Author Topic: Rough Notebook-Open Forum  (Read 283693 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1800 on: March 20, 2016, 10:23:52 AM »
Dear Sadhak,

Sins here refers to Jnani's committed sins before he obtained Jnana.  So also the merits.

Arunachala Siva. 

Sadhak

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1801 on: March 20, 2016, 10:54:15 AM »
Dear Subramanian,

Of course sins and merits are before one is a jnani.  For a jnani, it might be more appropriate to say he cannot accumulate good and bad karmas. Because there is no 'he'.

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1802 on: March 20, 2016, 12:55:44 PM »
Dear Sadhak,

I agree.  However a Jnani can also accumulate sins unwittingly.  For example, Bhagavan Ramana accidentally
stepped on a bush containing bees.  He immediately took the punishment by showing the leg so that bees
could sting at it to their hearts' content. Similarly, while walking on the Hill, He might have stepped on
ants, small reptiles etc., without knowing.

Arunachala Siva.

Sadhak

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1803 on: March 20, 2016, 07:14:38 PM »
Dear Subramanian,

Yes. But strictly speaking even in the example of Bhagawan, there is no accumulation of sins. He allowed the hornets to sting and inflict pain on the body. But Bhagawan was not the body. So the bad karma did not and could not affect him though they affected the body. When the mind (ego) is destroyed, the 'I am the body' attachment is also destroyed.

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1804 on: March 21, 2016, 06:52:01 AM »

Adi Sankara and Tiru Jnana Sambandha: 

Adi Sankara lived after Tiru Jnana Sambandha.  Tiru Jnana Sambandha's birth is roughly estimated
around 6 Century AD.  Sri Sankara has lived sometime in 7th Century AD. In Sri Soundarya Lahari,
Sri Sankara has sung only about Tiru Jnana Sambandha.  He calls him as Dravida Sisu, the
son of Dravida land.  Sri Kanchi Chandrasekara Saraswati also has said that this reference is about
Tiru Jnana Sambandha. The dates mentioned above are rough estimates by Sri Neelakanta Sastri,
in his book History of South India.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1805 on: March 22, 2016, 06:57:16 AM »

Chandikeswara:

Chandikeswara was a brahmin.  His poorvasrama name was Vichara Sarman.  He was a pious
Siva devotee, doing his rituals and meditation as of a brahmin.  One day, he saw the cowherd,
beating a cow, which had just then begot a calf and was very weak.  Seeing the cowherd, he told
him that cows should not be beaten.  Then he decided to herd the cows himself.  The cows belonged
to various brahmins of Cheyur, the town to which he belonged.  His father also agreed.  Vichara
Sarman then took the cows to the outskirts having grasslands and thick trees and plants and grazed
the cows.  The animals because of good feed and also seeing the brahmin loving them, started oozing
out the milk on their own. They also gave a lot of milk to the owners at home.  Once Vichara Sarma
saw the cows oozing out milk and so he decided to do a Siva Puja in the jungle itself.  He made a Siva
Linga with sands and water, did oblations with milk and offered the jungle flowers and bhilwas
that were available.  One day, a townsman saw this and thought Vichara Sarma was wasting
the milk intended for the owners.  He complained to his father. The father next day came to the place,
without Vichara Sarman's knowledge and found the cows pouring out milk on the Siva Linga.
He became angry and kicked the milk pots.  He also kicked the Siva Linga.  He beat Vichara Sarman. 
The boy on seeing the blasphemy of his father in kicking the Siva Linga, took out his stick, which became
an axe immediately, and cut off his two legs.  The father fell down with huge cry and bleeding.

Siva appeared before him and said:  "Vichara Sarman, I have found your immense bhava-bhakti which
has made you even to cut off the legs of your father.  You can come to my Abode and be my guardian
angel in the temples."  He also raised his father from death.  Vichara Sarman thus became Chandikeswara,
the guardian angel of Siva temples.  We can see even today, his shrine to the right of Siva Linga, near
the outlet for the holy waters, milk and turmeric that are poured for oblations to Siva.  The devotees
should go to him and mark their presence to Chandikeswara.  Siva also offered to give the food, flowers
and clothes to Chandikeswara. That is why, the cooked rice and the flowers and clothing of Siva are
used by priests to adorn Chandikeswara also.  When the devotees go near Chandikeswara, they should
not clap their hands loudly, as if Chandikeswara is deaf.  They should spread their left palm and slowly
place the three middle fingers of right palm, without making noise. Giving a thread from the clothes,
which is the prevalent practice is also not correct.

Chandikeswara's story happened in Cheyur, [Chey=Son], because Muruga stayed their with his army,
while on his way to kill Surapdama and his brothers, who were demons.           

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1806 on: March 22, 2016, 07:00:08 AM »



There is a small town called Suruttapalli, near Kanchipuram. There is a Siva temple there. 
Here Siva is in a different form, which is rare.  Here He is lying like Mahavishnu, on the laps
of Uma.  The Puranic story goes that after consuming halahala poison, Siva became tired and
was resting, keeping his head on the laps of Uma.  This Siva temple also follows some different
procedure.  They place shadari [paduka] on your head and give you only spoons of water.
No vibhuti.  No breaking of coconuts.

This Siva temple was renovated some years back, by Kanchi Kamakoti Math.  When Kanchi Sri
Chandrasekhara went to that temple, he composed a Sanskrit verse:  "O Father! Please take rest. 
You have done something which even Vishnu could not do.  You have driven out the fears of devas
about the poison.  Please wake up early and bless us all."

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1807 on: March 23, 2016, 06:52:12 AM »



Varatunga Rama Pandyan, was a later period chieftain, with the suffix name of Pandyan.  While
he was in his death bed, his wife asked him whether he was afraid of death.  The poet-king replied:

Why should I be afraid, my dear wife?
I am seeing Siva's abhaya hand.
I am seeing his bracelets with wreathed serpents.
I am seeing his waist cloth made of tiger's skin.
I am seeing his red matted locks with crescent moon.
I am seeing his golden feet with nicely sounding anklets.
I am seeing his grace-emitting divine face.
I am seeing his three starry eyes.
I am seeing his neck with the dark poison mark.
I am seeing his sacred thread, which are again snakes!
I am seeing his forehead with vibhuti in three lines.
I am seeing his pick axe and the fire on his hands
I am seeing the slender-waisted Uma on his left.
I am seeing the white total form of Siva, Pal Vannan.
Where is the fear for me?
Why should I be afraid?

If every devotee could see such god's divine form, without
any thought of dying, such vision alone should take him to
the god's abode, without fail.

(Source: Tamil Stray Verses.  K. Subramania Pillai,
Santha Publishing House, Chennai.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1808 on: March 23, 2016, 06:57:04 AM »



I shall write about one stray Tamizh verses.  Most of us know Guru Namasivaya who was the disciple
of Guhai Namasivaya. Both Guru Namasivaya and Guhai Namasivaya were living in Arunachala and has
sung many songs on Arunachaleswarar. These have been published by Sri Ramanasramam.

Guru Namasivaya has also sung some stray verses.  He once went to Chidambaram to have darshan
of the Dancing God of Golden Court, Nataraja in Chidambaram.  Upon seeing Nataraja he sang:

O Siva who gives boons to devotees everyday without fail, I shall make one request to you.  You are
ever dancing keeping your gunchitapatam, raised.  While your left foot is ever raised, to protect the
devotees, your right foot is ever stamping on Apasmara, Muyalakan, the demon.  Are you not getting
tired like this, for ever keeping one raised foot and keeping the other foot stamping on the demon? 
Why not you stop and take rest for some time?

The perennial dance, Anavarata Tandavam can never stop. If it stops, the universe will cease to exist,
with everything becoming a cosmic dust.  And a new kalpa has to start.  Even though the illustrious
poet knows this, he sang out of compassion for the restless Siva.  The ever dancing Siva, is Achala in Tiruvannamalai and the Mother who was watching His dance in Chidambaram, has merged into Him, as Ardhanari, in Tiruvannamalai.  See Bhagavan Ramana's Navamani Malai verse 1.

"The Non-moving Siva dances [moves] in Chidambaram in his cosmic dance, while Achala, the
Mother, Sivakamavalli is watching. He is Achalan, the Non moving with Mother, Achalai. merging
into Him and that is Arunachala, please understand!" 

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1809 on: March 23, 2016, 11:18:15 AM »
Panguni Uththiram:

Today is the Panguni Uththiram star day.  This day is famous for gods also. 

1. Only on this day, Siva married Parvati in Himalayas.

2.  Muruga on this day, married Deivayanai in Tirup Param Kundram.  After killing the three brothers
who were demons and who were giving many many troubles to Gods,  Indra was happy to give his
daughter Deivayanai in wedding to Muruga.

3. On this day, Maha Vishnu took Sri Devi on his right chest.

4. On this day, Brahma took Saraswati on his tongue.

5. On this day, Indra took to the hands of Indrani.

In Muruga temples and Siva temples, this day is celebrated as the wedding day of these gods.

Arunachala Siva.   

Sadhak

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1810 on: March 23, 2016, 12:37:41 PM »
Dear Subramanian,

I have heard that Rama married Seetha on this day also. Anyway all Murugan temples along the girivalam path were crowded last night because it was full moon as well as Tuesday.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1811 on: March 23, 2016, 01:55:17 PM »
Dear Sadhak,

Yes. Rama and Sita were also married on a Panguni Uththiram day!

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1812 on: March 24, 2016, 06:54:31 AM »

The question we need to ask is: what is the most important thing that we need to do with our lives?
Leave aside the  duties of supporting and raising a family.  Leave aside the necessity of earning a living.
The most important duty we have to ourselves is to be true to our nature, our "swadharma",
and this at whatever the cost for who does not agree with Thoreau's observation that, "Most men lead
lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them."

Bhagavan Ramana did not encourage people to renounce the world.  He advised dispassion and
questioning of the assumptions we automatically make ourselves and others.  We lead for the
most part a mechanical existence whether we are aware of it or not.  We take our opinions from
newspapers and TV news channels.  What Bhagavan Ramana advised was discrimination
between what is eternal and what is ephemeral.

We should be wary of an easy escape by thinking that we can do nothing.  Thoreau said:
"As if you could kill time, without injuring eternity!"  Time is precious.  Bhagavan's daily routine
was fixed by the clock.  He would go for days without speaking and yet the asramam would be
unaffected because there was a discipline and purpose to each activity, which gave the day
momentum and meaning.  In the midst of activity Bhagavan sat in silence and moved as if alone.
There was a solitude to Him which was impervious to the round of events.  He was the Sun
around which the devotees spent their days and thoughts. His constant and unfathomable
abidance in, for want of a better word, what we call the Self, was a source of joy and awe for
those who were open to its manifestation.  The few words He spoke, the small amount of literature
He wrote, were all cherished for nothing was wasted.  Each word was meant, each gesture had
significance. One wonders what Thoreau would have made of an encounter with Bhagavan.
One imagines Thoreau would have found in Bhagavan the answer to his search for meaning and in a
face to face encounter words would have been discarded.  For Thoreau wrote: "Could there a greater
miracle take place than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant?"

During his last years, Thoreau suffered from incurable tuberculosis, and slowly faded away over a number of years. But he was writing articles for journals even in bed as an invalid.  When his aunt asked him:
"Whether he had made peace with God", Thoreau replied:  "I did not know we had ever quareled!"

Among his last dying words were:  "Now comes good sailing!"

Let us leave Thoreau the final word:  "It is not what you look at, that matters, it is what you see."

(Source: As indicated in Arunachala Ramana Boundless Ocean of Grace)

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1813 on: March 24, 2016, 06:59:50 AM »


W.E. Channing who was a close friend of Thoreau and his first biographer, commented after his
death that, "No man had a better unfinished life."  For what are we to make of a man with great
talents who apparently loafed his way through life?  One of the most memorable statements of
Thoreau concerned this very issue, "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps
it is because, he hears a different drummer. Let his step to the music which he hears, however
measured or far away."  [Thoreau's Walden].

Here was a person who in the face of social and peer pressure resolutely 'listened to his inner call'
and fulfilled his 'swadharma', not as someone who visibly accomplished something in the world,
but one who walked on the woods and observed the beauty and precision of nature.  "I went to the
woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could
not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived."
His insights and lucid descriptions have inspired generations of writers too numerous to list here.

Thoreau's example challenges us to ask what then does it mean to lead a fulfilled life in which all
one's virtues and skills are exercised to the limit of human possibility?  Is it in the accumulation of
wealth, social power and respect by one's peers?  Is it in doing good deeds and helping the less
fortunate?


So the question here is why so much as how.  How can we lead a simpler life in this day and age
with its superfluity of impressions, desires and fears brutally shoved into our faces by inane electronic equipments in our homes as well as at work? We do have a choice and it is not necessarily a radical
one of renouncing the world and living in association with an ashram or similar institution.  Our daily
life is composed of small choices over which we have some degree of control.

We do have choice whether or not to switch on a television, we have a choice and can say no when
offered the latest gadget which will make us the envy of our friends.  Even in situations, where we have
no manoeuvre, we still have a choice whether to indulge in despair or anger, or remain calm.

(Source: As indicated above)

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1814 on: March 25, 2016, 07:00:49 AM »


Varatunga Rama Pandyan, was a later period chieftain, with the suffix name of Pandyan.  While he
was in his death bed, his wife asked him whether he was afraid of death.  The poet-king replied:

Why should I be afraid, my dear wife?
I am seeing Siva's abhaya hand.
I am seeing his bracelets with wreathed serpents.
I am seeing his waist cloth made of tiger's skin.
I am seeing his red matted locks with crescent moon.
I am seeing his golden feet with nicely sounding anklets.
I am seeing his grace-emitting divine face.
I am seeing his three starry eyes.
I am seeing his neck with the dark poison mark.
I am seeing his sacred thread, which are again snakes!
I am seeing his forehead with vibhuti in three lines.
I am seeing his pick axe and the fire on his hands
I am seeing the slender-waisted Uma on his left.
I am seeing the white total form of Siva, Pal Vannan.
Where is the fear for me?
Why should I be afraid?

If every devotee could see such god's divine form, without any thought of dying, such vision alone
should take him to the god's abode, without fail.

(Source: Tamizh Stray Verses.  K. Subramania Pillai,
Santha Publishing House, Chennai.)

Arunachala Siva.