Author Topic: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough  (Read 757153 times)

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5130 on: October 20, 2017, 11:56:27 AM »
Sri Paul Brunton:
"This inquiry into the true self is the simplest system of mediation I know, and therefore the most suited to the busy man of the present age. It is quicker to grasp and simpler to practice than the complicated Yoga systems of the East. It may advantageously be practiced by anyone who cares to ascertain the truth about his own nature."




Dear Devotees,

I cannot say anything about other systems of meditation, because when I started practicing Atma-vichara spontaneously,  I even didn't know that meditation is concentrating on a single thought or an Ideal to the exclusion of all others, leave aside concentrating on and attending to only and only the sense of 'I' within me. Therefore, indeed, I found Sri Bhagwan's Inquiry to be a very simple system of meditation, easy to grasp and simple to practice.


 
Dear devotees, Sri Brunton writes further about this meditation (inquiry into true self) as follows:
Sri Brunton: "Spiritual unfoldment is not to be haphazard thing it so often is among us, but a steady and serious effort. An ordered and regular daily practice in mediation will naturally lead to advancement in the art. In other words, as you continue the method less and less effort will be needed to produce the same result. Progress depends upon practice."



Dear devotees, Inquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan will produce best results by not only being regular every day, that is, during only an allotted time daily  for the purpose, but soaking in the experience of peace and happiness obtained during mediation, one must endeavour to hold the current of awareness always whenever one remembers it.
Therefore, one must practice this meditation as regularly as eating and make it a habit. The best habit a man can ever make is that of meditation. What happens is like this:

As one perseveres in this practice of meditation in the form of inquiry, progressively less and less effort will be needed, as Sri Brunton said, and thus absorbs in something by repeated daily efforts. One surely begins to find in time that the mental quiet obtained during this meditation becomes the most cherished joy of all, and begins to look for it spontaneously. Thus the Inquiry becomes a looked-for joy rather than a disciplinary practice, and then one doesn't allow anything to interfere with it.


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
 Anil   
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 11:59:48 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5131 on: October 20, 2017, 03:11:27 PM »
Dear devotees, what follows is an excerpt from the book 'Hunting the 'I'', written by Sri Lucy Cornelssen:

Ramana Maharshi used the illustration of 'acting as the actor on the stage': he plays his part in full attention, devoting his whole capacity to the task in hand, but knowing all the while that he is not the king or the beggar of his role, but somebody else. We too have to be aware that as the 'person' we have to act our part on the stage of life, remembering all the time our true nature as pure Be-ing, the Self. Going beyond thinking by jnana, beyond feeling by bhakti, beyond self-willed action by karma marga means going beyond that 'I' which was from the very beginning, the birth of a genuine reflexive Identity, a 'wrong I'; it means nothing more or less than returning to the Source of Pure Consciousness. Thereafter...

"Your efforts can extend only thus far. Then the Beyond will take care of Itself. You are helpless there. No effort can reach It." (Talks, 197).

Here finally we meet the Great Experience of Ramana, the Maharshi, in Its second aspect, as the pure Power of the Beyond, Sakti.
"Some force, call it atmic power or anything else rose within me and took possession of me. I became a new man." (Day by Day, 22.11.45).

'I' and 'God' melted again into the One without a second that they always had been, beyond name and form, time and space... the divine mystery of Man.

To get this experience we have to transcend the biological status of the 'thinking mammal', which alone we are, according to the teachings of our natural sciences. And inadvertently they help to keep us bound by this status, because only by this deep ignorance about our true Nature are we blind towards those negative ways in which we are misused by our 'worldly' civilisation.







Dear devotees, the above excerpt need no explanation. However, regarding the last paragraph of the excerpt, I wish to say that transcendence of the biological status of thinking mammal does not mean that one who thus transcends ceases to think at all and becomes rather like an idiot.  In Oxford University Dictionary, the word 'transcendence' is defined as 'going beyond the limits of human knowledge, experience or reason'. So, expanding beyond the limits to infinity does not mean that what is within limits becomes inaccessible. What is meant is only this that in the absence of the thinker, thoughts would arise when there is a need, and would subside without creating any impression or vasana, when the need is over. Self being all, thinking does not take place apart from the Self. This is why Sri Bhagwan has taught that attending to the Self and remaining as the Self include attending to everything under the universe, for, the Self is universal or the universe is only the expanded Self.

Pranam,
 Anil   
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 03:16:14 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5132 on: October 20, 2017, 03:42:57 PM »
Dear devotees, Sri Sukadeva went to Sri Janaka for the final instruction about the Knowledge of Brahman. However, Sri Janaka said to him, "You must pay the Gurudakshina (Guru's fee) beforehand. For, when you attain the Knowledge of Brahman, you won't pay me my fee, because the Knower of Brahman sees no difference between the Guru and the Disciple".   

Dear devotees, the Guru, however, seeks no material offering from the disciple, but only the offering of  the spurious ego (the head), which says 'I', to the Lotus Feet of the Guru, which is Pure Awareness 'I-I'. Therefore, in my view, asking as Gurudakshina (Guru's fee) of ignorance in the form the ego-'I' from Sri Sukadeva was the Guru, Sri Janaka's final instruction about the Knowledge of Brahman to Sri Sukadeva.   Anil
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 03:44:48 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5133 on: October 20, 2017, 04:38:01 PM »
        Jnana is Lifeboat


 The Lord is of Infinite Grace,
 In His Celestial City are Love, Light and Peace eternal,
 To them that seek to know His Form
 And understand His Attributes
 And attain His Holy Feet
 To them, this is the Path
 This, this the boat to cross Life's turbulent waters.

Tirumantiram

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5134 on: October 21, 2017, 10:08:31 AM »
कबीरा  गरब  ना  कीजिये , कभू  ना  हासिये  कोय  |
अजहू  नाव   समुद्र  में , ना  जाने  का   होए  ||
Sri Kabir
   

Sri Kabir says that one should not take pride in one's achievement, and in one's possessions and position, etc. One should not laugh at or belittle others, for one's own life is like a boat in a sea; who knows what may happen the very next moment.

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5135 on: October 21, 2017, 11:15:33 AM »
Dear Devotees,

Once Swami Sri Yoganada visted  Sri Ramanasram with his secretary Sri C. R. Wright. Sri Wright asked following questions:

Sri C. R. Wright: How shall I realise God?
Sri Bhagwan: God is an unknown entity. Moreover He is external. Whereas, the Self is always with you and it is you. Why do you leave out what is intimate and go in for what is external?
Sri Wright: What is this Self again?
Sri Bhagwan: The Self is known to everyone but not clearly. You always exist. The Be-ing is the Self. 'I am' is the name of God. Of all the definitions of God, none is indeed so well put as the Biblical statement 'I AM THAT I AM' in EXODUS (Chap. 3). There are other statements, such as Brahmaivaham, Aham Brahmasmi and Soham. But none is so direct as the name JEHOVAH = I AM. The Absolute Being is what is - It is the Self. It is God. Knowing the Self, God is known. In fact God is none other than the Self.
Sri Wright: Why are there good and evil?
Sri Bhagwan: They are relative terms. There must be a subject to know the good and evil. That subject is the ego. Trace the source of the ego. It ends in the Self. The source of the ego is God. This definition of God is probably more concrete and better understood by you.
Sri Wright: So it is. How to get Bliss?
Sri Bhagwan: Bliss is not something to be got. On the other hand you are always Bliss. This desire is born of the sense of incompleteness. To whom is this sense of incompleteness? Enquire. In deep sleep you were blissful: Now you are not so. What has interposed between that Bliss and this non-bliss? It is the ego. Seek its source and find you are Bliss.






Dear devotees, Being is the Self. Existence is the Self. And it is not that we are totally oblivious of our own existence. It is known to us even in the state of relativity, albeit only partially. Just as the presence of the sun can be inferred from the feeble light filtering through not so dense clouds, the Presence of the Self can be inferred and understood from the 'feeling of existence' or 'feeling of being', or the sense of 'I', within every one of us. This is the window to glimpse the Divine and door to enter it.

This is why Sri Bhagwan has unceasingly taught that there is nothing new and external to obtain. On the other hand we have to only put an end to the imagination which makes us believe that we are other than the Bliss. For whom is this ignorance in the form of mere imagination? It is to the non-existent ego. And when we trace  the Source of the ego, being non-existent it is lost and Bliss remains over. Such is the simplicity of the immortal Teaching!

Dear devotees, Being or Existence is eternal. Sri Bhagwan has enjoined that the understanding that one is always That, Here and Now, is the Master Key for solving all doubts whatsoever. Though every Word of His Grace is a clue in itself, this is, in my view, the greatest clue to penetrate to the Core and realize the Self. The doubts arise in the mind. The mind is born of the ego. The ego rises from the Self. If the Source of the ego is searched the Self is revealed. That alone remains. Then we at once understand that the Brahmand (Universe) is only the expanded Self or Brahman!!   

Thanks very much.
Pranam,
 Anil
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 11:18:57 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5136 on: October 21, 2017, 12:15:59 PM »
Sadhu Sri Natanananda:

Just as the alphabet has 'A' as the first letter, the world has God as its source.
Tirukural

Because we perceive the world, we must agree unanimously that there is a Source with the power to become many.
Ulladu Narpadu

What is the nature of the Source or Primal Substance inferred by these words of Wisdom?
Is it imaginary or can it be seen?
If it can be seen, has anyone seen it?
Can one who has seen it show it to others?


Such questions about God have puzzled the intellectual world from the upanishadic period onwards.
Source: Sri Ramana Darsanam





Dear devotees, writing thus, and I fully concur, Sri Natanananda has written that it was Sri Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, appearing in North India in that era, who, in response to the most intense seeker Swami Sri Vivekananda, gave adequate answers thus:
"I have seen God! I have seen Him face to face! I am seeing God just as clearly as you are seeing me. Those who have seen the Truth can also show it to others. There is no room for doubt in these direct revelations."


Sri Natanananda writes that until the nineteenth century, no convincing answer was available to the three questions raised at the beginning of this post. Sri Ramakrishna, by giving adequate answer to these excellent questions revitalised the human race.

Pranam,
  Anil     
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 12:19:33 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5137 on: October 21, 2017, 03:33:22 PM »
Sri Bhagwan: There is no one who has not seen God. God-vision is natural to all. Ignorance consists in not being aware this natural experience of truth. As wrong knowledge is only the ego, the I-am-the-body idea, loss of ego means gaining God. Knowing oneself is knowing God, and knowing God is only abiding as the Self. As Self-realization is God-realization, Self and God are not different.



Dear Devotees,

So, Sri Bhagwan, appearing in the latter part of the nineteenth century in South India, shone as the Sun of the Self, and showered His Grace munificently on all who turned to Him. However, I have always felt that His Advent is to teach that there is no God apart from the person who sees Him, that there is no one who is not aware of his own being, that one's own being is God's being, and that 'being' alone is both the Self as well as God. Thus, Self-realization, which appeared few and far between, and difficult to attain, was demonstrated by Sri Bhagwan as an experience natural to all. Teaching to pay attention, in the beginning to inner feeling of 'I' which is a mental activity taking the form of a thought or a perception,  and then to a subjectively experienced feeling of 'I' which no longer connected with thoughts and objects, is unique in the annals of spiritual history. Many devotees, such as Sri Paul Brunton, Sri Arthur Osborne, etc., believe that Sri Bhagwan's Advent was to reveal this Path to suit this dark age when fake rajasic and tamasic persons are poising themselves as Gurus.

Thanks very much.
Pranam,
 Anil   
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 03:36:04 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5138 on: October 21, 2017, 03:44:24 PM »
WITH SRI RAMANA OF ARUNACHALA


I've wandered far: yes I have been
From land to land to land:
Sages I've seen, great king and queen,
The lowly, wise and grand.

But only there, -- at the Asramam
By Arunachalam, --
Have I known that joy without alloy,
I am! I am! I am!


Sri Grant Duff ( Sri Douglas Ainslie)

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5139 on: October 23, 2017, 10:44:42 AM »
मेरा मुझमे कुछ नही, जो कुछ है सो तोर |
तेरा तुझको सउपता, क्या लागई है मोर ||

Sri Kabir
   
I don't have anything of mine. Whatever I have belongs to God. Therefore, if I give Him what is already His, do I deserve any credit for doing something great?

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5140 on: October 23, 2017, 12:21:01 PM »
Mr. P.C. Desai introduced Mr. P.C. Dewanji (Retd. Sub-Judge) who was returning from Trivandrum, where he had presided over a section of the Philosophical Conference.

Mr. Dewanji asked Bhagavan, "What is the easiest way to attain one-pointedness of mind?"
Sri Bhagavan said, "The best way is to see the source of the mind. See if there is such a thing as the mind. It is only if there is a mind that the question of making it one-pointed will arise. When you investigate by turning inwards, you find there is no such thing as the mind."
Then Mr. P.C. Desai quoted Bhagavan's Upadesa Sara in Sanskrit to the effect, "When you investigate the nature of mind continuously or without break, you find there is no such thing as the mind. This is the straight path for all."
The visitor again asked, "It is said in our scriptures that God it is that creates, sustains and destroys all and that He is immanent in all. If so and if God does everything and if all that we do is according to God's niyati (law), and had already been planned in the Cosmic Consciousness. is there individual personality and any responsibility for it?"
Sri Bhagavan: Of course, there is. The same scriptures have laid down rules as to what men should or should not do. If man is not responsible, then why should those rules have been laid down? You talk of God's niyati and things happening according to it. If you ask God why this creation and all, He would tell you it is according to your karma again. If you believe in God and His niyati working out everything, completely surrender yourself to Him and there will be no responsibility for you. Otherwise find out your real nature and thus attain freedom.
Day By Day With Bhagwan





Dear Devotees,

'The best way is to see the source of the mind'. If this is understood, all else regarding Sri Bhagwan's Teaching of Enquiry becomes easy to understand. Mind is the thief. Will a thief betray itself? Can the mind ever find itself? Sri Bhagwan says that we ignore what is real and are holding onto the mind which is unreal and also trying to find what it is. The mind was not there in our sleep. It is now here in the waking state. It is impermanent, and therefore, cannot be found by us. That also means that we are not the minds which say we are so and so. So, thinking that one is the mind and seeking to check  or control it is akin to catching a shadow. Is it not? If there is the mind that it can be checked. But Sri Bhagwan emphatically taught that it was not.


 

Sri Bhagwan: Understand this truth by search. Search for unreality is fruitless. Therefore seek the reality, i.e., the Self. That is the way to rule the mind. There is only one thing Real!



In this way Sri Bhagwan drives home the point that the Real is what Is, the others are only appearances or shadows. Having thus been aware of Sri Bhagwan's Teaching, one should no longer remain engrossed in and taken up entirely by mere manifestations of the mind and ignore, to our great peril, the Atma-swarupa or the Self, which is the Substratum that really we are.


Therefore, dear devotees, as taught by Sri Bhagwan, there are only two ways. If one believes in God and in His Will working out all these appearances, one must surrender completely to Him and be done with all responsibility whatsoever. Such is the greatness of complete surrender! However, if one is unable to do so, one may certainly find out who really one is through the straight path of Vichara, and attain the purpose of life for which we came. 


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
 Anil       
« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 12:35:20 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5141 on: October 23, 2017, 04:08:43 PM »
Dear devotees, what follows is an excerpt from 'The Maharshi and His Message', a book comprising of three chapters, relating to Sri Bhagwan, from the famous book 'A Search In Secret India'. The book 'A Search In Secret India' is said to have made Sri Bhagwan known as a great Sage all over the world. In the following excerpt Sri Paul Brunton describes vividly and gives a picturesque account of his first meeting with Sri Bhagwan and the impact He made on him without uttering a single word, such that his outlook changed for ever. Therefore, let us slow sown our own thinking a little and savor the peace that Sri Brunton's mind experienced in the Divine Presence of Bhagwan Sri Ramana, and the Message he received in Silence. Hence, read Sri Brunton's predicament when he came inadvertently under the spell of Sri Bhagwan's Divine Silence in his own words:


 

I fold a thin cotton blanket upon the floor and sit down, gazing expectantly at the silent figure in such a rigid attitude upon the couch. The Maharshi's body is almost nude, except for a thin, narrow loin cloth, but that is common enough in these parts. His skin is slightly copper-coloured, yet quite fair in comparison with that of the average South Indian. I judge him to be a tall man; his age is somewhere in the early fifties. His head, which is covered with closely cropped grey hair, is well formed. The high and broad expanse of forehead gives intellectual distinction to his personality. His features are more European than Indian. Such is my first impression.   
The couch is covered with white cushions and the Maharshi's feet, rest upon a magnificently marked tiger skin.   
Pin-drop silence prevails throughout the long hall. The Sage remains perfectly still, motionless, quite undisturbed at our arrival. A swarthy disciple sits on the floor at the other side of the divan. He breaks into the quietude by beginning to pull at a rope which works a punka-fan made of plaited khaki. The fan is fixed to a wooden beam and suspended immediately above the Sage's head. I listen to its rhythmic purring, the while I look full into the eyes of the seated figure in the hope of catching his notice. They are dark brown medium-sized and wide open.   
If he is aware of my presence, he betrays no hint, gives no sign. His body is supernaturally quiet, as steady as a statue. Not once does he catch my gaze for his eyes continue to look into remote space, and infinitely remote it seems. I find this scene strangely reminiscent. Where have I seen its like? I rummage through the portrait gallery of memory and find the picture of the Sage Who Never Speaks, that recluse whom I visited in his isolated cottage near Madras, that man whose body seemed cut from stone, so motionless it was. There is a curious similarity in this unfamiliar stillness of body which I now behold in the Maharshi.   
It is an ancient theory of mine that one can take the inventory of a man's soul from his eyes. But before those of the Maharshi I hesitate, puzzled and baffled.   
The minutes creep by with unutterable slowness. First they mount up to a half-hour by the hermitage clock which hangs on a wall; this too passes by and becomes a whole hour. Yet no one dares to speak. I reach a point of visual concentration where I have forgotten the existence of all save this silent figure on the couch. My offering of fruit remains unregarded on the small carved table which stands before him.   
My guide has given me no warning that his Master will receive me as I had been received by the Sage Who Never Speaks. It has come upon me abruptly this strange reception characterised by complete indifference. The first thought which would come into the mind of any European, "Is this man merely posing for the benefit of his devotees?" crosses my mind once or twice but I soon rule it out. He is certainly in a trance condition, though my guide has not informed me that his Master indulges in trances. The next thought which occupies my mind, "Is this state of mystical contemplation nothing more than meaningless vacancy?" has a longer sway, but I let it go for the simple reason that I cannot answer it.   
There is something in this man which holds my attention as steel filings are held by a magnet. I cannot turn my gaze away from him. My initial bewilderment, my perplexity at being totally ignored, slowly fade away as this strange fascination begins to grip me more firmly. But it is not till the second hour of the uncommon scene that I become aware of a silent, resistless change which is taking place within my mind. One by one, the questions which I prepared in the train with such meticulous accuracy drop away. For it does not now seem to matter whether they are asked or not, and it does not matter whether I solve the problems which have hitherto troubled me. I know only that a steady river of quietness seems to be flowing near me; that a great peace is penetrating the inner reaches of my being, and that my thought-tortured brain is beginning to arrive at some rest.   
How small seem those questions which I have asked myself with such frequency? How petty grows the panorama of the last years! I perceive with sudden clarity that intellect creates its own problems and then makes itself miserable trying to solve them. This is indeed a novel concept to enter the mind of one who has hitherto placed such high value upon intellect.   
I surrender myself to the steadily deepening sense of restfulness until two hours have passed. The passage of time now provokes no irritation, because I feel that the chains of mind-made problems are being broken and thrown away. And then, little by little, a new question takes the field of consciousness.   
"Does this man, the Maharshi, emanate the perfume of spiritual peace as the flower emanates fragrance from its petals?"   
I do not consider myself a competent person to apprehend spirituality, but I have personal reactions to other people. The dawning suspicion that the mysterious peace which has arisen within me must be attributed to the geographical situation in which I am now placed, is my reaction to the personality of the Maharshi. I begin to wonder whether, by some radio-activity of the soul, some unknown telepathic process, the stillness which invades the troubled waters of my own soul really comes from him. Yet he remains completely impassive completely unaware of my very existence, it seems.   
Comes the first ripple. Someone approaches me and whispers in my ear. "Did you not wish to question the Maharshi?"   
He may have lost patience, this quondam guide of mine. More likely, he imagines that I, a restless European, have reached the limit of my own patience. Alas, my inquisitive friend! Truly I came here to question your Master, but now ... I, who am at peace with all the world and with myself, why should I trouble my head with questions? I feel that the ship of my soul is beginning to slip its moorings; a wonderful sea waits to be crossed; yet you would draw me back to the noisy port of this world, just when I am about to start the great adventure!   

But the spell is broken. As if this infelicitous intrusion is a signal, figures rise from the floor and begin to move about the hall, voices float up to my hearing, and wonder of wonders! - the dark brown eyes of the Maharshi flicker once or twice. Then the head turns, the face moves slowly, very slowly, and bends downward at an angle. A few more moments and it has brought me into the ambit of its vision. For the first time the Sage?s mysterious gaze is directed upon me. It is plain that he has now awakened from his long trance. 
The intruder, thinking perhaps that my lack of response is a sign that I have not heard him, repeats his question aloud. But in those lustrous eyes which are gently staring at me, I read another question, albeit unspoken.   
"Can it be - is it possible - that you are still tormented with distracting doubts when you have now glimpsed the deep mental peace which you - and all men - may attain?"
 The peace overwhelms me. I turn to the guide and answer:   
"No. There is nothing I care to ask now. Another time......"

Source: Maharshi And His Message





Dear devotees, if one person has attained it, certainly it is attainable by all men.
Pranam,
 Anil
« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 08:00:04 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5142 on: October 23, 2017, 04:47:08 PM »
Thou, the Jnana Embodied Goal
That seekers seek!
Thou, the heavens filling that Goal!
Thou, the Way Great that appeareth to me in rapture!
Thou, the Silentness that the ignorant know not!
Thou, the Beginning of all!
Thou, the goodly Seed of Liberation!
Thou, the Endless Bliss!
Thou, the charities and penances I perform!
Thou, I sought, to forget my I-ness.

Sri Thaymanavar

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5143 on: October 23, 2017, 04:52:38 PM »
On scrutiny, supreme devotion [parabhakti] and Jnana are in nature one and the same. To say that one of these two is a means to the other is due to not knowing the nature of either of them.
V. 722, GVK

Know that the path of Jnana and the path of bhakti are inter-related. Follow these inseparable two paths without dividing one from the other.
V. 731, GVK

Sri Bhagwan: Attending to Self is devotion to the supreme Lord, because the Lord exists as Self.
B 13, GVK



Sri Michael James: Since the state of supreme devotion (parabhakti) is the loss of individuality, it is nothing but the state of Jnana.

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3576
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5144 on: October 23, 2017, 08:01:32 PM »
On the day when the lotus bloomed, alas, my mind was straying, and I knew it not. My basket was empty and the flower remained unheeded.

Only now and again a sadness fell upon me, and I started up from my dream and felt a sweet trace of a strange fragrance in the south wind.

That vague sweetness made my heart ache with longing and it seemed to me that it was the eager breath of the summer seeking for its completion.

I knew not then that it was so near, that it was mine, and that this perfect sweetness had blossomed in the depth of my own heart.

Gitanjali, Sri Rabindranath Tagore