Author Topic: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough  (Read 758296 times)

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3930 on: October 27, 2014, 04:39:32 PM »
Dear Devotees,

Sri N. A. Mahan Rao contributes articles on the Self-enquiry regularly to the Ashram Journal, Mountain Path. A few years back, a very profound article named, 'Understanding Self-enquiry', authored by Sri Rao, was published in the Journal in three parts. As I reported earlier, I do not receive my copies of the same in time due to postal malpractices here, in Patna, though I am a lifetime member of the said Journal. During my visit to Sri Ramanasramam in 2013, I collected my copies in person and read the above mentioned article and was surprised at its profundity. My understanding of the Self-enquiry is almost similar to the one expressed in that wonderful article.  I wish to quote a few passages from the same as following:



Quote:

Of the different methods for Self-realization, Self-enquiry may be said to be drawing an ever-increasing attention in modern times. The directness of its logic and the simplicity of its practice, so assiduously brought home to us by Bhagavan Ramana, induce us to attempt it in preference to other established methods. A great many fortunate ones succeed in making it their sole sadhana.


However, it appears that many among the lay adherents to Self-enquiry do not have an adequate comprehension of the method. They find it difficult to fathom the exact manner of enquiring into the origin of the I-thought.  Some infer the right method correctly, but do not feel sure of it, as their experience does not seem to tally with what they read from books. So, they keep looking for alternatives instead of pursuing steadfastly the direct course that their intuition tells them is correct.
It is therefore advisable to obtain a proper understanding of the method before we start Self-enquiry. We will then realize that the practice puts us at once in sight of the 'distant' goal, much as a mountaineer obtains a glimpse of Mount Everest from afar through layers of mist and fog. There will be no more doubt as to our being on the right track, however long our practice may take for its fruition.
Mountain Path



Dear devotees, yes, Self-enquiry is a great and ultimate Quest which puts its practiser at once in sight of the only Goal of the human life, though it may or may not take long for its fruition, depending on the maturity of the seekers. However, one is assured of being
on the right track, because the Self-enquiry is its own light, and guides those who practice it as the Noth Star guides those on the sea voyage.

Thanks very much.
 Pranam,
  Anil 



   
« Last Edit: October 27, 2014, 04:42:03 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3931 on: October 29, 2014, 08:12:11 AM »
Dear Devotees,

The famous Chath Maha Vrata bagan yesterday in Bihar and will end tomorrow. The Maha Parva is observed with utmost purity for three days, and this is an occasion here in Bihar when everybody--- boy, girls, men, women and children, is filled with piety and seized with divine fervour you must see to believe. Every street, every road has been washed clean and there is no trace of dirt anywhere in Patna. Very melodious songs are composed and sung by local, folk musicians and singers, and are played all over continuously, till the end of the Maha Parva. This divine environment helps me  remain still  and thus 'keep to myself, without rising, with greater and greater clarity. The city of Patna has been decorated like a bride. I shall also be on the bank of the Divine River, Mother Ganga, today at the time of sunset in the evening, and tomorrow at the time of the sunrise in the morning, with other family members, friends and relatives. We all will pay obeisance and worship Divine Mother in the form of Cahthi Maiya, the Sun God, and the Mother Ganga. Almost entire population will be on the banks of the rivers, mostly on the bank of the Mother Ganga and some on the banks of the other rivers, tonight from 2.0 am onwards till sunrise. We will reach the Ganga Ghat at 2.0 am and meditate till sunrise, At sunrise, we will offer oblation (arga) and worship the Divine Mother and Sun God. Prasad and food will be shared and this marks end of the Maha Parva. I wonder how food becomes so delicious and tasty during Chath Vrata (Shashthi Vrata)! 

Thanks very much.
Pranam,
  Anil   
« Last Edit: October 29, 2014, 08:14:51 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3932 on: October 29, 2014, 08:34:15 AM »
Dear devotees, one very popular song which is played in every house and by TV Channels during Chath Vrata in Bihar is:

Chathi Maiya ! (Mother!), sun le arajiya (prayer) hammar (mine), O Chathi Maiya! darshan dee hin APPAR.
Cahthi Maiya ! Listen to my prayer, O Chathi Maiya ! Give me 'Darshan' of your Infinite Form!

Pranam,
  Anil

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3933 on: October 31, 2014, 07:02:31 AM »
Sri Sadhu Om  has written thus::

Therefore all yogas or sadhanas aim towards oneness (which is sometimes called 'union' with God or the reality), and one-pointedness of mind is their vehicle. Sadhana is a growth from desire to love, and self-love is the driving force behind this growth. The development of this growth towards love leads the aspirant to love just one God or one guru, which is the highest form of dualistic love, and the most effective aid to develop perfect self-love.
The guru shows the aspirant that the only means to achieve perfect self-love is self-attention. The aspirant therefore eagerly practises self-attention, but until his practice blossoms into true self-love, he continues clinging to his guru as the object of his love. His guru-bhakti is the stay and support that steadies and strengthens his growth towards self-love. This is the state that Bhagavan describes in verse 72 of Aksaramanamalai:

Arunachala, protect [me] as a support to cling to so that I may not droop down like a tender creeper without support.
The aspirant's love for and faith in his guru constantly drives him back to self-attention, which is the path taught by the guru, and as a result he comes to be increasingly convinced that his own self is the true form of his guru. Thus his dualistic guru-bhakti dissolves naturally and smoothly into non-dualistic svatma-bhakti (love for self alone), which is his true nature. One-pointed fidelity to the guru and his teachings is therefore an essential ingredient in sadhana, and it alone will yield the much longed for fruit of self-knowledge.
In Sri Arunachala Stuti Panchakam Bhagavan teaches us the true nature of guru-bhakti. For example:
Arunachala, when I took refuge in you as [my only] God, you completely annihilated me. (Aksaramanamalai verse 48)
... Is there any deficiency [or grievance] for me? . . . Do whatever you wish, my beloved, only give me ever-increasing love for your two feet. (Navamanimalai verse 7).......
What to say? Your will is my will, [and] that [alone] is happiness for me, lord of my life. (Patikam verse 2)

It is necessary to attempt to practise self-attention before one can possibly write commentaries on or translate Bhagavan's works. Only by repeatedly trying and failing can one begin to understand his teachings.
Source: Mountain Path



Dear Devotees,

I would like to say only a few words regarding Sri Om's insight that the aspirant's love for and faith in his Guru constantly drives him back to Self-attention. In fact, as I have gathered from reading devotees' works, it indeed has been the experience of countless number of His devotees. It is absolutely true. Our love for and faith in our Guru constantly keeps us in remembrance of His Name and Form, which is at once spontaneously dissolved in non-dual awareness or consciousness. Sri Bhagwan has taught that Self-consciousness is the only consciousness.  Sri Bhagwan is the Self abiding in the hearts of all.  Therefore, it follows naturally that our love for and faith in our Guru Bhagwan Sri Ramana enables us to always remember Him which effortlessly leads us to Self-attention, which, of course, is the ultimate sadhana, and thus, in my view, Sri Sadhu Om's insight stands vindicated and corroborated by His countless devotees.


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
  Anil



« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 07:17:30 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3934 on: October 31, 2014, 03:13:24 PM »
Dear devotees, Some time back I came across an article 'Reminiscences of Narkutti Swami'  in the Mountain Path. Sri Narkutti Swami is an Australian devotee who came to Tiruvannamalai in 1964 and lived there ever since. He lives in a house built on Sri Arunachala's Slope. I do not know anything about his present status. However, some of his views and replies to certain questions are indeed interesting and significant for Sri Bhagwan's devotees. So I wished to post some of them as following:

 
Let me try and get you to see this. The English poet Shakespeare said it when he wrote, 'To thine own self be true.' This is the same as the message from the old man to ask yourself 'Who am I.' There are two things written on the portals of the Temple of Adelphi in Greece, 'Know the Self ' and 'Nothing to excess.' Christ said that the kingdom of God is within. What could be more plain and simple than that? They are from different cultures and ages but essentially saying the same thing.


There is an old saying by the nineteenth century monk Vivekananda which says, 'It's a blessing to be born into a religion and a tragedy to die in one.' 'Let me go a bit further and amplify this. It's a privilege to leave one (religion) and discover your own self and find out what you are.'


Do you think India is a good place to do that?  Yes, but only because by being in India you are so overwhelmed by the plethora of religious thought that eventually you are forced to give up all beliefs and all sets of rules. It's unique.


It's more to do with the discipline of attending to the inner self. And not an outer set of rules. It's inner discipline, not an outer theory about the inside like therapy and religion. It's like riding a bike. You have to get on it and start pedalling. You can't sit on it and discuss it. You have to do it. You have to get going. You have to start having time to 'just be', to be your inner self.


It requires repeated daily work and this is probably the essence of the modern day true spiritual path. Perhaps this is why the more modern gurus of the last two hundred years have apparently seemed so popular in recent years.

If you don't ask about your life, or question yourself about how to lead it and you don't follow any religion, guru or therapist, you may appear to look happy. You may appear to be very fortunate and not be needy or vulnerable. But the truth is that we all know that this is not the case. Because as life progresses, it usually deals out a lot of pain. If you are wealthy and overprotected by wealth you are usually cut off from the inner self. That's what the Bible meant by saying that it is more difficult for a rich man to get to heaven than to get a camel through the eye of a needle. In India God is seen as being the inner self and this is actually what Christ meant when he said that the 'kingdom
of God is within'. They are different ways of saying the same thing. Preoccupation with wealth and what it brings distract you from your real neediness, from what you can be. It is all simple psychology. But Christ wasn't the first to say this. Five hundred years before him a prince Siddhartha Gautama gave up everything to find the inner self.


After some time in India you begin to notice that people who seem to be in search of enlightenment most commonly go in search of someone else to follow. They will look everywhere and repeatedly search out guru after guru, sometimes for years, but they won't look inside themselves and stick with that. It's the single most frustrating thing to observe in these people and after some time it can become an amusing thing as well. Any simple honest person would simply point a finger at them telling them to look inside themselves. The Inner guru rather like the inner physician is to be always trusted above everyone else. You know when you've got a good doctor or a bad one. The same can be said for the self. India is a good place to visit and explore this, but rather like a raft, it should only be used to cross a difficult river and not to actually live on. Once you get to the other side you have to discard it and walk away as there is no point in carrying a raft on your back on dry land. The same could be said for therapy. Sadly this is not seen by most people and they easily become slaves to their need for an external Guru or a therapist. I've spent years here seeing all sorts of people come and go trying to answer the same question, trying to find themselves. It really is simple and you just have to look within. You have to just be and get rid of the thoughts.


What happens as you get more in touch with the silent part, with the inner peace?
You eventually see that your worst enemy is thinking about it (peace) because thinking only leads to mental constipation. Thinking blocks your ability to just be. When you get through this, you can 'just be', and everything is just a dance in front of you.


Pranam,
  Anil
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 03:22:40 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3935 on: November 01, 2014, 06:31:29 AM »
Dear Devotees,

Sri Sadhu Om says that it is necessary to attempt to practise Self-attention before one can possibly write commentaries on or translate Bhagavan's works. It is because, in my view, one's understanding of Sri Bhagwan's Teaching goes on deepening as one practices His cardinal Teaching, that is, Self-attention. Therefore, yes, absolutely, it is the practice-oriented, straight and direct path, and therefore, only by repeatedly trying and failing, on the Path, can one begin to understand his Teachings. I myself feel, though I need not say it, that I certainly gained insight and understanding--transcending doubt as practice progressed unwaveringly.

Dear devotees, Sri Sadhu Om has gone on to support his observation with deep, insightful and forceful commentaries as following:


"Take for instance the first sentence of Ulladu Narpadu: 'Except what is, does consciousness that is exist?' To a mind that is unaccustomed to the practice of self-attention this will seem a very abstract idea, because the first word ulladu ('what is' or existence) will immediately suggest the existence of things, so such a mind will understand this sentence to mean, 'Unless things exist, can they be known?' But Bhagavan is always pointing to self, so by the word ulladu he means nothing other than 'I', which is the sole reality, that which alone actually exists.
However this will be immediately understood only by those who are well-soaked in the practice of self-attention. Such a person will understand this sentence to mean, "Other than what is (namely 'I'), can there be any consciousness of being (any awareness 'am)?" which they will understand as implying, 'My self-awareness (cit) is not other than my being (sat)'. It is so simple, but to ordinary people it seems abstract.
All scriptures and gurus aim at drawing our attention to ourselves, but as I said in the first part of The Path of Sri Ramana, up till now they have all started by conceding to our ignorant outlook of taking the ego to be real, and so they start their teaching from that perspective. But why not start from the source -- from what is actually real? Bhagavan was a revolutionary, so he never conceded that our viewpoint was correct, but instead always pointed directly to the one self-evident reality, 'I am'."
Source: Mountain Path



Dear devotees, things or objects do not exist, 'I' in everyone of 'us' alone exists. We erroneously, due to ignorance, superimpose our sense of existence that we all innately possess on to things and objects and the world. If we unwaveringly attend to the Self, with perseverance, we gradually understand that 'I' in everyone of us alone exists, and that our Self-consciousness is nothing other than our own Existence. Therefore, certainly, I also feel that for those who have not followed Sri Bhagwan's Way earnestly and practiced Self-attention, it will be difficult for such persons to make comment on or translate Sri Bhagwan's Works.  Such persons' comments, at best, will be only intellectual, which, I am certain, Sri Bhagwan's earnest devotees hardly need beyond a certain stage in their sadhana of the Atma-vichara.   And I have seen that when one attempted to translate Sri Bhagwan's Original Work, without walking the Path, one woefully fell short.


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
  Anil



« Last Edit: November 01, 2014, 06:40:50 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3936 on: November 01, 2014, 05:07:36 PM »
IN THE PARADISE OF THE HEART

By A Parsi Devotee


A very special type of vision, it is,
--Heart-vision.
But very very few are those who have it;
These are the few who
Dwell within the Heart,
And see with the eyes of the Heart.
Blind are they to all outer appearances;
Their attention always is
On the screen, and not on the picture
superimposed,
On the paper, and not on the writing
on it,
On the hidden Truth
Behind all phenomenal appearances.
'Sameness' is what they behold
everywhere,
One and the same Reality,
in all shapes and sizes,
Everyone and everything,
embodiment of T H A T,
The rose and the thorn, just the same.
If it's Freedom you seek,
If the Truth is what you aspire to,
If you wish to know things as they
really are,
Then, to the Heart, must you return.
And, when the lost Paradise of
the Heart,
You have regained,
When you are firmly anchored in
the Heart,
Your Spiritual Centre,
Then, will you find, that
There is nothing else except O N E,
There is neither 'this' nor 'that',
But just T H A T .


eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3937 on: November 01, 2014, 05:16:35 PM »
One evening a young French visited Sri Bhagavan in the Jubilee pundal.  The young man put a question: "Which book is the best guide to Truth?" Sri Bhagavan replied: "All scriptures declare that Truth is within yourself, that in fact you are That then how can you find Truth in books that are without (outside) yourself? Your searching for Truth in books is like the light seeking itself in the shadow."

Ramana Reminiscences, Sri G.V. Subbramayya


Self seeking Itself in anatma vastu or the not-Self is indeed akin to light seeking itself in the shadow. Anil

« Last Edit: November 01, 2014, 05:22:18 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3938 on: November 02, 2014, 09:29:04 AM »
Dr. Sri S. Radhakrishnan:

"Perfection at the human level is a task to be accomplished by
conscious behaviour. The image of God operating in us produces a
sense of insufficiency. Man has a haunting sense of the vanity, the
transience and the precariousness of all human happiness. Those who
live on the surface of life may not feel the distress, the laceration of
the spirit, and may not feel any urge to seek their own good. They are
purushapasu (human animals)...... But those who realize their dignity
as human beings are acutely aware of the discord and seek a principle
of harmony and peace."




Dear Devotees,


Even if Life has treated some of us rather well, we still are haunted by the sense of inadequacy, we all therefore are haunted by the transience and the precariousness of our worldly existence and all our worldly happiness, irrespective of our predicament. Are we not? Our desire to be free and be happy permanently is innate. It cannot be otherwise since It is the Inner Guru who produces the sense of insufficiency so that we may desire and seek sufficiency. Self is the eternal Peace and Harmony which abides as the Heart within everyone of us. Hence, Sri Vivekananda declared, that too from U.S.A., that goal of human life is to seek this divinity within and get established for ever in eternal Peace and Harmony and be free. All other goals are transitory and therefore unreal like mirage.  We need to imperatively and urgently investigate and find out who we really are.  Grace is operating, and sooner or later we all have to find That which abides within all, and which alone is real.


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
  Anil
« Last Edit: November 02, 2014, 09:41:02 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3939 on: November 02, 2014, 02:00:05 PM »
Sri Sadhu Om:

Such manana [cogitation or deep reflection] is essential until you understand thoroughly that self-attention is natural and eternal and that all else shines by the light of that self-awareness. This manana will lead you right up to the boundary. Nididhyasana [contemplation, the practice of pure self-attention] is actually only for a moment. When you really practise what you have heard and understood, you cross the boundary, and that is jnana.                     

Ignore the mind, it needn't concern us. We are not the mind, so when we lose interest in it, it will die a natural death. This is why Bhagavan is always drawing our attention to self. He never allows us to become interested in the thinking mind or anything other than the feeling 'I'.

'What is this 'I'? What is the source from which it appears?' All that is required is that our interest in this feeling 'I' should increase. That is bhakti.

Enquiry, faith and bhakti are not contradictory. They are all necessary. Enquiry begins with faith. Unless we have faith in the guru who tells us that self-attention is the means to true happiness, we would not be interested in attending to the first person. And when we practise self-attention, our experience of inner clarity confirms our faith, and thus our love for the guru increases. Some people think that they can practise self-enquiry, so they do not need faith or bhakti. Such people know neither what bhakti nor what enquiry actually is.

The purpose of the outer guru is to make us understand the need for self-attention and to enkindle love for it in our heart. A living person is of course not needed for that. Bhagavan's books serve the same purpose, and he provides us with fellow devotees and other outer aids as and when necessary. The environment or circumstances in which we live are provided by the guru, who knows what the most suitable environment is for maturing us. When we start trying to attend to the first person, the guru within, who is self, will start working. Whenever we attend to 'I', the guru's work is going on. Once we have been given a taste for self-attention, our love for it naturally increases and matures, like the momentum of a rubber ball as it bounces down a flight of stairs.

To think of the real greatness of a jnani is a good means to quieten the mind. When Arjuna's grandson, King Parikshit, was cursed that he would die in seven days, he went to his guru, Suka Brahmarishi. Suka told him that he was fortunate, because he was assured seven days, and then he started to tell him the story of Krishna. Parikshit was so absorbed in hearing the greatness of Krishna that six days passed by unnoticed, and when Suka reminded him that he would die that day, he replied, 'Who will die, only this body!' Hearing about Krishna had given him jnana. Sometimes, when I used to think of Bhagavan and his real greatness, hours would pass without my noticing them. Great jnanis are such that even thinking of them can quieten our mind.

Once we have wholeheartedly taken Bhagavan to be our guru, we have no need to worry: we are like the child in its mother's lap. Of course, we cannot expect Bhagavan to choose us as his disciples, because in his view there are no others, so it is for us to decide that he is our only guru and protector. Once we have wholeheartedly decided this, then we are truly having association or satsanga with him. This is really the satsanga that he refers to in the first five verses of Ulladu Narpadu Anubandham. Once we enjoy this satsanga, he will be working from within and without. From outside he will shape our physical circumstances suitably, and from inside he will work deep within our cittam, where he will root out our vasanas by burning, drying, churning out or dealing with them in whatever other way is most  appropriate. We may not see any changes, of course, because the mind is not a suitable instrument for gauging its own development. The influence of his silence is of course dependent upon [the receptivity of ] us, the receiver set. As he says in Nan Yar? (Who am I?), we must unfailingly follow the path shown by the guru. We must be sincere in our love for him. He says that he is self-shining in each one of us as 'I', so if we really love him, we will naturally and happily attend to this 'I'. When we are thus in his hands, he will make us do whatever is necessary. When we should attend to self, he will make us do so, and when we need some other experiences, he will provide them also.

If Bhagavan was truly a fit guru (our real self ) when he was appearing as a body, then he must also be a fit guru now. But then he was with all his (Brahman's) five aspects, sat-cit-ananda-nama-rupa [being-consciousness-bliss and name-and-form], whereas he is now
without nama-rupa, his false aspects, and hence he shines unimpeded  as pure sat-cit-ananda. Therefore his power is now infinite. He always used to say that his body was veiling his true nature, and that those that took that body to be guru would be disappointed. Now his body has gone, he has left us with no outward form to cling to, so we have no alternative but to accept that 'I am' alone is the guru. I have found that many disciples who have come to him after the passing of his body are more sincere and have clearer understanding than most of those who came earlier [because they were fixated just on his physical form]. He now saves us from mistaking him to be the body, so what advantage would we gain from going to other bodies who are reputed to be great mahatmas? He has said that the greatest mahatma is within, so why not forget those other mahatmas and abide peacefully as this mahatma (our real self )?



Pranam,
  Ani
« Last Edit: November 02, 2014, 02:06:53 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3940 on: November 02, 2014, 06:10:26 PM »
Dear devotees, Sri Adi Shankarcharya was an Advaitin extraordinaire. Was He not? Well, He composed following song in praise of the Goddess Mother, Ganga::


O Devi Sureswari! O Bhagvati Ganga!
Saviour of the three worlds of restless waves,
Clear is thy water circling upon the head of Shiva,
May my mind ever repose at thy lotus feet.
O Ganga! sprung from the feet of Vishnu,
Whose waves are white as snow, as moon, as pearl,
Remove from me my weight of sin,
Help me to cross the ocean of the world.
They say that him, 0 Ganga! who is devoted to thee,
Yama can never behold.
He who has drunk of thy clear water
Attains of a surety the supreme abode.
He who bathes in thy current, O Mother!
Is never again reborn in woman's womb.
0 Protectress from hell! 0 Jahnavi! O Ganga!
O Destructress of sins! Lofty art thou by thy greatness.
O Bhagirathi! dispel my illness, my melancholy and pain,
As also my sins and all my follies.
Essence of the three regions, necklace of Earth,
Of a surety thou art my refuge in the world.


Pranam,
  Anil


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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3941 on: November 04, 2014, 02:53:29 PM »
Sri Sadhu Om:

A mantra is a set of sacred syllables, and the word literally means 'that which protects when meditated on, coming from the same root as manas (mind) and manana (meditation or cogitation)'. Who is to be protected? The ego! A name of God will at least lead us to God, but a mantra will only protect us (our ego, mind or individuality) from God. There has been so much talk in India about mantras that nowadays people are not satisfied unless they are given a mantra.

However, mantras are only for worldly things, so Bhagavan and Ramakrishna never initiated anyone with mantras. Bhagavan's instruction concerning mantra-japa was that we should watch the source from which the sound of the mantra rises. What did he mean? Since the sound rises only from oneself, who repeats the mantra, he meant that we should ignore the mantra and instead cling fast to self-attention.



In Nan Yar? Bhagavan says, '... when the body dies, the mind seizes and takes the prana away'. This simply means that when the mind subsides into its source, the tendency or habit of breathing also subsides. Then as soon as the mind rises again, projecting a new body,the function of breathing restarts automatically and immediately. Whenever there is body-consciousness, there is breathing. Breathing is an ingrained habit of the mind, and if we try to see how breathing starts, the mind subsides.
Source: Mountain Path.





Dear Devotees,


These clues are invaluable for those who practice Sri Bhagwan's Atma-vichara. What is the Source of the sound of the Mantra. It is oneself.  So, when one watches keenly, with one-pointed concentration,  where from the sound of mantra is emanating, one intuitively understands that it is emanating from oneself and thus one attends to the Self, which is nothing but the Self-attention, Sri Sadhu Om speaks of. Similarly, if we keenly watch where from the breathing is arising, the mind subsides, because both arise from the same Source, that is, only oneself. Hence, even watching the Source of breath will spontaneously lead one to attending the Self or to the Self-attention. 


Dear devotees, it is obvious that all the clues Sri Bhagwan gave pointed to the Self, and which invariably reminded us of our own being. Even what does Sri Ramanasramam do to us when we are really soaked in Its divine ambience? There is something inexplicable in the Old Hall, Samadhi Hall, etc., that effortlessly reminds us of our own being. So, what is available in Sri Ramanasrama, automatically and effortlessly, we reach in our places with effort. However, the Self is ever realised and therefore effort is unnecessary for the Self.  It is the nature of the Self to attend the Self, and it is the nature of the mind to attend to second or third presons objects and thoughts.. So, Self-attention is natural and always going on even if  we are not aware.  Sadhana is only for the mind, and the effort to attend to the feeling 'I' is only to keep the mind quiet-- in its natural state of pure self-awareness.

It follows therefore that the effort is required only so long as the mind needs to be reminded of its true nature as the consciousness or as the Self or as 'I am'.  But when the enquiry reaches a state when even awareness of second or third persons leads one to one's own state of being, that is, oneself, automatically and spontaneously, that is, without efforts, then, obviously, effort is no longer needed, and one has sure reached the state of effortlessness. Such a one now knows intuitively, at all times, that, in truth, what is aware of them all, as the second and third persons, is one's own true 'I'.   AND  THAT  WHEN  WE  BECOME  AWARE  OF  ANYTHING  WHATEVER,  WE  ESSENTIALLY  ARE  AWARE  OF  'OURSELVES'  ONLY.


Thanks very much.
Pranam,
  Anil
 
« Last Edit: November 04, 2014, 04:19:37 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3942 on: November 04, 2014, 03:34:12 PM »
Dear devotees, what follows is a wonderful conversation of Sri Sai Baba of  Shirdi with one of His devotees on Guru giving ignorance to root out His devotees' ignorance:


Sri Baba: Isn't Brahma pure Knowledge or Being?
Devotee: Yes.
 
Sri Baba: And everything else non-Being or ignorance
[non-Knowledge]?

D: Yes.

Sri Baba: Don't the scriptures declare that Brahma is
beyond the range of speech or mind?
 
D: Yes.

Sri Baba: Then the speech of the Guru is not Brahma
or Knowledge?

D: No.

Sri Baba: Then you admit that what the Guru says is
not Knowledge but ignorance??

D: It seems so.

Sri Baba: Then the Guru's instruction is simply a piece
of ignorance used to remove the disciple's ignorance,
just as we use a thorn to remove another
thorn from the foot, isn't it?.

D: I suppose so.

Sri Baba: The disciple is a jiva [being] whose essential
nature is Knowledge, isn't he?

D: Yes.

Sri Baba: Then there is obviously no need to give him Knowledge but simply to remove the veil of ignorance that hides the existent Knowledge. This, of course, is not to be done at one stroke since the disciple is immersed in age-old ignorance and needs repeated instruction perhaps through life after life. And what is the nature of this instruction through speech about what is beyond speech? Isn't it like removing a cover? Ignorance conceals the pre-existent Knowledge just as water-plants cover over the surface of a pond. Clear away the plants and you have the water. You don't have to create it; it is there already. Or take another example - a cataract grows on the eye and prevents a man from seeing; remove the cataract and he sees. Ignorance is the cataract. The universe is the efflorescence of the indescribable Maya, which is ignorance; yet ignorance is needed to illuminate and dissolve this ignorance. Divine Knowledge is to be realized, not taught. Prostration, enquiry and service are the methods by which to obtain the Grace of the Guru. It is an illusion to suppose that phenomena are real. That is the screen of ignorance which hides Knowledge. Tear it off and Brahma or Knowledge will shine forth. Ignorance is the seed of samsara [birth and death]. Put the medicine of the Guru's Grace on the eye and the screen of Maya lifts, leaving only Jnana [Knowledge]. Jnana is not something to be attained, it is eternal and self-existent. On the other hand, ignorance has a cause and an end. The root of it is the idea that the devotee is a separate being from God. Remove this and what remains is Jnana.


Pranam,
  Anil
« Last Edit: November 04, 2014, 03:47:03 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3943 on: November 05, 2014, 05:06:19 PM »
Vachana of  Sri Akkamahadevi:

Vachana Two:
You seek within yourself; it's not elsewhere O brother,
Consciousness is within yourself
Without meditating on something else,
if one could be aware within oneself,
The awareness within oneself is Guheshwara Linga.



Vachana Three:
What is the use of knowing everything?
Unless one knows oneself!
When knowledge is within oneself, why ask others?
Chennamallikarjuna, since you shone as Knowledge,
I had the knowledge of You through You, O Lord!



Sri Bhagwan to Sri Paul Brunton: What is the use of knowing about everything else when you do not yet know who you are? Men avoid this enquiry into the true Self, but what else is there so worthy to be undertaken?
« Last Edit: November 05, 2014, 05:07:51 PM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #3944 on: November 05, 2014, 06:06:32 PM »
268. Death happens in a split second. Awakening from sleep happens in a split second. Similarly, the destruction of the delusion of individuality happens in just a split second. True knowledge is not something that can be gained and then lost. If a person feels that true knowledge is coming and going, he is still only in the state of practice (or abhyasa). It cannot be said that such a person has attained true Self-knowledge.



The perfect awakening into the state of Self-knowledge happens in just a split second. That state is not attained gradually over a long period of time. All the sadhanas that are practiced over a period of many years are meant only for attaining blemishless maturity. Listen to an apt illustration. After people have placed gunpowder in the iron barrel of a temple-cannon, after they have added bro-ken pieces of brick, after they have packed it tight with a ramrod, after they have placed a wick in contact with the powder, and after they have plastered the open end of the barrel with clay, as soon as the charge is ignited it will explode in a split second with a blast that sounds like thunder.

Similarly, after one has learnt the truth about the real Self through hearing and reading, after one has practiced sadhana for a long time, after one has wept and prayed with heart-melting devotion, and after one has thereby attained purity of mind, the knowledge of the reality will instantaneously shine forth in a split second as 'I am I'. As soon as the dawn of Self-knowledge thus takes place, due to the clear shining of the reality of this state, which is an empty space devoid of objective knowledge, will be spontaneously realized to be the state of true knowledge, which is our beginningless real nature. When even the effort of attending to Self thereby merges in Silence, that state of mere Being, in which there is nothing further to do and nothing further to attain at any time, alone is the real state.
The Essence of Spiritual Practice
(Sadhanai Saram)
« Last Edit: November 05, 2014, 06:08:06 PM by eranilkumarsinha »