dialogue of H.H Sri Chandrasekhara Bharati swamiji concerning 'advaita and karma'....and found it absolutely insightful and delightful.
I managed to get hold of the pdf copy of the book that you have referred to here:
http://www.vedanta.gr/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/ChandrashekBharati_Dialogues-with-The-Guru_RK-Iyer_ENA5.pdf

This dialogue is again absolutely incisive and sparkling....I shall copy the section 'Fate and Freewill' from this book  for the benefit of all here....I find that there is a lot of confusion that prevails in the minds of many and it will be useful to clear the matter once and for all....as the Acharya brings out all the facets of this topic and clarifies it in pristine fashion.I especially enjoyed how he facilitates,empathizes with the questioner and superbly resolves the subject matter.Interestingly ,I find that when I open that link,there is the icon of Swami Vivekananda on that tab!wonder what this site is....Now back to the subject 'Fate and Free will'

continued....
« Last Edit: August 20, 2016, 02:00:11 AM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2078 on: August 20, 2016, 01:58:28 AM »
Fate and Free will -A dialogue with H.H Sri Chandrashekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal

Fate and Free Will
One evening a disciple approached His Holiness with a view to obtain some valuable instruction, but found words wanting to express his intention and His Holiness came to his relief by starting the conversation himself.

His Holiness: I hope you are pursuing your studies in the Vedanta as usual.
Disciple: I cannot say that I make any regular study, but I do study somewhat off and on.
HH: In the course of your studies, you would have been faced with many doubts.
D: I cannot say that I have studied deep enough even for that.
HH: I do not mean the doubts, which arise when we endeavour to grasp the technicalities of the Vedanta system, but only those broad problems, which present themselves to any one who makes an attempt at serious thinking.
D: Certainly, there are very many such doubts.
HH: Will you formulate one of such doubts and tell me how you have tried to solve it?
D: I shall mention one of such doubts, which is repeatedly coming up to my mind and for which I have found no solution
yet. I shall be very grateful if your Holiness will solve it for me
.
HH: Please mention it.
D: It is no other than the problem of the eternal conflict between fate and free-will. What are their respective provinces and how can the conflict be avoided?
HH: The problem is indeed a very great one and would baffle the intellect of the highest thinkers, if presented in the way you have done it.
D: What is wrong with my presentation? In fact, I only stated my problem and did not even explain how I find it difficult to solve.
HH: Your difficulty arises even in that mere statement of the problem.
D: How?
HH: A conflict is conceivable and possible only if there are two things. There can be no conflict if there is only a single thing.
D: But here there are two things fate and free-will.
HH: Exactly, It is just that assumption that is responsible for the problem arising in your mind.
D: It is not my assumption at all. How can I ignore the fact that they do exist as independent factors, whether l grant their existence or not.
HH: That is where you are wrong again.
D: How?
HH: As a follower of our Sanatana Dharma, you must know that fate is nothing extraneous to yourself, but is only the sum total of the results of your past actions. As God is but the dispenser of the fruits of your actions, fate, representing those fruits, is not His creation but only yours. Free-will is what you exercise when you act now.

continued....

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2079 on: August 20, 2016, 02:14:40 AM »
Fate and Free will -A dialogue with H.H Sri Chandrashekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal continued...

D: Still I do not see how they are not two distinct things.
HH: Have it this way. Fate is past karma, free-will is present karma. Both are really one, that is, karma, though they may differ in the matter of time. There can be no conflict when they are really one.
D: But the difference in time is a vital difference which we cannot possibly overlook.
HH: I do not want you to overlook it, but only to study it more deeply. The present is before you and, by the exercise of free-will, you can attempt to shape it. The past is past and is therefore beyond your vision and is rightly called adrishta, the unseen. You cannot reasonably attempt to find out the relative strength of two things unless both of them are before you. But, by our very definition, free-will, the present
karma alone is before you and fate, the past karma, is invisible.
Even if you see two wrestlers physically squatting before you, you cannot decide about their relative strength. For, one may have weight, the other agility; one muscles and the other tenacity; one the benefit of practice and the other of coolness of judgement and so on. We can on these grounds
go on building arguments on arguments to prove that a particular wrestler will be the winner. But experience shows that each of these qualifications may fail at any time or may prove to be a disqualification. The only reasonable, practical and sure method of determining their relative strength is to ask them to wrestle with each other. While this is so, how do you expect to find by means of arguments a solution to the problem of the relative value of fate and free-will when the former by its very nature is unseen!

D: Is there no way then of solving this problem?
HH: There is this way. The wrestlers must fight with each other and prove which of them is the stronger.
D: In other words, the problem of conflict will get solved only at the end of the conflict. But at that time the problem will have ceased to have any practical significance.
HH: Not only so, it will cease to exist.
D: That is, before the conflict begins, the problem is incapable of solution, and, after the conflict ends, it is no longer necessary to find a solution.
HH: Just so. In either case, it is profitless to embark on the enquiry as to the relative strength of fate and free-will.
D: Does Your Holiness then mean to say that we must resign ourselves to fate?
HH: Certainly not. On the other hand, you must devote yourself to free-will.
D: How can that be?
HH: Fate, as I told you, is the resultant of the past exercise of your free-will. By exercising your free-will in the past, you brought on the resultant fate. By exercising your freewill in the present, I want you to wipe out your past record if it hurts you, or to add to it if you find it enjoyable. In any case, whether for acquiring more happiness or for reducing misery, you have to exercise your free-will in the present.
D: But the exercise of free-will however well directed, very often fails to secure the desired result, as fate steps in and nullifies the action of free-will.
HH: You are again ignoring our definition of fate. It is not an extraneous and a new thing which steps in to nullify your freewill. On the other hand, it is already in you.
D: It may be so, but its existence is felt only when it comes into conflict with free-will How can we possibly wipe out the past record when we do not know nor have the means of knowing what it is?
HH: Except to a very few highly advanced souls, the past certainly remains unknown. But even our ignorance of it is very often an advantage to us. For, if we happen to know all the limitless varieties of results which we have accumulated by our actions in this life and the countless lives that have preceded it, we will be simply staggered at the magnitude and number of such results and give up in despair any attempt to overcome or mitigate them. Even in this life, forgetfulness is a boon which the merciful God has been pleased to bestow on us, so that we may not be buried at any moment with a recollection of all that has transpired in the past. Similarly, the divine spark in us is ever bright with hope and makes it possible for us to confidently exercise our freewill. It is not for us to belittle the significance of these two boons-forgetfulness of the past and hope for the future.

continued.....
« Last Edit: August 20, 2016, 03:03:18 AM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2080 on: August 20, 2016, 02:28:49 AM »
Fate and Free will -A dialogue with H.H Sri Chandrashekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal continued...

D: Our ignorance of the past may be useful in not deterring the exercise of the free-will and hope may stimulate that exercise. All the same, it cannot be denied that fate very often does present a formidable obstacle in the way of such exercise.
HH: It is not quite correct to say that fate places obstacles in the way of free-will. On the other hand, by seeming to oppose our efforts, it tells us what is the extent of free-will that is necessary now to bear fruit. Ordinarily for the purpose of securing a single benefit, a particular activity is prescribed; but we do not know how intensively or how repeatedly that activity has to be pursued or persisted in. If we do not succeed at the very first attempt, we can easily deduce that in the past we have exercised our free-will just in the opposite direction. that the resultant of that past activity has first to be eliminated and that our present effort must be proportionate to that past activity. Thus, the obstacle which fate seems to offer is just the gauge by which we have to guide our present activities.
D: The obstacle is seen only after the exercise of our free-will, how can that help us to guide our activities at the start?
HH: It need not guide us at the start. At the start, you must not be obsessed at all with the idea that there will be any obstacle in your way. Start with boundless hope and with the presumption that there is nothing in the way of your exercising the free-will. If you do not succeed, tell yourself that there has been in the past a counter-influence brought on by yourself by exercising your freewill in the other direction and, therefore, you must now exercise your free-will with re-doubled vigour and persistence to achieve your object. Tell yourself that, inasmuch as the seeming obstacle is of your own making, it is certainly within your competence to overcome it. If you do not succeed even after this renewed effort, there can be absolutely no justification for despair, for fate being but a creature of your free-will can never be stronger than freewill. Your failure only means that your present exercise of freewill is not sufficient to counteract the result of the past exercise of it. In other words, there is no question of a relative proportion between fate and freewill as distinct factors in life. The relative proportion is only as between the intensity of our past action and the intensity of our present action.
D: But even so, the relative intensity can be realised only at the end of our present effort in a particular direction.
HH: It is always so in the case of everything which is adrishta or unseen. Take, for example, a nail driven into a wooden pillar. When you see it for the first time, you actually see, say, an inch of it projecting out of the pillar. The rest of it has gone into the wood and you cannot now see what exact length of the nail is imbedded in the wood. That length,therefore, is unseen or adrishta, so far as you are concerned. Beautifully varnished as the pillar is, you do not know what is the composition of the wood in which the nail is driven. That also is unseen or adrishta. Now suppose you want to pull that nail out, can you tell me how many pulls will be necessary and how powerful each pull has to be?
D: How can I fix the number of pulls now? The number and the intensity of the pulls depend upon the length which has gone into the wood.
HH: Certainly so. And the length which has gone into the wood is not arbitrary, but depended upon the number of strokes which drove it in and the intensity of each of such strokes and the resistance which the wood offered to them.
D: It is so.
HH: The number and intensity of the pulls needed to take out the nail depend therefore upon the number and intensity of the strokes which drove it in.
D: Yes.
HH: But the strokes that drove in the nail are now unseen and unseeable. They relate to the past and are adrishta.
D: Yes.
HH: Do we desist from the attempt to pull out the nail simply because we happen to be ignorant of the length of the nail in the wood or of the number and intensity of the strokes which drove it in? Or, do we persist and persevere in pulling it out by increasing the number and the intensity of our present efforts to pull it out?
D: Certainly, as practical men we adopt the latter course.

continued....

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2081 on: August 20, 2016, 02:42:50 AM »
Fate and Free will -A dialogue with H.H Sri Chandrashekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal continued...

HH: Adopt the same course in every effort of yours. Exert yourself as much as you can. Your will must succeed in the end.
D: But there certainly are many things which are impossible to attain even after the utmost exertion.
HH: There you are mistaken. If there is any thing, it is by its very nature capable of being experienced. There is nothing which is really unattainable. A thing, however, may be unattainable to us at the particular stage at which we are, or with the qualifications that we possess. The attainability or otherwise of a particular thing is thus not an absolute characteristic of that thing but is relative and proportionate to our capacity to attain it.
D: The success or failure of an effort can be known definitely only at the end. How are we then to know beforehand whether with our present capacity we may or may not exert ourselves to attain a particular object, and whether it is the right kind of exertion for the attainment of that object.
HH: Your question is certainly a very pertinent one. The whole aim of our Dharma sastras is to give a detailed answer to your question. They analyse our capacities, or competency, and prescribe the activities which a person endowed with a particular adhikara can undertake. The activities are various and numberless, as the capacities also happen to be various and numberless. Regulation of activities or, in other words, the directing of free-will into channels least harmful and most beneficial to the aspirant, is the main function of religion. Such regulated activity is called svadharma. Religion does not fetter man's free-will. It leaves him quite free to act, but tells him at the same time what is good for him and what is not. The responsibility is entirely and solely his. He cannot escape it by blaming fate, for fate is of his own making, nor by blaming God, for He is but the dispenser of fruits in accordance with the merits of actions. You are the master of your own destiny. It is for you to make it, to better it or to mar it. This is your privilege. This is your responsibility.
D: I quite realise this. But often it so happens that I am not really the master of myself I know for instance, quite well that a particular act is wrong, at the same time, I feel impelled to do it. Similarly, I know that another act is right, at the same time, however, I feel powerless to do it. It seems to me that there is some power which is able to control or defy my free-will. So long as that power is potent, how can I be called the master of my own destiny? What is that power but fate?
HH: You are evidently confusing together two distinct things. Fate is a thing quite different from the other which you call a power. Suppose you handle an instrument for the first time. You will do it very clumsily and with great effort. The next time, however, you use it, you will do so less clumsily and with less effort. With repeated uses, you will have learnt to use it easily and without any effort. That is, the facility and ease with which you use a particular thing increase with the number of times you use it. The repeated and familiar use will leave behind a tendency to use it. The first time a man steals, he does so with great effort and much fear; the next time both his effort and fear are much less. As opportunities increase, stealing will become a normal habit with him and will require no effort at all. This habit will generate in him a tendency to steal even when there is no necessity to steal. It is this tendency which goes by the name vasana. The power which makes you act as if against your will is only the vasana which itself is of your own making. This is not fate. The punishment or reward, in the shape of pain or pleasure, which is the inevitable consequence of an act, bad or good, is alone the province of fate or destiny. The vasana which the doing of an act leaves behind in the mind in the shape of a taste, a greater facility or a greater tendency for doing the same act once again, is quite a different thing. It may be that the punishment or the reward of a past act is, in ordinary circumstances, unavoidable, if there is no counter effort;but the vasana can be easily handled if only we exercise our free-will correctly.

continued....

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2082 on: August 20, 2016, 02:48:19 AM »
Fate and Free will -A dialogue with H.H Sri Chandrashekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal continued...

D: But the number of vasanas or tendencies that rule our hearts are endless. How can we possibly control them?
HH: The essential nature of a vasana is to seek expression in outward acts. This characteristic is common to all vasanas, good and bad. The stream of vasana, the vasana-sarit, as it is called, has two currents, the good and the bad. If you try to dam up the entire stream, there may be danger. The sastras, therefore, do not ask you to attempt that. On the other hand, they ask you to submit yourself to be led by the good vasana current and to resist being led away by the bad vasana current. When you know that a particular vasana is rising up in your mind, you cannot possibly say that you are at its mercy. You have your wits about you and the responsibility of deciding whether you will encourage it or not is entirely yours. The sastras enunciate in detail what vasanas are good and have to be encouraged and what vasanas are bad and have to be overcome. When, by dint of practice, you have made all your vaasanas good and practically eliminated the chance of any bad vasanas leading you astray, the sastras take upon themselves the function of teaching you how to free your free-will even from the need of being led by good vasanas. You will gradually be led on to a stage when your free-will will be entirely free from any sort of colouring due to any vasanas. At that stage, your mind will be pure as crystal and all motive for particular action will cease to be. Freedom from the results of particular actions is an inevitable consequence. Both fate and vasana disappear. There is freedom for ever more and that freedom is called moksha.

Concluded.

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2083 on: August 22, 2016, 10:03:46 AM »

Dear Sri Ravi

Thanks for posting this excellent dialogue between Sri Chandrasekhara Bharati Mahaswamigal with this disciple on the topic of "Fate & Free Will" .  Of course the debate on fate v/s free will is never ending so best is for people to see the truth of the same in their own lives .

However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Nagaraj

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #2084 on: August 22, 2016, 12:48:46 PM »
Thanks Sri Ravi, I had always wanted to share this, but was always worried at the size and i always could never post this. It was to be done by you.

Here is another beautiful incident -

A disciple was fortunate enough to get, after much difficulty, permission to meet His Holiness one evening. In the course of his talk, he boldly spoke thus: "Many a disciple coming to Sringeri returns disappointed for want of opportunities to hear a word of blessing or of encouragement or of advice from Your Holiness' lips. They will be greatly benefited if your Holiness can be more accessible."

H.H.: "You are mistaken. Those who seek to converse with me are mostly interested in matters in which I have no interest. They have no interest in matters in which I have interest. What purpose is served by granting interviews to them?"

Disciple: "I quite agree. But there are still some people who genuinely seek guidance from Your Holiness."

H.H.: "Seek help from me? Why, they want me to cure their illness or maladies? They want my help as a doctor. Is it for this, that this great institution was founded by the great Acharya?"

Disciple: "There are a few persons who long to approach Your Holiness for spiritual guidance but to their great regret are denied that opportunity."

H.H.: "If they really and sincerely long for my guidance they will in spite of my seeming inaccessibility force themselves upon me". With His characteristic smile, He added, "Just as you have done."

The disciple understood this both as a hint and as an admonition and did not deem it proper to pursue the subject further.


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« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 12:51:49 PM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta