Author Topic: Rough Notebook-Open Forum  (Read 379064 times)

cefnbrithdir

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1305 on: February 22, 2015, 07:00:52 PM »
Dear Sri Navi

Thank you for preserving your post to myself and others of the writing  of manikkavachakar. This is a wonderful verse and there is much else  in your post for me to ponder. I did see this straightaway and would have wished to have acknowledged it earlier  but in the light of the way the thread subsequently developed I thought it best to be silent. I understand why you removed this and other posts and welcome your decision.

I also appreciated your further post on 'beyond the I' - your expression of an 'unlimited I' was for me  a felicitous one.

Bhagavan first gave me moments of the peace "which passeth all understanding" for which I will be forever grateful. His wonderful smile looks at me in the room where most of my sadhana takes place. I am also immersed and affected by the teaching of Sri Siddharameswhar  Maharaj and his disciple/devotee Sri Ranjit Maharaj - both also extraordinary men. Their  clarity and the radicality of their understanding has helped me greatly. Devotion is an essential part of their teaching and it is the essential unity of bhakti and jnana which is imparted. Understanding must feed devotion and devotion feeds understanding ( wherever you start from) in a ever deepening 'helix', if you will. Did not Bhagavan espouse also this unity - and is not  all his teaching  under the 'umbrella' of his devotion to Arunachala ?

But what is beyond the 'unlimited I' - the 'I am' of consciousness and knowledge - is also an integral part of their teaching with much consequence for different 'layers' of our human journey and potential.  For that which  is truly unchanging and Unmanifest and for that which  is  changing and Manifest, however complete in consciousness.  The intertwining of Bhakti and Gnana will, with Grace, get us to 'unlimited I' and once here a 'stepping down' to  a completely selfless Devotion and the Grace that flows from this  to what is beyond any I.

The implications of this are relevant both to our sadhana 'on the way up', so to speak, and if we should ever come to such a  height, with Grace and loss of doership, on  a 'stepping  down' to  enlighten others.

Clarity as to what is Real and what is not is then  close to  the crux of things. In our sadhana, and in our being in the world, it is the understanding that our thinking selves, and all that is Manifested to us, is not Real that will  deepen our Devotion and help us to  deal with our external  responsibilities without being  affected by them.  And it is the spiritual power 'beyond any I' but nevertheless within the Manifest, embodied by the Sadguru,  that will come to  us and makes us One with HIM.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2015, 07:05:23 PM by cefnbrithdir »

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1306 on: February 23, 2015, 06:45:18 AM »
cefnbrithdir,
Thanks very much for your exquisite post.It is truly a joy to see how devotees in different corners of this globe are quietly pursuing their sadhana with genuine love for the guru and the teachings that are truly universal.Nice to know how sri Bhagavan,sri siddharameshwar maharaj and sri Ranjit maharaj continue to inspire and guide you.

Quote
The intertwining of Bhakti and Gnana will, with Grace, get us to 'unlimited I' and once here a 'stepping down' to  a completely selfless Devotion and the Grace that flows from this  to what is beyond any I

How wonderful this is-This is how Nochur Sri Venkatraman,a truly blessed devotee expounds the teachings of 'nAn yAr' of Sri Bhagavan.The upasana and vichara are intertwined .The Srimad bhagavatham is such a scripture and when King parikshit was cursed by a Rishikumara that he would die in 7 days time,it was not Bhagavad gita that came to the rescue(very fine as its teachings are) but the words of Sage Suka who expounded the Bhagavatha as a perfect blend of Bhakti and Jnana.Such is the beauty and wonder of this great scripture Srimad Bhagavatham-the reason being that it not only expounds the principles but also how those principles were embodied in the life of great devotees.In dwelling on the life of the devotees,the Love and wisdom they embodied seeps into the receptive mind.Nothing can be easier and effective than this.

Quote
Understanding must feed devotion and devotion feeds understanding ( wherever you start from) in a ever deepening 'helix', if you will. Did not Bhagavan espouse also this unity - and is not  all his teaching  under the 'umbrella' of his devotion to Arunachala ?
Wonderfully said!

This is what Srimad Bhagavatham is all about.You have said it so wonderfully.Sri Ramakrishna used to describe Bhagavatham as  'A Sweet fried in the butter of Knowledge and steeped in the honey of Love'.

Our Friend Graham here loves Srimad Bhagavatham as i could see from his few posts.It would be nice if we can get to listen more from him on the thread meant for the same.Our friend jewell has off and on shared few excerpts there.

Appropos the Blending of Jnana and Bhakti-this very phrase has been used by Sri Bhagavan when he described Yogi Sri Krishnaprem(Ronald Henry Nixon) when he visited Bhagavan.This meeting is wonderfully captured by a letter he wrote to his friend Sri Dilip Kumar Roy-Dilip Da wrote a very fine biography 'Yogi Krishnaprem'.In fact Krishnaprem is a perfect blend of Bhata,Yogi and Jnani rolled in one.

I will wind up this with an excerpt from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna:

M: "Isn't it possible to develop both jnana and bhakti by the practice of spiritual discipline?"
MASTER: "Through the path of bhakti a man may attain them both. If it is necessary, God gives him the Knowledge of Brahman. But a highly qualified aspirant may develop both jnana and bhakti at the same time. Such is the case with the Isvarakotis-Chaitanya for example. But the case of ordinary devotees is different.

"There are five kinds of light: the light of a lamp, the light of various kinds of fire, the light of the moon, the light of the sun, and lastly the combined light of the sun and the moon. Bhakti is the light of the moon, and jnana the light of the sun.Sometimes it is seen that the sun has hardly set when the moon rises in the sky. In an Incarnation of God one sees, at the same time, the sun of Knowledge and the moon of Love.
"Can everyone, by the mere wish, develop Knowledge and Love at the same time? It depends on the person. One bamboo is more hollow than another. Is it possible for all to comprehend the nature of God? Can a one seer pot hold five seers of milk?"

M: "But what about the grace of God? Through His grace a camel can pass through the eye of a needle."
MASTER: "But is it possible to obtain God's grace just like that? A beggar may get a penny, if he asks for it. But suppose he asks you right off for his train fare: How about that?"

M. stood silent. The Master, too, remained silent.

Suddenly he said: "Yes, it is true. Through the grace of God some may get both jnana and bhakti."

M. saluted the Master and went back to the bel-tree.

Namaskar




atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1307 on: February 23, 2015, 01:27:31 PM »
CONVERSATIONS WITH ANNAMALAI SWAMI

Q: Is it better to meditate for long periods of time or for short
periods?

AS: Except when one is in the sleep state, the effort to meditate should continue always. Just like the river which is flowing constantly towards the sea, our awareness should flow without a
break. We should not have this concept that we should meditate at certain times. The meditation on the Self should continue while walking, working, eating, etc. It should be naturally flowing in all places at all times.

- Living by the Words of Bhagavan
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

cefnbrithdir

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1308 on: February 23, 2015, 07:02:28 PM »


Dear Sri Navi

Thank you for your kind words and especially for bringing Srimad Bhagavatham to my attention. I very much look forward to becoming acquainted with this work.

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1309 on: February 23, 2015, 08:03:10 PM »
Talk 121
Talks between the Master and two Moslems on a previous occasion.
D :
Has God a form?
M :
Who says so?
D :
Well, if God has no form is it proper to worship idols?
M :
Leave God alone because He is unknown. What about you? Have you a form?
D :
Yes. I am this and so and so.
M :
So then, you are a man with limbs, about three and a half cubits high, with beard, etc. Is it so?
D :
Certainly.
M :
Then do you find yourself so in deep sleep?
D :
After waking I perceive that I was slept. Therefore by inference I remained thus in deep sleep also.
M :
If you are the body why do they bury the corpse after death? The body must refuse to be buried.
D :
No, I am the subtle jiva within the gross body.
M :
So you see that you are really formless; but you are at present identifying yourself with the body. So long as you are formful why should you not worship the formless God as being formful?
The questioner was baffled and perplexed.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1310 on: February 23, 2015, 08:15:39 PM »
cefnbrithdir,

Quote
I very much look forward to becoming acquainted with this work

I warmly recommend Swami Prabhavanada's abridged edition of this great work.It preserves the essence of this work and presents it in an easy readable style.The Kindle edition costs less than a Dollar in amazon.com!
You may like to check this out:
http://www.amazon.com/Srimad-Bhagavatam-The-Wisdom-God/dp/8178233150

This would be a good starting point to get familiar with this work and soak in its sweetness and wisdom.

Namaskar

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1311 on: February 24, 2015, 07:01:52 AM »
cefnbrithdir/friends,
Here is the Preface to Srimad Bhagavatham by Swami Prabhavananda(This was written  half a century ago):

PREFACE

 AFTER the Upanishads and the Bhagavadgita, the Srimad BhAgavatam is the most authoritative of the Indian Scriptures. By means of stories from the lives of AvatAras, sages, devotees, and kings, it popularizes the truths contained in the Vedas. At this moment more than two hundred million Hindus find in it their most cherished expressions of religious faith and their dearest exemplars. To study it is the best of all ways to become acquainted with the living religion of India. Its peculiar excellence is that it reconciles the heart with the head, devotion with learning. " It is fried in the butter of Knowledge,' says Sri Ramakri$na, latest of Indian prophets, " and steeped in the honey of Love." Only the more generally interesting portions of the work-amounting to somewhat less than half of the whole-are included in the present version. Of this version, again, about half is summary and paraphrase rather than translation ; the remainder, however, consisting of the teachings of Sri Krishna to his disciple Uddhava (Book XI), has been rendered without omission and with approximate literalness. Everywhere the primary object has been to interpret in English the inner spirit of the Sanskrit text. In no form hitherto, so far as I am aware, has the Bhagavatam  been readily available to the English-speaking public. In revising my translation for the press, I am happy to acknowledge, I have had  the assistance of my friends Jane Manchester and Frederick Manchester.

PRABHAVANANDA

I have posted the story of King Ambarisha from this book in the 'Excerpts from Srimad Bhagavatham' thread.

Namaskar
« Last Edit: February 27, 2015, 07:02:43 AM by Ravi.N »

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1312 on: February 26, 2015, 07:14:05 PM »
CONVERSATIONS WITH ANNAMALAI SWAMI
Q. How am I to know if I am making any progress in my meditation?
AS: Those who meditate a lot often develop a subtle form of ego.
They become pleased with the idea that they are making some progress; they become pleased with the states of peace and bliss that they enjoy; they become pleased that they have learned to exercise some control over their wayward minds; or they may derive some satisfaction from the fact that they have found a good guru or a good method of meditation.
All these feelings are only ego feelings. When ego feelings are present, awareness of the Self is absent. The thought 'I am meditating? is an ego thought. If real meditation is taking place, this thought cannot arise.
Don't worry about whether you are making progress or not.
Just keep your attention on the Self twenty-four hours a day.
Meditation is not something that should be done in a particular position at a particular time. It is an awareness and an attitude that must persist throughout the day. To be effective, meditation must be continuous.
If you want to water a field you dig a channel to the field and send water continuously along it for a lengthy period of time.
If you send water for only ten seconds and then stop, the water sinks into the ground even before it reaches the field. You will not be able to reach the Self and stay there without a prolonged, continuous effort. Each time you give up trying, or get distracted, some of your previous effort goes to waste.
Continuous inhalation and exhalation are necessary for the continuance of life. Continuous meditation is necessary for all
those who want to stay in the Self.
- Living by the Words of Bhagavan
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1313 on: February 27, 2015, 06:20:40 AM »
Sri Ramana Maharshi: ~~~ Day by Day, 8-5-46.
Q.:
When I reach the thoughtless stage
in my sadhana I enjoy a certain pleasure,
but sometimes I also experience a vague fear
which I cannot properly describe.
M.:
You may experience anything,
but you should never rest content with that.
Whether you feel pleasure or fear,
ask yourself who feels the pleasure or the fear
and so carry on the sadhana
until pleasure and fear are both transcended
and all duality ceases and the Reality alone remains.
There is nothing wrong in such things
happening or being experienced,
but you must never stop at that.
For instance,
you must never rest content with the pleasure of laya
experienced when thought is quelled
but must press on until all duality ceases.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1314 on: February 27, 2015, 06:26:06 AM »
Talking of the `witness' should not lead to the idea that there is a witness and something else apart from him that he is witnessing. The `witness' really means the light that illumines the seer, the seen and the process of seeing. Before, during and after the triads of seer, seen and seeing, the illumination exists. It alone exists always.
~ Sri Ramana Maharshi
...from 'Day by Day with Bhagavan', 18-7-46
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1315 on: February 27, 2015, 06:30:21 AM »
Hari/Friends,
Excerpt from 'Sri Ramakrishna,The Great Master' by Swami Saradananda:

14. What Vaikunthanath said of the Master's love for Narendra
At one time in the year 1883, a friend of ours(Swami saradananda is referring to Vaikunthanath sanyal-Ravi) came to Dakshineswar and saw the Master extremely anxious, because Narendranath had not come for a long time. He says, "The Master's mind became full of Narendra, as it were: he spoke of nothing else but Narendra's good qualities. 'Look here,' said he addressing me, 'Narendra is a man of pure Sattva; he, I have seen, is one of the four  belonging to the 'Abode of the Indivisible' and one of the 'Seven Rishis'. There is no limit to his good qualities.' Saying so, the Master became much worried and was shedding incessant tears like a mother separated from her child. Afterwards, seeing that he was by no means able to control himself and considering what we should think of that behaviour of his, he went with a rapid step to the verandah to the north of his room. Weeping bitterly for some time he, we heard, sobbed out these words with a choked voice: 'Ah! I cannot do without seeing him!' Controlling himself a little after some time, he came into the room and sat down beside us, saying pathetically and sorrowfully, 'I wept so much, but Narendra did not come; the longing to see him has produced a terrible anguish as if my heart was wrung; but he does not at all realize the intensity of the attraction I feel for him.' Saying so he became worried again and went out of the room. Returning to the room a little later, he said, 'What will they think to see that I, a man of such advanced age, am weeping and panting so much for him? You are amongst the people who are my own; I don't feel ashamed in your presence. But, what will others think when they see it? But I can by no means control myself.' We were speechless to see the Master's love for Narendra. We thought Narendra must be a godlike person. Why otherwise was the Master so much attracted towards him? We then said consoling him, 'Ah, it is very wrong of him, sir; he knows you feel so much pain on account of his absence and still he does not come.' Shortly after this event, one day he introduced me to Narendra. I saw that the Master was as delighted when united with Narendra as he was worried when separated from him. We went later to Dakshineswar on the Master's birthday. The devotees that day adorned him beautifully -dressed him up in new attire, flower-garlands, sandal-paste, etc. Kirtan was being sung in new verandah to the east of his room, near the garden. Surrounded by the devotees, the Master listened to it, now entering into ecstasy, now making the Kirtan interesting by interposing extempore a line or two. But he could not enjoy the bliss fully on account of the absence of Narendra. He looked around from time to time and said to us, 'Narendra, I see, has not come.' At about noon Narendra came and bowed down at his feet in the assembly of the devotees. As soon as the Master saw him, he jumped up, sat on his shoulders and went into ecstasy. Afterwards coming to the normal state, he engaged himself in conversing with and feeding him. He listened to the Kirtan no more that day."

15. Although an especial object of the Master's love, Narendra remained unmoved; this demonstrates his uncommon fitness for spirituality One is surprised to think of the love that is rarely to be found even amongst the gods, of which Narendra was the recipient when he came to the Master. One clearly understands how strong his love for truth was, when one finds that in spite of that unusual ceaseless shower of selfless love, he remained firm and unmoved and went forward to test the Master at every step so that he might attain the wholly unalloyed truth. Surprising as it was, the other side, namely, the Master's magnanimity and absence of egoism, was no less amazing. When one finds that, instead of feeling wounded on account of that unbecoming mood of Narendra's, he submitted himself gladly to be so tested in order that the disciple might have the satisfaction of realizing spiritual truths thoroughly investigated by himself, one's surprise simply transcends all limits. Thus the more we study the relation of the Master with Narendra, the more are we charmed to see the eagerness, on the part of the one, to accept all things only after testing them and, on that of the other, to bring home high spiritual truths to the disciple by submitting to the tests. We shall then understand how a true Guru teaches a highly qualified disciple by keeping intact his spiritual attitudes and how at last he occupies for ever a place of high regard and reverence in the heart of the disciple.

continued....
« Last Edit: February 27, 2015, 06:36:42 AM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1316 on: February 27, 2015, 06:57:20 AM »
Excerpt From 'Sri Ramakrishna,The Great Master' continued...

6. The erroneous impression of the ordinary people about Narendra
 Just as Narendra saw the Master's purity, renunciation and single-minded devotion and became attracted to him since the first meeting, even so, the Master, it seems to us, was charmed to see his boundless self-confidence and love of truth and made him his own from the first day they met. If we leave aside the Master's Yogic visions about Narendra's greatness and glorious future and try to find out the cause of their wonderful mutual attraction, what we have said before becomes evident. People in general, devoid of insight, regarded Narendra's wonderful self-confidence as arrogance, his boundless vigour as insolence, and his austere love of truth as a feigning or as an example of undeveloped intellect. It is doubtless that they came to that conclusion from seeing his absolute indifference to people's praise, his plain-speaking, his free and unhesitating behaviour regarding all matters and, above all, his disdain to conceal anything for fear of anybody. One of his neighbours, we remember, said to us about Narendra before we had been acquainted with him: 'There is a boy in that house; I have never seen a more hopelessly spoiled one than he; having taken his B.A. degree he has become extremely vain, as if the vast world did not count at all with him; he starts singing audaciously in the presence of his father and other superiors, keeping time on kettle drums with his palm and distended fingers; he goes along smoking a cigar in the presence of the elders of the quarter; and so on in all matters.' One day, shortly after this, we went to the Master-perhaps it was our second or third visit to him-and heard him narrating Narendra's good qualities thus:
 
7. The author heard Narendra's praise from the Master.
 
Speaking with Ratan, the chief officer of the garden house of Jadunath Mallick, and pointing to us, the Master said, "These boys are good. This boy has passed one and a half examinations (I was preparing for the F.A. examination that year), he is polite and calm; but I have not seen another boy like Narendra-he is as efficient in music, vocal and instrumental, as in the acquisition of knowledge, in conversation as well as in religious matters. He loses normal consciousness in meditation during whole nights. My Narendra is a coin with no alloy whatsoever: ring it and you hear the truest sound. I see other boys somehow pass two or three examinations with the utmost straining. There it ends, they are a spent-up force. But Narendra is not like that; he does everything with the greatest ease; to pass an examination is but a trifle with him. He goes to the Brahmo Samaj also and sings devotional songs there; but he is not like other Brahmos-he is a true knower of Brahman. He sees light when he sits for meditation. Is it for nothing that I love Narendra so much?" We were charmed to hear those words and, desiring to be acquainted with Narendra, asked him, "Sir, where does Narendra live?" The Master replied, "Narendra is the son of Viswanath Datta of Simla, Calcutta.?" Afterwards, when we returned to Calcutta and made inquiries, we came to know that the young man, so much praised by the Master, was the very person whom our friend, his neighbour, had calumniated so vehemently. Quite astonished, we thought how improper our judgments on others? characters often turn out to be when we base them on the casual activities of those persons!

 8. The author's erroneous impression about Narendra at his first meeting with him.

It will not be out of place here to mention another incident connected with this topic. One day we had the good fortune to meet Narendranath at the house of a friend, a few months before we heard the Master describing his good qualities in that manner. That day we only saw him but did not like to have a talk with him on account of an erroneous impression. But the words he spoke that day were so deeply imprinted on our memory that even after the lapse of many decades it seems that we have heard them but yesterday. Before describing them, the circumstances under which we heard those words should be narrated; otherwise one will fail to understand why we carried that wrong impression about Narendranath on that occasion.

9. The author's first meeting with Narendra at a friend's house.

The friend in whose house we saw him that day had hired a two-storeyed building in front of Narendra's dwelling house at Gaur Mohan Mukherjee's Lane in the Simla quarter. We had been fellow-pupils in the same school for four or five years. Two years before our friend was to appear for the Entrance examination, he set out for England, but could not proceed farther than Bombay. Failing in his ambition, he became the editor of a newspaper, wrote essays and poems in Bengali and rose to be an author of a few books. He had been married a short time previously. After that event we heard from many sources that he was living an indifferent moral life and that he did not hesitate to earn money by various dishonest means. It was only for the purpose of ascertaining the truth of this that we went without notice to his house that day.

continued...
« Last Edit: February 27, 2015, 07:09:41 AM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1317 on: February 27, 2015, 07:02:00 AM »
Excerpt From 'Sri Ramakrishna,The Great Master' continued...

10. The outward behaviour of Narendra at that time.
 
Sending him word through a servant, we were sitting in a room of the outer apartment, when a young man entered the room and lolling against a bolster began humming a Hindi song in an absolutely nonchalant manner, which indicated his familiarity with the owner of the house. The song, as far as we remember, related to Sri Krishna; for, the two words 'Kanai' and 'flute' distinctly fell on our ears. We could not view the young man with a kind eye inasmuch as his song about the 'black one's flute' and his familiarity with our unprincipled friend were associated in our minds with his dress which, though not smacking of up-to-date fashions, was clean, his hair which was well tended and his looks of absent-mindedness, easily mistaken for coldness. Seeing him behave unabashedly in that manner and smoke tobacco afterwards, ignoring our presence altogether, we happened to receive the impression that he was a faithful follower of our unprincipled friend and that the latter had acquired his evil ways by mixing with such young men. Anyway, we also did not try to get introduced to him as he assumed an attitude of great indifference and continued to be in his own mood even though he noticed us.

 11. Narendra's talk on literature with the friend.

Our boyhood friend came out shortly after and speaking to us a word or two only though we met each other after a long interval, began delightfully to talk on various subjects with the young man. Though we did not like that indifference of his, we thought it was against etiquette to take leave suddenly and were listening to the conversation on English and Bengali literatures, which our friend, the litterateur, had with the young man. Although, when they began the conversation, they were to a great extent agreed as to the function of high class literature, namely, that it should correctly express human sentiments, there arose a difference of opinion between them regarding the question whether a composition expressing any and every kind of human sentiment should be called literature only because it correctly represents it. Our friend, as far as we can remember, took up the affirmative position, whereas the young man held the contrary opinion. He refuted our friend's position and tried to convince him that no composition, simply by virtue of its expressing a sentiment, good or bad, correctly, could be classed as a piece of high class literature if it did not accord with good taste and establish a high ideal. In support of his own position, the young man mentioned the books of the famous English and Bengali literary men beginning with Chaucer and showed, how each of them gained immortality because he adhered to this high principle. The young man said in conclusion, "Although man feels all kinds of good and bad sentiments, he has always been straining to express some particular ideal in his mind. It is only in the realization and manifestation of that particular ideal that all the difference between man and man exists. Thinking that the enjoyment of sights, tastes, etc., is permanent and real, ordinary men make the realization of it the aim of their life. They idealize what is apparently real. There is little difference between those people and beasts. High class literature can never be created by men of this type. There is another class of men who, unable to remain satisfied with the realization of the pleasure of enjoying what is seemingly real, feel higher and higher ideals within and are anxious to mould all outward things after that pattern-they want to realize the ideal.It is this class of men only who create real literature. Again, those among them who have recourse to the highest ideal and try to realize it in life, have generally to stand outside worldly life. I have seen the Paramahamsa of Dakshineswar alone to have realized that ideal in life. That is why I have reverence for him."

12. We came to be acquainted with Narendra's greatness through the Master.
 
We were, of course, astonished with the scholarship of the young man and his power of expressing those profound ideas; but we were disappointed to think that there was no agreement between his words and actions inasmuch as we found a close relation existing between him and our friend. We then took leave of our friend. We were charmed to hear from the Master the above-mentioned catalogue of Narendra's good qualities a few months after this event and went to his house to be introduced to him. When we came to know that the young man seen by us before was the Master's much-praised Narendranath our astonishment knew no limit.

13. The Master recognized Narendra from the beginning.

Ordinary people, contented with walking along the beaten track, happened very often to regard Narendra as arrogant and insolent and of improper conduct, when they saw his external behaviour; but the Master never fell into that error. From the very start of their acquaintance, he could understand that Narendra's 'arrogance and insolence' arose from his great self-confidence, which was the result of the extraordinary mental power hidden within him, that his absolutely free behaviour indicated nothing but the self-control natural to him, and that his indifference to the respect shown by people arose from the self-satisfaction due to his pure character. He had the conviction that later on the extraordinary nature of Narendra would fully blossom like a lotus of a thousand petals and would be established in its own incomparable glory and greatness. Coming then into collision with the world, scorched by miseries, that arrogance and insolence of his would melt into infinite compassion, his extraordinary self-confidence would re-instil hopes in the broken-hearted and his free behaviour, remaining within the bounds of control in all respects, would point out to others that self-control alone was the path to real Freedom.

Excerpts from 'Sri Ramakrishna,The Great Master'-Swami saradananda.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2015, 07:18:34 AM by Ravi.N »

atmavichar100

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1318 on: February 27, 2015, 01:29:41 PM »

Q: What is the correct way to pursue self-enquiry?

AS: Bhagavan has said: 'When thoughts arise stop them from
developing by enquiring: "To whom is this thought coming?" as soon as soon as the thought appears. What does it matter if many thoughts keep coming up? Enquire into their origin or find out who has the thoughts and sooner or later the flow of thoughts will stop.'
This is how self-enquiry should be practiced.

When Bhagavan spoke like this he sometimes used the analogy of a besieged fort. If one systematically closes off all the entrances to such a fort and then picks off the occupants one by one as they try to come out, sooner or later the fort will be empty. Bhagavan said that we should apply these same tactics to the mind.

How to go about doing this? Seal off the entrances and exits to the mind by not reacting to rising thoughts or sense impressions. Don't let new ideas, judgments, likes, dislikes, etc. enter the mind, and don't let rising thoughts flourish and escape your attention.

When you have sealed off the mind in this way, challenge each emerging thought as it appears by asking, 'Where have you come from?' or 'Who is the person who is having this thought?9 If you can do this continuously, with full attention, new thoughts will appear momentarily and then disappear. If you can maintain the siege for long enough, a time will come when no more thoughts arise; or if they do, they will only be fleeting, undistracting images on the periphery of consciousness. In that thought-free state you will begin to experience yourself as consciousness, not as mind or
body.

However, if you relax your vigilance even for a few seconds and allow new thoughts to escape and develop unchallenged, the siege will be lifted and the mind will regain some or all of it former strength.

Living by the Words of Bhagavan

However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Jewell

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Re: Rough Notebook-Open Forum
« Reply #1319 on: February 27, 2015, 10:38:47 PM »
Dear Sri Ravi,

Thank You with all my heart for the beautiful words about Swami Vivekananda!
I enjoy so much reading about Him...


With love and prayers,