Author Topic: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough  (Read 758794 times)

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3990 on: December 06, 2014, 11:13:57 AM »
Quote from Sri Ravi:
What the muni has said is that that there should be 1. Discernment(questing mind) 2.Attraction(Bhakti) to get there(Diving deep within) and 3.Through control of Breath(The effort to remove all obstacles and distractions).This is a perfect interpretation.
It may ofcourse be explained in any other way .Explanations may differ but the process is clear-This is a triune path and not 'three paths'.


Dear Sri Ravi,

I find myself one with the above interpretation of the Verse 'hriday kuhare madhye'. Dear Sri Ravi Bhai Saheb, I am particularly happy with your interpretation "Attraction (Bhakti) to GET  THERE (diving deep within)". However, I wish to respond adequately to your post after  I solicit your insight regarding following statement made by Sri Reddy, about whom Sri Ganesan has spoken so highly, in his beautiful book 'Moments Remembered'.

"Sri Reddy went on to add: Scholars often dispute why Krishna omitted bhakti in this verse. Some scholars say that bhakti is in between Jnana and Karma. When I asked Bhagwan about this, He said that bhakti was not a separate path but was included in both Jnana Yoga and Karma Yoga. Without bhakti there can be no Jnana and Karma.  See the difference between Bhagwan's reply and the scholars reply.  If bhakti were in between Jnana and Karma, Krishna would have mentioned a three-fold path. THE  REASON  HE  MENTIONED  ONLY TWO  IS  BECAUSE,  AS  BHAGWAN  SAID,  BHAKTI  IS  AN  ESSENTIAL  PART  OF  BOTH  PATHS. Similar is the case here. 'Divin' is not a separate path, but is an essential part of both of 'seeking Self' and of
'breath control'. "

Thanks very much, dear bhai saheb.
Pranam,
  Anil



« Last Edit: December 06, 2014, 11:23:31 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3991 on: December 06, 2014, 11:56:34 AM »
Anil Bhai,

Quote
Scholars often dispute why Krishna omitted bhakti in this verse. Some scholars say that bhakti is in between Jnana and Karma

No comments on this-I have not heard any scholar discussing thus.What I do know is  the view generally held by some that jnana and karma are opposed to each other.Our friend udai used to quote Sri sankara's statement that only 'jnana' can dispel ignorance and not 'karma' -for example.I do not intend to go into this for now-for karma can be done in two ways-as kamya and nishkamya.Sri Sankara refers to the kamya karmas here.Nishkamya karma is not different than jnana and is an integral part of it.
Karma is the effort aspect-and no one would say that without effort ignorance can be ended.

Quote
When I asked Bhagwan about this, He said that bhakti was not a separate path but was included in both Jnana Yoga and Karma Yoga. Without bhakti there can be no Jnana and Karma.
This is how kavyakanta ganapathi muni has explained that wonderful verse.Sri Bhagavan is also saying the same thing.
Such being the case why should Balarama Reddy term Kvyakanta's explanation as tinged with his study of traditional scriptures(???) and taking Sri Bhagavan's statement as if it is new revelation ,distinguished from some scholars(who?).
What is the clarification that Sri Balarama Reddy provided to Sri Ganesan?I cannot comment on this.That is for Sri Ganesan to say.
I can only say that Bhagavan's response only confirms Kavyakanta's wonderful insight.There was no confusion in what the muni has stated-The only confusion was in taking it as 'three paths'(separate) and not as a triune path.
Namaskar.

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3992 on: December 06, 2014, 03:26:17 PM »
Friends,
This is the month of kartigai and the deepam was lit yesterday.it was during this time that kavyakanta ganapathi Muni met the Brahmana swami and named him as Bhagavan sri Ramana maharshi-the name which is now dear to devotees all over the world.I wish to share the account of Sri Ganesan from The Human Gospel of Sri Ramana Maqharshi.

It is late nineteenth century, ancient Benares, India. A fourteen-year-old boy sits amidst a group of scholars: mathematicians, poets, a music maestro, and an astrologer, among others. The mathematicians give him a six-digit number multiplied by another six-digit number. One poet recites the last two lines of a Sanskrit verse and challenges the boy to compose the first two lines in the same meter and complete it. The other poet, meanwhile, gives him a subject to immediately compose a four-line Sanskrit verse. The astrologer places before him a complex pattern of planetary positions and asks him what the consequence will be. The musician hums a few notes of a particularly obscure raga and asks the boy to identify it. Another man rattles off a random date, like February 18, 1756, and asks what day that was. As if all this weren?t enough, another man stands behind the boy and throws tiny pebbles on his back while the others throw their challenges. The boy is expected to simultaneously keep count of how many pebbles were thrown. The boy answers all of them, instantaneously, correctly . . . brilliantly, to the tumultuous applause of an admiring audience. The boy is none other than Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni, soon to become one of the foremost devotees of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi. This boy-wonder, Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni, soon gained acclaim all over India. (―Muni means one who is steeped in psychic powers.) Before he was born, his parents, a pious couple, had no children. His father went to Benares and prayed at the Ganesa temple there. He had a vision that the idol of Lord Ganesa came to life and merged with him. At the very same time back in his village, his wife who was in the local Devi temple saw the idol turning to light and the light appeared to enter her. Soon afterward, a son was born to the couple, and they named him Ganapati, in gratitude to Lord Ganesa.However, to their utter disappointment, the boy could not talk at all. Until the age of five, he remained mute and expressionless. Moreover, he was plagued with every possible disease, including epilepsy. In desperation, in order to cure him, they resorted to the age old practice of branding him with a red-hot, iron rod. This treatment however, had far-reaching effects. The shock unleashed the boy?s latent talents, and he became exceptionally brilliant.
His retention power, his concentration, his capacity to repeat, and to remember knowledge increased manifold. By the age of nine, he had Mastered Sanskrit literature, and by the age of eleven, he had memorized all the four Vedas and Upanishads. When he was fourteen years old, Ganapati had composed a drama in Sanskrit, which even today is acclaimed as one of the best Sanskrit dramas ever.
The ancient scriptures mention that the rishis of yore did penance, and God appeared before them and granted them boons. Strongly influenced by these texts, Kavyakantha sought to achieve the same. He got married when he was eighteen years old, but his fervor to have God?s Darshan became more intense. He embarked on a long pilgrimage, visiting temples as well as all the sacred rivers like the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the Godavari, doing penance or tapas wherever he went. His penance was rigorous: he remained silent and motionless for long periods and went without food.
Though he meticulously obeyed all the rules of traditional penance, God was not apparent before him. According to Hindu tradition, if one does not find God through one method of penance, there are alternate methods. With every method failing, Kavyakantha finally took the last resort: doing penance in the five holy places of Shiva. These five holy places dedicated to Shiva represent the five elements: Earth, Water, Fire, Air, and Ether. One must visit each place in a particular order and arrive finally in the place dedicated to Fire, i.e. Arunachala. A devotee?s tapas or penance is said to be rewarded here, and he is finally united with God (or Shiva). Kavyakantha followed the necessary rituals and reached Arunachala in 1904.

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3993 on: December 06, 2014, 03:35:15 PM »
Kavyakanta ganapathi Muni continued....

During the course of his penance in Arunachaleshwara temple, he went up the hill and saw Bhagavan sitting with eyes closed, absorbed in Samadhi. Consequently, Kavyakantha did not receive the glance of grace and went away, disappointed. While still pursuing his practice, he took up a job in the city. In 1907, he became dejected and felt that his life was futile. He decided to give his search for God one last try. ―I am going to Arunachala again, which, the scriptures declare is the final destination for one?s search for God. If I do not have God?s Darshan this time, I am going to proclaim that the Vedas, Upanishads, and all the Hindu scriptures are just exaggerations of poetic minds- With this resolve and remedies exhausted, he returned to Arunachala.
Around Arunachala, there is a Shiva shrine located on each of the eight directions. Determined to perform his penance to the best of his capacity, he went south west to the Nirudhilingam shrine. It was surrounded by forests at that time. He took shelter in the hollow of a large, dead tree and resumed his severe penance of being silent and going without food. After the fifth or sixth day, the Divine Mother spoke to him: ―Until you have a guru, you cannot achieve your goals. Your guru is up there on the hill. Surrender at his holy feet, and you will get his grace. Go now.
Kavyakantha leapt out of the hollow. It was one o?clock in the afternoon, and the sun was beating down hard. The Karthikai festival was on, and thousands of people thronged around the hill. Undeterred, he ran up the hill to Virupaksha cave and most extraordinarily, there was no one else there. Bhagavan, seated alone outside the cave, directed his glance of grace at Kavyakantha. Like many devotees before him, he was transfixed, eyes locked on one another, and he could not take his eyes off Bhagavan. Kavyakantha, an erudite scholar, had never prostrated himself before any human being. But in that moment, he found himself flat on the ground in front of this young ascetic.
He held Bhagavan?s feet tightly and cried, ―I have read all that has to be read. I have fully understood Vedanta, I have performed japa to my Heart?s content, yet I have not, up to this time, understood what tapas really is! Therefore, I have sought refuge at your feet. Pray, enlighten me as to the nature of tapas.‖ The word ―tapas‖ in Sanskrit literally means ―striving for the realization of Truth through penance and austerity.‖ However, Bhagavan imparted its deeper meaning to Kavyakantha.
Helping him rise to his feet, Bhagavan looked into his eyes and after some time slowly replied, ―'If one watches from where the notion  'I? arises, the mind is absorbed into that. That is tapas. And since Kavyakantha had himself revealed that he practiced mantra japa, repeating mantras thousands of times every day, the Master added, ―'When repeating a mantra, if one watches the source from which the sound is produced, the mind is absorbed in that. That is tapas.'
These revelations thrilled Kavyakantha. He finally understood how to be in touch with the Truth through a practical method. Wave after wave of ecstasy flooded through him for hours in the presence of the ascetic. At last, when he opened his eyes he asked the attendant, Palani Swami, for the ascetic?s name. Though he was then called Brahmana Swami, he learned that his real name was Venkataraman. Kavyakantha took ―Ramana‖ from his name and since he had seen God reflected in this ascetic, he named him ―Bhagavan.‖ Bhagavan in Sanskrit means God. As he had also given a revelation about tapas, which no scripture had ever explained before, according to Kavyakantha, Bhagavan was also a Vedic rishi. (Rishi means ―sage‖ and is derived from ―drashtra,‖ which means ―seer‖: one who has seen with the ―inner eye‖ and not just with the mortal eyes.) But to Kavyakantha, Bhagavan was not only a rishi, but a Maharshi, or a great rishi. Therefore, the name, Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi came to be.
This name, ―Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi,the chanting of which has lured countless people to the silent still Truth, was given by this gifted Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni. At that time he had over two hundred disciples of his own, including noble scholars like Devarata and Kapali Shastri. He wrote a letter to them saying, ―I have found my guru. Henceforth it is not I, but Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi who is our guru.‖
The next day he went to Bhagavan and said, ―Bhagavan, please accept me.‖ Bhagavan graciously conceded to his request and said, ―Stay in the cave, which is adjacent to Virupaksha cave-Called Mango Tree cave, its proximity to Virupaksha cave allowed the guru and disciples to visit each other every day. Bhagavan continued to share his grace and help Kavyakantha mature spiritually.

continued....

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3994 on: December 06, 2014, 03:39:21 PM »
Kavyakanta ganapathi Muni continued....

Bhagavan held Kavyakantha in high esteem and addressed him with much respect. One day Kavyakantha held Bhagavan?s feet and begged, ―Please do not address me respectfully, Bhagavan! I am your disciple and your child. Do not address me in such reverential terms!‖ Yet Bhagavan continued to do so. He then learned from his other disciples and Kavyakantha?s admirers that they referred to him as Nayana. ―Nayana‖ means father in Sanskrit. Therefore Bhagavan told Kavyakantha, ―Hereafter, I will call you Nayana.‖ Nayana accepted this because Nayana in Sanskrit also means disciple or child.
It is interesting to note that Kavyakantha was a staunch devotee of Shiva, the formless father aspect of God. He had never worshipped God in the aspect of the Mother, Shakti or form. However, from the moment the Mother showed his guru to him, he became her devotee as well. (The side of the town with the Arunachaleshwara temple is called the front of the hill. The stretch from Nirudhilingam to the Eshanyalingam, south-west to north-east, is the back. A little known fact about Arunachala is that the front is the father aspect, while the back is the mother aspect. All miracles and powers?psychic, spiritual, physical, or worldly?stem from the mother aspect. In the lives of Bhagavan?s devotees, miracles and visions took place between Nirudhilingam and Eshanyalingam. With Kavyakantha too, it was at Nirudhilingam that the Mother aspect guided him to his guru.)
He wanted to express his gratitude to the Mother by composing a thousand verses in Sanskrit in her praise. He surrendered to Bhagavan and began work after seeking his permission. He chose a sacred day to complete all thousand verses. Unfortunately he fell ill and could only write only around seven hundred verses.The night before his self-imposed deadline, he approached Bhagavan at Virupaksha cave with his problem. Bhagavan encouragingly reassured him, ―Do not worry, I will come and sit with you.‖ It was a wonderful sight: the young Master sitting, radiating silence, his older devotee dictating extempore verses in a torrential flow, and his disciples writing them down late into the night, around the lantern light. Genius that he was, Kavyakantha started dictating the first line of the first verse to the first disciple, the first line of the second verse to the second disciple, the first line of the third verse to the third disciple and so on. Then he proceeded without stopping to dictate the second line of the first verse to the first disciple, the second line of the second verse to the second disciple, the second line of the third verse to the third disciple . . . until at one-thirty in the morning, the thousand verses were complete. Bhagavan, who until then was sitting with eyes closed, in rock- like silence, opened his eyes and asked, ―Have you taken down all that I dictated?‖ Kavyakantha fell at his guru?s feet and cried ―Yes Bhagavan, they are your verses!‖
This anthology of verses is called Umasahasranaamam. Uma is the Divine Mother, while Sahasranama in Sanskrit means thousand?therefore the title can be translated as ―Thousand Verses in Praise of the Divine Mother.‖ Kavyakantha revised the first seven hundred and odd verses many times but left untouched the verses that he dictated that wonderful night, verses which he felt came from Bhagavan.

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3995 on: December 06, 2014, 03:44:55 PM »
Kavyakanta ganapathi Muni continued....

When I went to Ramanashram some people, for whom I had respect, often spoke ill of Kavyakantha. They claimed that his accounts were figments of his imagination. I was influenced by their views on the genius. Even today there is a lot of literature that portrays Kavyakantha in a poor light. I approached Munagala Venkataramaia, a distinguished scholar and one of the recorders of the talks with Bhagavan. Now, Munagala had not seen Kavyakantha and was therefore neutral about him. ―Why do people pull down Kavyakantha so much?‖ I enquired, listing out all the transgressions he is rumored to have made. ―Ganesan, stop!‖ he exclaimed. ―How did you know all this?‖ I revealed the names of the people who told me this. He replied, ―They have given an opinion and you have received it. Are you sure it is the Truth?‖ I was puzzled. ―How can we know which opinion is correct?‖ I asked. Munagala then said, ―Whatever Bhagavan says is trustworthy.‖
I was still not satisfied. I had read a tiff that Kavyakantha was not a Self-realized soul because he had so many sankalpas. His detractors often quoted this too, and I was convinced by this logic. I put forth my argument to Munagala. He told me, ―I asked Bhagavan the same thing?how come it is written in such and such a book that Kavyakantha was not Self-realized. Bhagavan told me, ‗That is not what I said, but what the recorder must have expected me to say.‖ Munagala then advised me, ―Go by whatever Bhagavan has said, and you will be near the Truth. Do not go by opinions, particularly if they divide people?whether saints or anyone else. Do not pay heed to them. Aspirants should never be carried away by negative statements made about any sage or saint. In order to progress, this is the first guideline to remember. What detractors say are just opinions and if we believe them, we fall victim to the mind.
It is true that Kavyakantha had very high ideals. However, they are not merely sankalpas, but satya sankalpas. A sankalpa is a concentrated desire of wanting to achieve something. A satya sankalpa is that sankalpa which comes to you?not that you have a desire for it. Kavyakantha had three satya sankalpas: His first sankalpa was that he wanted India to be free. Kavyakantha?s second satya sankalpa was equal status for women in Indian society. With Christian and Muslim influences over many centuries, women were often subjugated and relegated to the kitchen. They were allowed no participation in society. However, Vedic culture stated that women must have equal rights. In the Vedic Age, many women like Vasishta?s wife, Arundati, and Yajnavalkya?s wife, Maitrayi, were considered jnanis or realized beings. Thirdly, he sought for Vedic culture to be revived.
He placed these before Bhagavan. In 1908, Kavyakantha had asked Bhagavan, ―Is aspiring to the source of the I-thought sufficient for the attainment of all my aims, or is mass incantation or mantra japa needed?‖ Bhagavan replied, ―Aspiring to the source of the I-thought will suffice.‖ Though this was the initial advice Bhagavan shared with him, Kavyakantha pressed on with his argument, ―What about my aims and ideals?‖ Bhagavan replied, ―It will be better if you throw the entire burden on the Lord. He will carry it, and you will be free. He will do his part.‖
Munagala Venkataramaia told me, ―People quote these sentences. But Bhagavan told me what happened afterward. At first, Kavyakantha could not grasp the inner meaning of Bhagavan?s counsel. After a few years, he came to Bhagavan and said, ‗Bhagavan I am surrendering all my sankalpas at your holy feet.? There was no greater guru than Bhagavan for him.

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3996 on: December 06, 2014, 03:52:22 PM »
Kavyakanta ganapathi Muni continued....

It is interesting to see how all three of Nayana?s satya sankalpas were, in time, fulfilled. Nayana passed away in 1936, and India gained her independence in 1947. The Chief Minister of Madras State was a devotee of Bhagavan. Therefore he wanted the national flag to be hoisted not in the state capital Madras, but at Ramanashram. This created a furor in the state, but the Chief Minister adamantly said, ―I will go to my Master.‖ He approached Bhagavan and insisted, ―You must hoist the national flag.‖ It is a little-known fact: to the delight of all present, Bhagavan hoisted the flag. Then he turned to my Teacher, T. K. Sundaresa Iyer and said, ―Our Nayana's sankalpa is fulfilled.‖
Nayana?s second sankalpa was also fulfilled by Bhagavan when he recognized Maha Samadhi for a woman, his mother. At that time it defied Hindu tradition. Now we venerate Anandamayi Ma, Mother Krishna Bai, Godavari Maatha, Shobanamma and many others. The exalted status of these women sages and saints, amongst others, was accepted by Hindu society only after the advent of the Ramana Gita. Now Bhagavan?s words are quoted: that there is no difference between male or female. We must not forget that it was Kavyakantha, because of whom this wisdom was drawn out from Bhagavan. His second sankalpa found further fulfillment when Ramanashram appointed a woman as its manager of the School for the Vedas. This was to Kavyakantha's credit. He also contributed to her predecessor Major Chadwick?s appointment, as the Vedapathashala?s first manager. Being a westerner, this was unthinkable back then in India.
Nayana and his disciples plied Bhagavan with questions. Though the answers were not immediately noted down, Nayana had such a clear memory that later he condensed Bhagavan?s answers into verses and recited them, saying, ―This is from the third chapter of Ramana Gita,‖ or ―This is the eighth verse from the second chapter in the Ramana Gita.‖ He had not yet written Ramana Gita and people used to wonder at his claims. Then, finally one day, he sat down and wrote the entire Ramana Gita of three hundred verses. He wrote the questions with their answers and showed them to Bhagavan, who verified each one of them and remarked, ―Perfectly correct.
Devotees of Bhagavan are universally grateful to Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni: Firstly, he was the one who recognized and shared with the Master his celebrated, sacred name. Secondly, he was the first person who persuaded our Master to start talking. Before him, Sivaprakasam Pillai, Gambhiram Seshayya, and others assumed Bhagavan was in formal silence and received Bhagavan?s answers in writing. It was only to Kavyakantha that Bhagavan started giving answers orally. He was also the one who insisted that Bhagavan write a poem in Sanskrit in the arya meter. Bhagavan replied that he knew very little of Sanskrit and its meters. Kavyakantha explained the rules of the arya meter and repeated his request. A day later, Bhagavan presented to an amazed Kavyakantha, two flawless verses. Then, on the following day, he presented three more. These five verses are none other than Arunachala Pancharatnam, a hymn that is chanted daily in front of Bhagavan's Samadhi.

continued...
« Last Edit: December 06, 2014, 03:58:41 PM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3997 on: December 06, 2014, 04:08:01 PM »
Kavyakanta ganapathi Muni continued....

In the Ramana Gita, one of Bhagavan's answers about women is most revealing. Nayana questions Bhagavan, ―Are not women equal to men?‖ Bhagavan answers, ―What is woman or man? It is based on the body. For the soul, there is no difference.‖ Then Kavyakantha asks, ―Then is it possible for women to Master the scriptures?‖ Bhagavan replied, ―Without a doubt.‖ Nayana went on, ―Can women get Self-realization? Do they become jnanis?‖ ―Without a doubt,‖ the guru said. ―For the soul, which has to achieve realization, there is no difference.‖
In 1922, when Bhagavan's mother realized Maha Samadhi, it was not Bhagavan who wanted to entomb her, glorify her, or build a temple for her. It was Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni who helped carry her body to the present Ramanashram. He told Bhagavan, ―According to the scriptures and your words in the Ramana Gita, she is a realized soul. Therefore, she should be entombed with all sanctity.‖ He administered this task, and it was around her Samadhi that the Matrabhuteshwara temple in Ramanashram was constructed. He even assigned the temple its name: Matrabhuteshwara, meaning ―the Lord who has become the mother.‖ Thus, the idea of the temple, the nucleus, around which Ramanashram was built, came from Kavyakantha. We therefore owe a great deal to this saint, who silently and gracefully worked in the background all the while.
Kavyakantha was a lofty man. Due to his intense penance, his kundalini rose, and, according to the scriptures, when the kundalini goes to the sahasra, the crown of the head, its power passes through the head and reaches the sun. Kavyakantha did not want this. Being Bhagavan?s disciple, he wanted the energy to go to the spiritual Heart. The phenomenon of the kundalini energy reaching the brain is called kapala bheda?kapala is the ―head‖ or ―skull‖ and bheda is ―to break.‖ This is the highest achievement in kundalini yoga. When the pain grew unbearable, he knew this was going to happen. He ran to Bhagavan, who placed his hand on his head. Kavyakantha said, ―The moment Bhagavan put his hand on my head, it was like cool moon rays raining down on me. The pain completely subsided.‖ Prior to this, some of Bhagavan?s other devotees reported to have seen a faint vapor-like substance rising from the top of his head.
My Teacher, T. K. Sundaresa Iyer, Kunju Swami, and Viswanatha Swami experienced another incident involving Bhagavan?s grace upon Nayana. At one time, while doing penance in a Ganesa temple in Tiruvotiyur, near Chennai, Kavyakantha felt he was unable to progress spiritually. He prayed to Bhagavan, ―Help me! Help me!‖ In response, he felt Bhagavan appearing before him, putting his hand on him, releasing him from his spiritual stagnation and then disappearing. Immediately Kavyakantha told his disciples about what happened. At the same time, Bhagavan at Skandashram collaborated, ―I was lying down, and all of a sudden, my body started floating. I heard the word ‗Tiruvotriyur? and walked in the main streets. I saw a Ganesa temple and entered it. Then, suddenly, I was back at Skandashram.
Then my Teacher, T. K. Sundaresa Iyer, asked, ―How did this happen, Bhagavan?Bhagavan replied, ―It is the sankalpa of Nayana. It was not my desire to go.‖ He continued, ―With this experience I also understood how Siddhas?the legendary sages and saints?would seem to travel in the astral realm. Perhaps it was the same for me. Still, it was not mine, but Kavyakantha?s desire made it transpire.‖
One day when Bhagavan was coming down the hill along with Nayana, Sundaresa Iyer, as well as some other devotees, he suddenly stopped and said, ―Nayana, look at me right now! The sun, moon, stars, and planets are revolving around my waist.‖ The onlookers could not see the spectacle but they did see Bhagavan?s body glowing with brilliance. Overawed, the devotees prostrated in front of the Master and chanted the sacred Purusha Suktham, a chant sung by ancient sages, praising the Lord of the Universe, where the sun and the moon are described as the two eyes of the Lord.
Bhagavan vouchsafed that after the kapala bheda and Tiruvotriyur experiences, an electric current, Shaktipat, had begun to pass through Kavyakantha's body. Therefore he could not walk barefoot on the earth without getting an electric shock. He began to wear wooden slippers but would reverently take them off in his Master's presence. Bhagavan would compassionately say, ―Nayana is coming. He cannot walk barefoot. Place a nonconductor, a wooden plank, for him to sit on. Give him also a woolen blanket that he can walk on without getting a shock.‖ We must respect Bhagavan's relationship with Kavyakantha. How the Master looked upon his disciples is more important than how a fellow disciple looked upon another. A sincere saint like Bhagavan admired Nayana, and that is all aspirants and devotees of Bhagavan should consider.

concluded.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2014, 04:10:55 PM by Ravi.N »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3998 on: December 07, 2014, 06:46:29 AM »
Dear Sri Ravi,

Quote:
"-for karma can be done in two ways-as kamya and nishkamya. Sri Sankara refers to the kamya karmas here. Nishkamya karma is not different than jnana and is an integral part of it. Karma is the effort aspect-and no one would say that without effort ignorance can be ended."


Ji. Yes. This is wonderful. When Sri Jamanalal Bajaj asked Sri Bhagwan whether desire for swaraj was right, Sri Bhagwan has replied that such desire begins, no doubt, with self-interest, yet the practical work for the goal gradually widens the outlook so that the individual becomes merged in the country. Sri Bhagwan taught that such merging of the individuality is desirable and the related karma was 'nishkama'.  So, dear bhai saheb, you have indeed brought it all beautifully. If one goes on to surrender the fruits of one's actions or works, and finally oneself,  in the course of one's work, to the Higher Power, that is, God or Guru, and never loses His Sight, Sri Bhagwan has taught that one will neither feel elated over nor even care for the result of one's actions.  THEN   CERTAINLY  KARMA  BECOMES  NISHKAMYA.  And that nishkamya karma certainly is not different from Jnana, as you said, and I have no doubt whatever that indeed nishkamya karma is its integral part or concomitant or coeval with Jnana.     


Quote:
" I can only say that Bhagavan's response only confirms Kavyakanta's wonderful insight. There was no confusion in what the muni has stated-The only confusion was in taking it as 'three paths'(separate) and not as a triune path."


Dear Sri Ravi, our great Sri Ganapati Muni interpreted the Verse as following:
"In the Heart's cavity, the sole Brahman as an ever-persisting 'I' shines direct in the form of the Self. Into the Heart enter thyself, with mind in search or in deeper plunge. Or by restraint  of life-movement be firmly poised in the Self."
Ramana Gita   

Dear bhai saheb, in my view, Sri Balarama Reddy perhaps understood  the three phrases, namely, 'with the mind in search', or in 'deeper plunge', or 'by restraint of life-movement' to mean that Sri Muni is referring here three separate paths to enter into Heart and be firmly poised in the Self. But, nevertheless, I feel that one need not lose one's calm over what Sri Reddy has said. You yourself have beautifully discerned the essential unity underlying the three paths, which I feel, is beautifully and adequately portrayed by your use of the word 'triune', three in one.  Ji. Yes, there is no separate path. Initially, for me, as well, these were different paths, but as my sadhana progressed, I gradually became aware of the essential unity. And my worship, japa, pranayama, et al culminate in Enquiry, voluntarily or involuntarily, for my only endeavour, in this life now, is to keep attention on the subjective awareness of 'myself',come what may come', and allow His Grace to take me where It will unobstructed. His Grace made me aware of the Goal--absorption in the Heart of being. This alone is now of paramount importance to me. Rest everything else is secondary.

Thanks very much, dear sir, for some very beautiful and meaningful posts.
Pranam,
  Anil


Note: Dear devotees, recently some very important works have been assigned to me by the Office (Sri Bhagwan's Will). I soon may have to go to Pune and Himachal Pradesh on official visit to the Water Resources Departments of the States. Therefore, I may not be able to attend and respond, in time, for some time, in the forum.  However, I shall keep attending and responding whenever I get some free time.  Anil 
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 06:53:14 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3999 on: December 07, 2014, 07:51:21 AM »
Anil bhai,

Quote
Initially, for me, as well, these were different paths, but as my sadhana progressed, I gradually became aware of the essential unity. And my worship, japa, pranayama, et al culminate in Enquiry, voluntarily or involuntarily, for my only endeavour, in this life now, is to keep attention on the subjective awareness of 'myself',come what may come', and allow His Grace to take me where It will unobstructed. His Grace made me aware of the Goal--absorption in the Heart of being. This alone is now of paramount importance to me. Rest everything else is secondary.

Yes,depending on the temperament,the initial approach may vary.Sri Bhagavan explains it in the Talks:

D.: How is restlessness removed from the mind?
M.: External contacts - contacts with objects other than itself - make the mind restless. Loss of interest in non-Self, (vairagya) is the first step. Then the habits of introspection and concentration follow. They are characterised by control of external senses, internal faculties, etc. (sama, dama, etc.) ending in samadhi (undistracted mind).
Talk 27.
D.: How are they practised?
M.: An examination of the ephemeral nature of external phenomena leads to vairagya. Hence enquiry (vichara) is the first and foremost step to be taken. When vichara continues automatically, it results in a contempt for wealth, fame, ease, pleasure, etc. The ?I? thought becomes clearer for inspection. The source of ?I? is the Heart - the final goal. If, however, the aspirant is not temperamentally suited to Vichara Marga (to the introspective analytical method), he must develop bhakti (devotion) to an ideal - may be God, Guru, humanity in general, ethical laws, or even the idea of beauty. When one of these takes possession of the individual, other attachments grow weaker, i.e., dispassion (vairagya) develops. Attachment for
the ideal simultaneously grows and finally holds the field. Thus ekagrata (concentration) grows simultaneously and imperceptibly - with or without visions and direct aids.
In the absence of enquiry and devotion, the natural sedative pranayama (breath regulation) may be tried. This is known as Yoga Marga. If life is imperilled the whole interest centres round
the one point, the saving of life. If the breath is held the mind cannot afford to (and does not) jump at its pets - external objects.
Thus there is rest for the mind so long as the breath is held. All attention being turned on breath or its regulation, other interests are lost. Again, passions are attended with irregular breathing, whereas calm and happiness are attended with slow and regular breathing. Paroxysm of joy is in fact as painful as one of pain, and both are accompanied by ruffled breaths. Real peace is happiness. Pleasures do not form happiness. The mind improves by practice and becomes finer just as the razor?s edge is sharpened by stropping. The mind is then better able to tackle internal or external problems. If an aspirant be unsuited temperamentally for the first two methods and circumstantially (on account of age) for the third method,
he must try the Karma Marga (doing good deeds, for example, social service). His nobler instincts become more evident and he derives impersonal pleasure. His smaller self is less assertive and has a chance of expanding its good side. The man becomes duly equipped for one of the three aforesaid paths. His intuition may also develop directly by this single method.

The upshot of the whole thing is to -Be Still and know that I am God.
Wishing you the best in your endeavours.In Pune,there is Hari Krishna Mandir-where Sri Dilip Kumar Roy lived his last days with his daughter disciple Indira Devi(the Mystic saint who had direct vision of mira Bai and has given us many songs).Himachal Pradesh is a wonderful place-we have the temple of Renukaji(consort of Maharishi Jamadagni and mother of Parasurama) and also Paonta sahib(the place where Guru Govind Singh spent 4 years and a gurudwara is built in memory).If time permits amidst your busy schedule,you may like to visit these places.

On 6th January, 1980 Dada Dilip Kumar Roy said to Ma Indira Devi, "Wash my hands, I have to touch the Lord's feet." The great minstrel saint reached the lotus feet of the Lord, at 3:40 PM.
http://www.harikrishnamandirindiraniloy.com/dadaji.htm

Dadaji loved Sri Bhagavan and has written many sweet poems and articles on Bhagavan.

Namaskar.

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #4000 on: December 07, 2014, 02:42:00 PM »
Quote:
"The upshot of the whole thing is to -Be Still and know that I am God."


Dear Sri Ravi,

You have summed up it all rather beautifully. The essence of the whole thing is to "Be Still and know that I am God". Thanks very much, Sir.

 Ji. Yes, I would like to visit Hari Krishna Mandir during my stay in Pune.  I would certainly like to visit the place where a great soul like Sri Dilip Kumar Roy lived his last days. I visited the site of the Mandir, on the address given by you, and found something there for myself. However, I had decided long ago that whenever I had the opportunity to visit Pune, I must visit Sant Sri Jnaneshwar's Samadhi in Alandi, near Pune. The great Sage has been in my consciousness from my childhood years, after I saw the wonderful Hindi movie 'Sant Jnaneshwar' when I was hardly ten years old. Our dear friend here, Sri Nagaraj ji, thanks to him, sent me the soft copy of Sri Jnaneshwar's beautiful Work 'Amritanubhav' through e-mail. And after reading His great Works, such as Jnaneshwari and Amritanubhav, I felt an urge from within to visit His Samadhi in Alandi. And now that opportunity has come of its own accord, I feel that I must visit His Samadhi and bask in His Presence for a while, while in Pune.

Pranam,
  Anil 

« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 02:44:37 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #4001 on: December 07, 2014, 04:01:49 PM »
     Your Questioning Eyes


Your questioning eyes are sad. They
seek to know my meaning as the moon
would fathom the sea.
I have bared my life before your
eyes from end to end, with nothing
hidden or held back. That is why you
know me not.
If it were only a gem, I could break
it into a hundred pieces and string
them into a chain to put on your neck.
If it were only a flower, round and
small and sweet, I could pluck it from
its stem to set it in your hair.
But it is a heart, my beloved.
Where are its shores and its bottom?
You know not the limits of this
kingdom, still you are its queen.
If it were only a moment of pleasure
it would flower in an easy smile, and
you could see it and read it in a
moment.
If it were merely a pain it would
melt in limpid tears, reflecting its
inmost secret without a word.
But it is love, my beloved.
Its pleasure and pain are boundless,
and endless its wants and wealth.
It is as near to you as your life, but
you can never wholly know it.

Sri Rabindranath Tagore



Ravi.N

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #4002 on: December 07, 2014, 04:31:13 PM »
Anil,

Quote
I would like to visit Hari Krishna Mandir during my stay in Pune.  I would certainly like to visit the place where a great soul like Sri Dilip Kumar Roy lived his last days. I visited the site of the Mandir, on the address given by you, and found something there for myself. However, I had decided long ago that whenever I had the opportunity to visit Pune, I must visit Sant Sri Jnaneshwar's Samadhi in Alandi, near Pune. The great Sage has been in my consciousness from my childhood years, after I saw the wonderful Hindi movie 'Sant Jnaneshwar' when I was hardly ten years old. Our dear friend here, Sri Nagaraj ji, thanks to him, sent me the soft copy of Sri Jnaneshwar's beautiful Work 'Amritanubhav' through e-mail. And after reading His great Works, such as Jnaneshwari and Amritanubhav, I felt an urge from within to visit His Samadhi in Alandi. And now that opportunity has come of its own accord, I feel that I must visit His Samadhi and bask in His Presence for a while, while in Pune
.

Yes indeed.The sant jnaneswar movie is a wonderful one and it is truly a blessings to visit the samadhi of this great sage and saint.Apparently we are assigned such official work but actually these are hidden blessings awaiting us that makes us visit places associated with the great ones.
Wishing you the very best.

Namaskar.

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #4003 on: December 08, 2014, 10:25:39 AM »
Quote:
"Apparently we are assigned such official work but actually these are hidden blessings awaiting us that makes us visit places associated with the great ones."

Dear Sir,

Ji, Yes Sir. This is how I have silently understood. This is an unexplicable Call for me  to Sage Sri Jnaneshwar's Abode. 

Thank you, sir. I have always looked toward you as my elder brother and benefitted immensely from your insights.

Pranam,
  Anil

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #4004 on: December 08, 2014, 10:47:22 AM »
               Unity
What is here is also there;
What is there, also here.
Who sees multiplicity but not
the indivisible Self in all
Wanders on and on from death to death.
- From the Hatha Upanisad