Author Topic: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough  (Read 757686 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1260 on: August 08, 2011, 12:22:09 PM »


Dear Anil,

Sri Bhagavan has said that efforts are necessary only in the beginning,
to ward off the thoughts and bring the mind inturned. Thereafter, it is an
effortless path to attain the Self.

Sri Bhagavan says in Verse 3 of Atma Vidya Kirtanam:

The thought 'I am the body' is the thread
On which are strung together various thoughts.
Questing within enquiring "Who am I?
And whence this thought?" all other thoughts
Vanish. And as I, I, within the Heart Cave
The Self shines of its own accord
Such self awareness is the only Heaven,
This is Stillness, this is the Abode of Bliss.



Arunachala Siva.

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1261 on: August 08, 2011, 02:56:07 PM »
Dear Anil,

Sri Bhagavan has said that efforts are necessary only in the beginning,
to ward off the thoughts and bring the mind inturned. Thereafter, it is an
effortless path to attain the Self.

Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

Ji. Yes, this is exactly as I have understood and what I wished to say in my last two posts. So long as the mind is externalised and thoughts are distracting from the enquiry, efforts are necessary. Sri Bhagwan says that mind’s attachment to non-Self makes it wander about. The mind should be withdrawn from the non-Self and fixed in the Self-enquiry. However, when mind becomes one-pointed and is in-turned, effort can neither be put in, nor it is desirable, for, then effort would be counterproductive. At this level, it is mere B-e-i-n-g all along and any effort here would only swerve one away from this state.
D : In my meditation I try to eliminate the wrong ‘I’, but so far without success.
Sri Bhagwan : How can ‘I’ eliminate itself ? ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS TO FIND ITS SOURCE AND ABIDE IN IT AS YOUR REAL SELF. YOUR EFFORT CAN EXTEND THUS FAR, THE BEYOND WILL TAKE CARE OF ITSELF.
                                          P. 77, Guru Ramana

Dear sir, I feel that the above statement, recorded by Sri S. S. Cohen, clears all the ambiguities, if someone feels there is any, with regard to effort and effortlessness in the sadhana of the Self-enquiry. ‘All you have to do is to find its source and abide in it as your real Self, effort can extend thus far only’. When one is here, BEYOND will itself take care from hereafter till one is HOME.

I do not feel that there is any point of disagreement here. 

Thank you so much, sir.

Regards,
  Anil         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1262 on: August 08, 2011, 04:47:44 PM »


Dear Anil,

There are two wonderful verses in Guru Stuti, which Sri Bhagavan has
translated from original Sri Sankra:

2. That is the Truth, which, after generating the fundamentals [five elements]
and entering the world, lies hidden beneath the five sheaths, and
which has been threshed out by the wise with pestle of discernment,
just as the grain is recovered by threshing and winnowing the chaff.
That Thou art.

3. Just as wild horses are broken-in by whipping and stabling them,
so also the unruly senses, straying among objects, are lashed by the
whip of discrimination, showing that objects are unreal, and are tethered
by the rope of pure intellect to the Self by the wise. Such is the Truth.
That Thou art.

These two verses, use the word discrimination, to denote the efforts needed.



Arunachala Siva. 

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1263 on: August 09, 2011, 09:08:45 AM »
“There are two wonderful verses in Guru Stuti, which Sri Bhagavan has
translated from original Sri Sankra:

2. That is the Truth, which, after generating the fundamentals [five elements]
and entering the world, lies hidden beneath the five sheaths, and
which has been threshed out by the wise with pestle of discernment,
just as the grain is recovered by threshing and winnowing the chaff.
That Thou art.

3. Just as wild horses are broken-in by whipping and stabling them,
so also the unruly senses, straying among objects, are lashed by the
whip of discrimination, showing that objects are unreal, and are tethered
by the rope of pure intellect to the Self by the wise. Such is the Truth.
That Thou art.

These two verses, use the word discrimination, to denote the efforts needed.”
Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

Ji. Yes, Verses of the Guru Stuti are wonderful and very subtle; and blend with Sri Bhagwan’s own Teaching in rather an effective way.  Adi Guru, Sri Sankara has also given a wonderful definition of the discrimination which is world famous. ‘The knowledge, that Brahm is satyam and jagat is mithyam, is discrimination !’
 That is the Truth which the valiant have got by seeking, with controlled mind, with abstinence, penance, etc., and by diving into the Self by the self. Realising it, they are considered to be heroes, with their highest purpose accomplished. That is the transcendental Satchdananda ( Being-Consciousness-Bliss) after gaining which  there is nothing more to worry about, sinceperfect peace reigns. That thou art !
             V. 8, Guru Stuti, Source : The Collected Works Of Sri ramana Maharshi

Dear sir, ‘….by diving into the Self by the self’ is worth note.
The Hymn ‘Guru Stuti’ is regarded as having sung by the disciples of the Adi Guru when He was sporting in the body of the King Amaruka among the hundreds of queens of the King to learn ‘erotica’ to defeat Sri Mandana Mishra’s wife in the debate. I should mention here that at present I am posted in the same region where Sri Manadana Mishra lived. People say here that even his parrots conversed in Sanskrit !

Thank you so much, sir.

Regards,
  Anil 



eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1264 on: August 09, 2011, 09:11:11 AM »
Devotee : It is difficult to follow. I understand the theory. But what is the practice?
Sri Bhagwan : The other methods are meant for those who cannot tale to the investigation of the Self. Even to repeat ‘aham Brhamasmi’ or think of it, a doer is necessary. Who is it ? IT IS ‘I’. BE THAT ‘I’. IT IS THE DIRECT METHOD. The other methods also will ultimately lead everyone to this method of the investigation of the Self.
                                                            P. 73, Be As You Are

Dear Devotees,

Besides, the book ‘Be As You Are’ mentions that Sri Bhagwan once remarked :

Sri Bhagwan :
Do not meditate –be !
Do not think that you are—be !
Don’t think about being—You are !’
There is one who is the doer of sadhana in any path. And it is always ‘I’.  Sri Bhagwan says , “Be that ‘I’. It is the Direct Method.” In ‘Who am I ?’enquiry, one concentrates within oneself where the ‘I’-thought, the root of all other thoughts arises. Self is within and not outside of ourselves. Therefore, the one whose mind is out-turned, is even asked to dive within. Sri Bhagwan says that nothing can be easier than going to oneself. Yet, to some the method appears difficult and does not appeal to them. Therefore, other methods are also taught depending on the ‘pakva’ ( maturity) or fitness of the devotees, each method appealing most and appearing easiest and the best to some. But to some, however, only path of Self-enquiry appeals most and appears easiest and the best.

Therefore, Sri Bhagwan says that whatever method is chosen, there will always be a doer. The doer ‘I’ is inescapable. So, whatever method is taken up, eventually all have to come to the Enquiry ‘Who am I ?’ for the Self-Knowledge, FOR KNOWING THAT VERY TRUE ‘I’.

When some devotees of Sri Bhagwan complained that in this system there is nothing preliminary and positive to start with, Sri Bhagwan replies that one knows that one exists even without the body, for example in sleep. On waking we identify the Self with the body and are confounded, but all the same, say, “I slept happily’. ‘I’ is inescapable. Sri Bhagwan says , “Be that ‘I’ ” THEREFORE, ON THE PATH TAUGHT BY SRI BHAWAN, THAT INESCAPABLE  ’I’ IS THE MOST PRELIMINARY AND MOST POSITIVE ENTIYY TO START WITH.
It is strange, indeed, that we are so out-turned that things outside of us, which are foreign to us, appeal and appears interesting; and that which is the real Dhama, our Permanent Abode and Source of all that is, appears difficult to attend.   

Thank you,
   Anil         

   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1265 on: August 09, 2011, 02:57:18 PM »


Dear Anil,

Yes. All other methods like japa, dhyana, nityakarma etc., are only
for chittasuddhi. But self inquiry will not only confer self abidance
but will first ensure chittasuddhi itself.



Arunachala Siva.

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1266 on: August 10, 2011, 08:26:48 AM »
“Yes. All other methods like japa, dhyana, nityakarma etc., are only
for chittasuddhi. But self inquiry will not only confer self abidance
but will first ensure chittasuddhi itself.”

Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

Very well said, sir, indeed. This comment of yours, on the Self-enquiry, gladdened my heart ! Thank you so much, sir.

Karshani said : If there is a way other than Self-enquiry for salvation, Is it one or many ? Sri Bhagwan may kindly explain.
                                                V. 7-21, Sri Ramana Gita

Sri Bhagwan : One strives to attain; the other reaches the attained. The first one traverses for long and finally attains the Self.
                                                  V. 7-22, Sri ramana Gita

Therefore, liberation can be had by both the Path of Meditation as well as by the Direct Path of Self-enquiry, of course, with this difference that in the first, one strives, traverses for long and then finally attains the Self, but in the second, one reaches the attained.

What does the above Teaching mean ?

In the Path of Meditation, there is a subject-object division. There is a duality implied and mental activity is not unitary. There is one who meditates on the object of meditation. There is a attainer and a thing to be attained. But in the Path of self-enquiry, such mental dichotomy is non-existent. Self-enquiry is the Self-attention either in the form of ‘Who am I ?’ or in the form of ‘Whence am I ?’ ‘I’-thought merges in the Source which is one’s True Self. So, Sri Bhagwan says that in this Path, one reaches the attained. The Self is ever-attained. Therefore, in the Direct Path, one seeks the Source of his self and merges in That which is ever-attained, ever-realised and shines forth as the Swarupa Itself.

However, in the next verse Sri Bhagwan says that in the Path of Meditation, one-pointedness is  achieved. The mind acquires a single from by meditation and one form of the mind easily merges in one’s Swarupa, which is one’s True Form. But this journey is a long and arduous one.

Sri Bhagwan : For the one, the mind becomes of one form through meditation. And the one form of the mind contributes to its stationing in one’s true form.
                                                                 V. 7-23, Sri Ramana Gita

Sri Bhagwan says that when the mind becomes of one form or one-pointed, one gets stationed in the Self, whether he desires it or not. HOWEVER, IN THE ENQUIRY, ENQUIRER IS STATIONED IN THE SELF WITH KNOWLEDGE.

Regards,
   Anil   

           

                                                      

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1267 on: August 10, 2011, 08:41:07 AM »
Dear Devotees,

This post is devoted to ‘Guru Kataksham’ which is the ‘Grace of the Guru’ that leads to Self-Realisation. Guru Kataksham is said to be akin to a wild elephant seeing a lion in its dream. When an elephant sees a lion in its dream, terror-stricken, it wakes up all of a sudden startled. It won’t sleep that day for fear that the lion might appear again in the dream.
Our empirical life is also a dream. Sri Bhagwan says in the ‘Letters from Sri Ramanasramama’ that sravana, manana, and nididhyasana are also akin to the sight of a lion in a dream. These dreams of sravana, manana and nididhyasana wake us up. Sri Bhagwan says that in this way they may some day get a lion’s dream called Guru Kataksham in an intense manner. Then we wakeup startled. ‘Waking up startled’ here means that we wake up from the ‘sleep of ignorance’ and finally we attain Realisation. As the elephant does not sleep after seeing a lion in its dream, the one who is awakened by the Guru Kataksham from the ‘sleep of ignorance’ will remain wakeful all the time and there will be no more dreams for him. Even if he does not attain Jnana immediately after intense Guru Kataksham, he will remain alert till True jnana is attained, till one is established in the All Encompassing Swarupa.

Devotee : Are sravana etc. and Guru Kataksham akin to dreams ?
Sri Bhagwan : Yes, that is so. For those who realise the truth, everything is akin to a dream.

We exist always, in the states of waking, sleep and dream. If we become aware of that True Existence, Sri Bhagwan says that we will understand that we are not different from the Guru. But then, since Self-Realisation must come about because of Guru Kataksha, that Guru Kataksha is also likened to a dream of a lion. Sri Bhagwan says that dream must be so intense that it should leave its imprint in the mind. Only then a proper wakefulness comes about.

 But for that, time must be propitious. Sri Bhagwan says that if sadhana is performed relentlessly, sometime or the other favourable results turn up. That is all.
                                                        Source: Letters from sri Ramanasramam

Thank you,
  Anil 

   
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1268 on: August 10, 2011, 09:39:45 AM »


Dear Anil,

Guru Kataksham is the focused gaze of Guru on the devotee. 
Sri Bhagavan's gaze has made many people lose their mind,
though temporarily in many cases and permanently in some
cases, and have made such devotees'  self realization is easier.
It is compared to the look of a lion in a dream by an elephant

Once there was one official from Pondicherry who came to have
darshan of Sri Bhagavan.  He was arrogant and spoke only in
French [in the times of French rule of Pondicherry] and had brought
a long list of questions.  Sri N. Balarama Reddy, who knew French,
because he was with Sri Aurobindo for sometime in Pondicherry,
translated the questions to Sri Bhagavan.  The French visitor stylishly
sat on the window sill near Sri Bhagavan.  Atter a pause of several
minutes, Sri Bhagavan gazed at him, intently for a minute or so.

The French visitor started sweating, became visibly nervous and
started crying, "Not now, Not now, Not now, Sri Bhagavan."   Then
Sri Bhagavan turned to the other side without looking at him.  The
French visitor did not want to lose the ego by the gaze of Sri Bhagavan.
Perhaps that was his destiny.  So he literally cried "not now, not now".
It is exactly the like roaring of the elephant in the dream, after seeing the
Lion in the dream.

Guru Kataksham works positively with devotees who are ready to
lose their ego.  For others, it produces fear of losing the ego.

       

Arunachala Siva.

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1269 on: August 10, 2011, 05:23:11 PM »
Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

Ji. Yes. Thank you so much for a very nice post. I read the episode of the arrogant French official from Pondichery in one of Dr. Sarada’s books. The officer is said to have carried a list of questions at the end of which he wrote that he didn’t want any intellectual discussion but the actual experience. The book mentions that after reading the questions and the statement, Sri Bhagwan turned His Full Gaze on him. The officer became nervous and exclaimed, “ No! Not now ! Not now ! I shall come later!” Yes, ego is still dear.
 In which book the full account of this episode has been given ?

Dear sir, one more clarification I wish to seek from you. You have mentioned in your post that the Guru Kataksham is the Focussed Gaze of the Guru on the devotee. Do you mean only Gaze from the physical eyes which was available to devotees before His ‘Maha Samadh’.  I do not feel so.  I understand that certainly It is still available. Will you kindly like to explain this aspect of the Guru Katksham ?   

    Regrds,
     Anil

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1270 on: August 10, 2011, 06:07:57 PM »


Dear Anil,

The episode about the Pondycherry officer is available in detail in
Sri N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.  The book is available in
the Asramam book depot.

Guru Kataksham during Sri Bhagavan's times was available whenever
He chose to gaze at a particular devotee intently. Such a gaze will melt
the ego of the devotee. Wolter Kier explains this quite beautifully in
David Godman's the Power of the Presence.

This kataksham is also available for people who look at Sri
Ramaneswara Mahalingam in the Samadhi Hall or even a photograph
of Sri Bhagavan at home. Particularly the Welling Bust photo and Sri
Bhagavan's photo, which was taken at the age of 21 [this is the first
photograph of Sri Bhagavan] are powerful tools to obtain the gaze of
Sri Bhagavan.



Arunachala Siva.
 
that is at home   

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1271 on: August 11, 2011, 10:48:03 AM »
This kataksham is also available for people who look at Sri
Ramaneswara Mahalingam in the Samadhi Hall or even a photograph
of Sri Bhagavan at home. Particularly the Welling Bust photo and Sri
Bhagavan's photo, which was taken at the age of 21 [this is the first
photograph of Sri Bhagavan] are powerful tools to obtain the gaze of
Sri Bhagavan.

Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

Ji. Yes. Thank you for a very nice post, sir. Sri Wolter A Keers was certainly a ripe soul, a pakva, or a dheera, as Sri Bhagwan Himself used to say of such devotees. Sri Keers was born into a family of clergymen and he himself says that it was clear as crystal that he brought a large amount of spiritual samskaras into this life.

He says that when he sat in Sri Bhagwan’s Presence, he felt a quiet lucidity. All thoughts would be swept away, burnt in the raging fire of His Potent Presence. But after a few hours of being alone in his room, he would realise that these states were only temporary and old thpughts and problems would eventually rise rise up again. Therefore he was not content with this experience, for he had come to Sri Bhagwan to seek a permanent end to his mind and all the problems created by it. So, he says that he stubbornly refused the blessing of mere mental quietness and refused to melt into Sri Bhagwan’s radiance.
He says:
“He sat down among the crowded hall and wanted to see what would happen. Bhagwan paid no attention to me at all, or at least none that I was aware of, but experience had taught me that he was aware of every mood and mind state in the hall. He beamed radiantly at all the new visitors, occasionally rubbed his head, and when none of the new arrivals was occupying his attention, he would watch the squirrels for a while. He seemed utterly self-contained, completely detached from everything that was going on in front of him, but I knew that AT A SUBTLE LEVEL HE WAS ENGAGING WITH ALL THE THOUGHTS AND DESIRES THAT WERE BEING BEAMED AT HIM FROM THE ASSEMBLED MASSES.”
Sri Keers writes that not being quite content with the mental quiet that he experienced in Sri Bhagwan’s radiant Presence, he began to bombard Sri Bhagwan with thoughts with all the mental energy that he could summon up. ‘Bhagwan, of what use is all your radiance to me if I cannot solve my mental problems the moment I leave you.’ This thought he repeated again and again with minor variations. However Sri Bhagwan was not responding and remained indifferent. Sri Keers says that the whole force of his will was so focussed on this thought that he felt that he was shaking Him the way he would shake a tree to get a fruit to fall off.               He was adamant. He must have an answer from Sri Bhagwan. At long last, his                mental persistence paid off. For Sri Bhagwan turns to him with a smile  which ssemd to convey with utmost clarity, “What do you want? You are looking for your glasses, and they are on your nose !”

Sri Keers notes that no words passed His lips, but the above message was conveyed to him with unbelievable clarity.  Sri Bhagwan continues to gaze at him.
“Suddenly his eyes emitted light and spat fire at me. I can think of no other way of describing that sudden explosion in his gaze. His powerful look went straight into me, boring away at everything that made me think I was different and separate from him. I felt the right-hand side heart centre begin to get warm. I had often felt it during the course of my meditation, and I had often had the feeling of being absorbed and consumed by this centre, but this was something completely different. The heart-centre got warmer and warmer as he continued to gaze at me until I felt it to be a hot, fiery ball glowing inside me. It felt as if Bhagwan were charging with some immensely powerful spiritual electricity because, as he continued to look at me, I had the unmistakable feeling that this heart-centre was some kind of spiritual dynamo that was emitting sparks of light and energy. I felt as if some enormously potent electric apparatus had been suddenly transplanted into my chest. I sat rigid and straight, my eyes glued to his. Fire flowed from his glowing eyes and drilled into the core of my being. Kill me, I prayed.”

Sri Keers says that he was unaware how long this transmission lasted. When the eyes were locked there was no meaning of the time and space in that NEVER-ENDING MOMENT. But Sri Keers concedes that he had by now reached the limit of his capacity to absorb the Grace. He could take It no longer. His body could sustain no longer the strain. He felt as if he was about to explode. And, therefore, he mentally prayed to let him go.
So, Sri keers had the Initiation he wished for. He says that the above is the briefest explanation of what happened during those cathartic moments. Complete transformation, inside and outside, and it all happened without a word being spoken. “That communication through SILENCE WAS CLEARER AND MORE DIRECT THAN ANY EXPLANATION THAT COUD HAVE BEEN GIVEN IN WORDS “.

So, Sri Keers concede that he was taken to the limit of his readiness. When he felt that he could take it no longer, he withdrew from the encounter.
Sri Keers mentions that he had received the parting gifts, and he could have asked for nothing more valuable. 
Yes, what could be more valuable !

Dear sir, Sri Keers’s account is the quint-essence of the Guru Kataksham. When you mentioned about it, first I went through it, assimilated it, and then something from within inspired me to write and post the beautiful account of the Great Encounter  as I understood it.

Dear sir, but that was before the Maha Samadhi. I know at least one more way, in addition to what you have enumerated and which is quoted at the top of this post, through which Sri Bhagwan Gazed and initiated His devotees NOW, perhaps around the world. But I do not wish to say anything about it for the reason that some may ridicule it.   

Regards,
   Anil
             

           


eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1272 on: August 11, 2011, 10:54:49 AM »
Dear Sri Subramanian sir and devotees, I forgot to mention the source of the account of Sri Wolters A Keers's initiation, given in my privious post. It has been taken from 'The Power of the Presence, Part three, edited by Sri David Godman.

Thank you,
  Anil 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1273 on: August 11, 2011, 03:14:13 PM »


Dear Anil,

Yes. The transforming encounter of Wolter A. Kiers through the gaze of
Sri Bhagavan, was a wonderful incident.  Only a few seekers had
that golden benefit. viz., Muruganar and a few others.



Arunachala Siva. 

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1274 on: August 12, 2011, 07:27:20 AM »
 
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #1304 on: August 09, 2011, 02:57:18 PM »


Dear Anil,

Yes. All other methods like japa, dhyana, nityakarma etc., are only
for chittasuddhi. But self inquiry will not only confer self abidance
but will first ensure chittasuddhi itself.



Arunachala Siva.

Dear Sri Subramanian Sir,

I consider Sri Sadhu Om’s insight with regard to other spiritual practices, such as repetition (japa) of holy names, meditation (dhyana), concentration  on anyone of six yogic centres in the body, etc., is very apt and in my view, simply brilliant.He says in his ‘ The Path of Sri Ramana, Part One ’that the power which the mind derives from other spiritual practices is not that power which is required to abide in its source ! In all these practices, the mind is only made to attend to some alien ,or second or third person objects. He says that the strength of the mind acquired by training it to catch hold to some alien entity is not the genuine strength of mind which is favourable for Self-knowledge. A new cow bought by a farmer is tied up in another man’s shed for some days where she gets accustomed to the surroundings. Now, when the owner of the cow tries to take her to his own shed, will she easily come and keep quiet ? Sri Om says that so also, aspirants who have developed mental strength by concentrating to second and third person objects struggle and find it difficult EVEN TO UNDERSTAND WHAT SELF-ATTENTION IS: HOW TO TAKE THE FEELING OF ONE’S OWN EXISTENCE AS THE TARGET ! It is the experience of anyone who has trained his mind in other practices over a long period of time that such a mind is still weaker to turn Self-wards than even an ordinary mind untrained in any other practice.

He cites the example of the experience of Sri Ganapati Muni who is considered to be one of the most important disciples of Sri Bhagwan. No one excelled him in doing japa. He is said to have performed japa by crores and was even proclaimed to be ‘Mantreshwar’, the Lord of mantras by his disciples. He himself refers himself as such in Ramana  Gita (Vh. 18, v. 15). He developed wonderful mental powers such as ability to compose in Sanskrit extempore verses and the ability to attend to a hundred things at the same time. But, nevertheless, he used to say, “I can even go to Indra-loka and can say what Indra is doing, BUT I CANNOT GO WITHIN AND FIND THE SOURCE OF ‘I’. Sri Bhagwan Himself remarked on a number of occasions that Nayana used to say that it was easy for him to send the mind forward but impossible for him to make it go back ward, that is, to turn it inward. Sri Muni said that he could go forward to second and third persons any distance at any speed, but he found it difficult to take even one step backward, that is towards the first person.

Then, of course, question arises, “When the truth is such, why did Sri Bhagwan say in ‘Who am I ?’ that by meditation upon forms of God and by repetition of sacred words, thoughts subside more and more, and thus gains one-pointedness and for the mind which thus gains one-pointedness, Self-enquiry will easily be attained and therefore Self-enquiry becomes easy for those who do japa , dhyana ,etc. ?

Sri Om says that we should scrutinise deeply what is meant in ‘Who am I?’ Perpetually wandering mind expands into innumerable thoughts, making each thought extremely weak. Therefore, by such practices the mind is trained to hold on to anyone of the names of God so that it gains one-pointedness, that is, the strength to cling to one thing only. Just as an iron chain is given to the restless trunk of an elephant to cling fast only to that to avoid mischief by its trunk.SO, BY SUCH PRACTICES THE MIND MERELY LOSES THE TENDENCY OF BRANCHING OUT INTO MANY THOUGHTS. That is all.

There are two kinds of impediments which are obstacles for the mind to achieve Self-abidance, and hence two kinds of mental strength are essential to overcome them.
1.   The mental strength required to prevent the mind from branching out into innumerable thoughts through the tendencies towards the sense objects.
2.   The mental strength required to direct the mind towards the first person or the Self or the strength to attend to Self.
Sri sadhu Om explains that by practices such as repetition (japa) and meditation (dhyana), etc. the strength to be free from the first impediment, that is, free from the tendencies towards the sense objects is acquired. Though through japa and dhyana the mind gains the strength not to branch out into many thoughts and thereby become weak, these practices develop the power of the mind to cling with great attachment only to ONE SECOND PERSON OR ANOTHER, AND IN THIS WAY THE SECOND GREAT IMPEDIMENT, NAMELY THE INABILITY TO TURN THE MIND FROM THE SECOND PERSON TO THE FIRST PERSON IS UNKNOWINGLY INCREASED. Therefore, when such a mind tries to turn Self-wards, it will find it very difficult indeed. Sri Om says that this is the truth we have to learn from the personal experience of Sri Ganapati Muni.

THEREFORE, IT FOLLOWS NATURALLY THAT FOR A MIND WHICH ENGAGES IN SELF-ATTENTION FROM THE VERY THE BEGINNING, BOTH KINDS OF REQUSITE SRENGTH ARE NATURALLY CULTIVATED.
                                     Source; The path of Sri Ramana, Part One
                                                                                          To continue in the next post

Regrds,
   Anil