Author Topic: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi  (Read 68223 times)

silentgreen

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Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« on: October 06, 2010, 03:52:44 PM »
Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
By Devadatta Kali
(condensed from the original writing)

In The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, M[Mahendranath Gupta] records a Sunday afternoon with some visitors to Dakshineswar in the winter of 1883. One of the visitors was well versed in the shastras [the sacred Hindu scriptures], and the conversation caused M. to fall into a pensive mood. Having some knowledge of Vedanta, he later asked Sri Ramakrishna, “Is the world unreal?”

Why should it be unreal?” Sri Ramakrishna responded. “What you are asking is a matter for philosophical discussion.” Later that evening Ramakrishna returned to M.’s question and asked him again, “Why should the universe be unreal?” He continued, “The Divine Mother revealed to me in the Kali temple that it was She who had become everything. She showed me that everything was full of Consciousness. The image …, the altar …, the water-vessels …, the door-sill …, the marble floor … — all was Consciousness.

“I found everything inside the room soaked, as it were, in Bliss — the Bliss of Satchidananda. I saw a wicked man in front of the Kali temple, but in him I also saw the Power of the Divine Mother vibrating. “That is why I fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to the Divine Mother. I clearly perceived that the Divine Mother Herself had become everything (M., 345-346).”

The Devisukta (RV 10.125) declares that the Goddess is the power expressed through all the gods, that they are united in her who shines with consciousness, that her presence is all-pervading, that she supports all of creation, that she is the source of righteousness and the revealer of truth, that she is the source of all worlds, yet that she shines transcendent beyond them. Among Shaktas this Vedic hymn is held in high esteem and is considered to be the source from which the entire Chandi sprang. Later, the Chandi itself was elaborated upon in the Puranas and Tantras. Still later its imagery inspired the Bengali mystics, Ramprasad and Kamalakanta, whose devotional songs so often evoked ecstatic moods in Sri Ramakrishna.

In drawing comparison to the Bhagavad Gita, the authors of the Chandi wanted specifically to emphasize the Divine Mother’s role, like Krishna’s, in upholding the moral order of the universe and in leading humankind to liberation through the highest knowledge of the Self. The Chandi and the Gita have much else in common. Each is an independent text embedded in a larger work. The Gita belongs to the Mahabharata; the Chandi is an interpolation in the Markandeya Purana. Each is a synthesis of spiritual and philosophical knowledge drawn from diverse sources. Each begins with the story of one or more human beings in crisis, who will learn from a teacher in human form the way beyond all suffering. And each involves the battlefield as a metaphor for the field of human consciousness.

The Bhagavad Gita begins on the battlefield, with Arjuna surveying the armies of his kinsmen on both sides, arrayed for battle. Plunged into despair at the thought of killing his friends and relatives, he turns to his charioteer, Krishna, who is none other than God in human form. Krishna then delivers one of the world’s great spiritual messages. The Chandi begins with King Suratha, likewise plunged into an existential crisis after losing his kingdom in battle.

A wise and just ruler, Suratha discovers that even his trusted ministers have turned against him, and on the pretext of going hunting, he mounts his horse and flees for his life. After riding for some time into a dense forest, he comes to the ashram of a holy man named Medhas. This forest retreat is a place of great calm and natural beauty, where even the ordinarily ferocious tiger abides peacefully with the gentle deer. Yet Suratha knows no peace. His mind churns in agony at the thought of everything he has lost: his kingdom with its riches and privilege, the loyalty of his subjects, the glory of power. These thoughts torment him ceaselessly.

One day another visitor arrives. His name is Samadhi, and he is every bit as despondent as the king. Once a prosperous merchant, he has been cast out by his wife and sons, who seized his wealth out of greed. He is deeply hurt by their betrayal and cannot understand it, being himself a man of good character. Most of all, he cannot understand why he still feels love for those who caused his deep humiliation and pain. And so, the king and the merchant approach Medhas the seer and ask why they are so miserable. Surely, as men of knowledge they ought to know better, but they are deeply perplexed.

“You say you are men of knowledge,” Medhas remarks. “Do you know what knowledge is?” He explains that what the king means by knowledge is only the experience of the objective world. Through the senses, men, birds and beasts alike share such a knowledge, each species according to its own capacity. Such knowledge is relative. In every way, the knowledge gained through the senses is conditioned by time and space, and we are constantly deceived. Medhas explains further that animals act out of instinct; but humans have the added capacity to reason and make choices, although such choices are most often driven by self-interest and the expectation of results.

If even our simple sense perceptions are so misleading, how much more confounded are we by the added factors of reason, will, memory, emotion and expectation? The operative principle here is that nothing in this world is as it seems to be. Not only are the king and the merchant perplexed, Medhas explains, everyone is, because even the wise are thrown into the whirlpool of delusion by the blessed Goddess Mahamaya. “Who is this Mahamaya?” the king asks. “Whatever there is to know about her, all that I wish to learn.”

And so we arrive at the heart of the Chandi. The story of the king, the merchant and the seer acts as a frame that encloses three additional stories which Medhas relates to instruct his two disciples. Each story is an account of the Divine Mother’s fierce, bloody battles with demons. Chandi falls into three parts, and they can be related to the three gunas, the basic universal energies or qualities of sattva, rajas and tamas.


First Part: The story of Madhu and Kaitabha:

During a period of cosmic dissolution, Lord Vishnu lies sleeping on the thousand-headed serpent Shesha, who drifts on the waters of the undifferentiated ocean. Sitting on a lotus that grows from Vishnu’s navel, Brahma, the Lord of Creation, surveys the four directions. Suddenly two demons, named Madhu and Kaitabha, spring forth from the wax in Vishnu’s ears and attempt to kill Brahma. Frantically he tries to awaken Vishnu, but the god is held in the power of Mahamaya, who is settled over his eyes as his blessed sleep.

And so Brahma praises Mahamaya with a hymn. She allows Vishnu to awaken, and he battles with the demons for 5000 years, but without victory. At this point Mahamaya intervenes again. She confounds Madhu and Kaitabha with delusions of their own might and grandeur. Look at us, the demons think. Not even Vishnu, the Supreme Lord, can conquer us. Because he has fought so well, let us offer him a boon. They offered a boon and made a great mistake of pride.

Vishnu replies, “There is only one boon to ask: that I destroy the two of you here and now.” In a last-ditch effort to save themselves, Madhu and Kaitabha look around and see only the endless cosmic ocean. “Very well,” they say, “but on one condition: slay us where water does not cover the earth.” The outcome of this story hinges on a pun, because the Sanskrit words for “earth” and “thigh” are almost the same. And so, Vishnu lifts the two demons to his thighs and cuts off their heads.

Madhu and Kaitabha, in their near-bestial state, recognize no higher reality; they are violent, ugly creatures intent on gratifying their base instincts, often expressed through the thrill of intimidation or brute force. In their physical strength they grow exceedingly vainglorious. But of course pride goes before a fall, and their own arrogance becomes their undoing. Through the hymn that Brahma addresses to Mahamaya, the universal deluder, we learn much about the universe we inhabit. This hymn, the Brahmastuti, is composed in highly symbolic language that is often difficult to interpret, but it reveals profound insight into the nature of the cosmos. Although the ideas are expressed in devotional terms, the concepts are scientific even by today’s standards.

The Brahmastuti tells us that creation is a process of manifestation that flows from the One to the many. The Divine Mother is the infinite, nondual consciousness as well as its dynamic creative power; and she is ever present throughout all of creation. Before manifestation, she is the bindu, the dimensionless, nonlocalized point of concentrated shakti that contains within itself all possibilities. The Divine Mother gives birth to the universe, supports it and draws it back into herself in an ever-repeating cycle, because creation is without an absolute beginning or an absolute end. In this process, she who is nondual consciousness veils her radiant boundlessness with the limitations of time and space, name and form, cause and effect. Through these limitations she projects the finite world of our experience — a world that is both dark and dazzling, terrifying and enchanting. The Divine Mother is the all-encompassing source of good and evil alike, who expresses herself in every form. Yet beyond this apparent multiplicity, everything — be it spirit, mind or matter — is ultimately one.


to be continued ...
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silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2010, 03:54:02 PM »
continued ..

Second Part: The story of Mahishasura:

Medhas’s second story is intended especially for the king. Suratha, like Arjuna in the Gita, belongs to the ruling and warrior caste, whose duty is to uphold the moral order of the world. In the story that Medhas relates, an ill-tempered buffalo demon, named Mahishasura, wages war against heaven, casts out the gods, and usurps Indra’s throne. When the dispossessed gods seek Vishnu’s and Shiva’s help, the Divine Mother herself comes to the rescue.

First from Vishnu’s brow, then from the bodies of all the other gods, a great radiance shines forth and coalesces into the beautiful form of Durga. The gods bow to her, recognizing that their own individual powers are only aspects of her supreme power. After Durga has slain Mahishasura’s forces, she stands on the blood-soaked battleground facing the buffalo demon himself. Mahishasura, bellowing in confrontation, represents willfulness and monumental rage. Under his frenzied wheeling, the trampled earth breaks apart, his blasting breath tosses mountains into the air, his lashing tail causes the oceans to overflow, and overhead his mighty horns tear the gently floating clouds to shreds.

Consider the symbolism: the power of human anger and greed threatens to destroy everything it touches: the goodness of the nurturing earth, the stability of the mountains, the expansive beauty of the oceans, the innocence of the gentle clouds. Under Durga’s attacks Mahisha changes form — from buffalo to lion to man to elephant, every time eluding her deathblows. But she resolves to slay him, and when Mahisha returns to his mighty buffalo form, she pins him beneath her foot and thrusts her spear into his side. Instantly Mahisha reveals his true demon form, and Durga beheads him with her great sword.

Like Mahisha, we go through life dissatisfied, often agitated, sometimes full of rage; and the causes of our misery change over time. One day it’s this, the next day it’s something else, and so it goes. Until we can pin down the root cause, our discontent cannot be overcome, and like Mahishasura that cause is loath to reveal itself. Mahisha represents more than monumental rage. His anger is one of six passions that afflict our human awareness. The others are lust, greed, pride, jealousy and delusion.

The Divine Mother is infinite consciousness. When she projects herself as the universe of name and form, that consciousness appears divided among all beings. This apparent fragmentation creates the sense of individuality. Each individual self experiences its existence in terms of “I, me and mine,” as well as “not-I, not-me and not-mine.” And so the trouble begins. The root cause of our inner existential discontent and our outward conflicts is the feeling deep down inside that we are limited, separated and incomplete. We mistakenly identify with the limited ego, when in fact we are the limitless atman. That atman, abiding in every person, is the true Self — the one, undivided reality whose essence is pure being-consciousness-bliss.

Just as Mahishasura is about to be beheaded by Durga’s sword of knowledge, his glance meets hers, and he gets a fleeting glimpse of that truth — that his true identity lies dispassionate and blissful beyond the raging whirlpool of his passions. After he is slain, the gods celebrate Durga’s triumph over Mahishasura in the longest and most eloquent of the Chandi’s four hymns. Known as the Shakradistuti [Praise by Indra and the host of gods], it invites us to reflect on the themes of good and evil, fate and free will, karma and divine grace.

The hymn praises Durga as “good fortune in the dwellings of the virtuous and misfortune in the abodes of the wicked (DM 4.5).” On the surface, this verse implies reward and punishment by a personal deity. The deeper, philosophical meaning points to an impersonal balancing principle at work in the universe, the law of karma.

The story of Madhu and Kaitabha was concerned with the power of tamas: how in our ordinary state of being, we all walk around dazed and confused. In the story of Durga and Mahishasura, the power of rajas predominates. Mahishasura’s rajasic energy controls him and impels him to destructive acts, but Durga controls her own fiery splendor. Her rajas is protective of her devotees and intent on destroying evil. Through this story Medhas teaches that through active struggle, we can overcome enslavement to our passions and live virtuously, in harmony with the world.

According to Hindu teaching, life has four legitimate aims. These are dharma, artha, kama and moksha — virtuous conduct, material comfort, enjoyment and liberation. The first three form a category called bhukti, concerned with life in the world. Bhukti is the king’s immediate concern. Having fled to the forest after his defeat, he has failed to fulfill his moral responsibility, and he still feels attraction for the privileges of kingship. In other words, he has unfinished business in the world. How different is the merchant Samadhi. World-weary and ready to renounce the pursuits of dharma, artha and kama, he is ready for moksha, spiritual liberation. For his sake, Medhas tells his third and final story, one that points toward realizing our inner perfection beyond the world


to be continued ...
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silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2010, 04:01:27 PM »
continued ...

Third Part: The story of Shumbha and Nishumbha:

Two demons, named Shumbha and Nishumbha, have dispossessed the gods, stripped them of their powers and appropriated their wealth and privilege. This time the cast of characters is much larger, and the demons seem more like us than the ones we’ve met previously.

The complex scenario passes through three phases as we move progressively inward. The Mother’s successive victories over a colorful cast of demons symbolize our own efforts at purifying our consciousness of every imperfection and misconceived notion. First the myth turns the mirror on our behavior and motivations. Next we are drawn in deeper to observe the mind and its workings, and finally we face the fundamental question of who or what we are.

We first meet Shumbha sitting in his palace amid his glittering hoard of stolen treasure. The sickening excess of it all reminds us of our own materialism run amok. Soon the two fawning servants, Chanda and Munda, enter with news that they’ve seen a young woman of captivating beauty dwelling in the Himalayas. Playing upon Shumbha’s vanity, they suggest that he who is all-wealthy and all-powerful surely must also possess this jewel among women. Little do they know that she is the Devi, the Divine Mother herself, in her sattvic aspect. In the same way, we are drawn to the world’s enchantments but forget that they are expressions of the Divine. Shumbha, his lust aroused, wants to claim her as his own, just as we want to possess all that we find attractive and desirable. And just like us, if one way fails, Shumbha will try another, and another, with growing frustration.

When his smooth-talking messenger, Sugriva, delivers a marriage proposal, we recognize in him our own lack of complete truthfulness. At first the Devi plays along with delicious irony, but after she refuses the marriage proposal, Sugriva’s honeyed words turn threatening. If cajoling and deceit don’t work, how about force? Next, Shumbha sends a dim-witted thug named Dhumralochana to fetch the Devi, kicking and screaming if need be. In other words, when we set our mind to something, how it affects others is not necessarily our concern.

When Dhumralochana’s brute force fails, Shumbha loses all reason and sends Chanda and Munda with a huge army to bring back “that vile woman” in any way or in any condition whatever. Notice how in Shumbha’s agitated mind “the jewel among women” is now “that vile woman.” What was once so desirable is now the cause of his misery, and his desire now is only for the triumph of his own will. Don’t we also overreact irrationally when circumstances frustrate our intentions? The struggle escalates, and the gently smiling Devi Durga calls forth the terrifying, emaciated form of Kali and eight other fierce goddesses to combat the demon hordes. Each one of these shaktis is an aspect of her own immense power. Each represents a higher function of our own consciousness.

When Chanda and Munda lie dead, a demon named Raktabija strides onto the battlefield. He possesses a unique power. Whenever a drop of his blood falls to earth, another demon of identical size and strength springs up. In the fighting, demons proliferate from his spilled blood, and utter terror seizes the gods, until Durga merely smiles and tells Kali to roam the battlefield and lap up the drops of blood as they fall. The demons arising from it soon perish between her gnashing teeth; and Raktabija, drained of blood, falls dead.

This scene bridges two levels of reality. On one level the glistening red drops of Raktabija’s blood represent the overwhelming power of desire. Like a seed, every desire that falls on the fertile soil of our mind grows to maturity and bursts with seeds for the next planting. Every desire produces the seeds of many more, and we find we are never satisfied. The ghastly image of Kali, in her red-eyed, emaciated form known as Chamunda, avidly licking up the drops of blood, tells us that desires are best conquered when nipped in the bud.

Another interpretation of the Raktabija episode takes us deeper into the mind. Patanjali, whose Yoga Sutra systematized the science of meditation more than two thousand years ago, wrote, “Yoga is the control of the thought-waves in the mind.” Anyone who has ever sat to meditate knows how difficult this is. No matter how hard we try to concentrate, the mind wanders from here to there. One thought gives rise to another. Raktabija symbolizes this normal, unruly state of human consciousness, where mental energy is scattered and unfocused. Chamunda Kali is the power of concentrated awareness that subdues the thought-waves and takes us to a calmer, purer state of consciousness.

Finally, only two demons remain, the brothers Shumbha and Nishumbha. They are almost inseparable, and the Chandi calls Nishumbha the younger brother who is dearer to Shumbha than life itself. Shumbha represents the ego, and Nishumbha is the sense of attachment, the tag-along sibling that accompanies him everywhere. Earlier we spoke about the ego as a sense of separate selfhood. What we call ego is a limiting function of consciousness that in Sanskrit is called ahamkara, literally the “I- maker.” It is both a process of consciousness and the product of that process. Along with the sense of its own individuality, this I-making principle has the power of self-appropriation that claims things as its own.

Here is where Nishumbha comes in. The attachment he represents is called mamatva, literally, “my-ness.” In a sense it is the glue that holds our identity together. We consciously attach our sense of self to things that are not the Self. We identify with our bodily characteristics, such as sex, size, shape, color. We define ourselves by our likes and dislikes, by the people in our lives and our relationships to them, by our professions, leisure activities, religious or political affiliations and countless other factors that combine in ways to make each one of us unique. We use our life’s experiences — what we do and what happens to us — to shape and reshape our identity. And so, our sense of self is constantly shifting.

Sri Ramakrishna noted how a fine new garment or a new pair of boots can change an ordinary man into a swaggering fool, or how money can make a humble man arrogant (M., 169). Is our sense of self so fragile that a slight change of circumstance can cause us to reformulate ourselves? Every factor we identify with is known in Sanskrit as an upadhi, a defining attribute. But upadhi also means a limiting adjunct. We go through life acquiring upadhis, thinking they will make our identity bigger and better, but in reality we are merely adding to our limitations. Attachments to fame, influence, wealth and possessions only make our burden of personal identity heavier. The more we are reined in by our defining attributes, the more we lose sight of our larger sense of self.

When we allow our happiness and misery to be dictated by things outside of and foreign to our true nature, we lose our autonomy. Let’s consider the third meaning of upadhi: a substitute, anything that may be taken for something else, an appearance mistaken for reality. Our defining upadhis are components of a false sense of our own identity. In the end, they are no more than worthless tokens of our separation from the infinite Self. But how we hold on to them! When the Divine Mother finally slays Nishumbha, we get a graphic image of the ferocity of the struggle. Just when she has the demon cornered, he sprouts ten thousand arms with ten thousand grasping hands. This picture of ugly desperation illustrates just how desperate we are not to let go.

Even with Nishumbha out of the way, there remains the ego-sense itself, denuded of all borrowed attributes. Now Shumbha, alone, stands face to face with the Mother. He points to her companion goddesses and chides her for relying on the strength of others in the fight. She answers, “I am alone here in the world. … These are but projections of my own power… (DM 10.5). ” To prove her point, the Shaktis vanish into her, and she then slays Shumbha. This final victory represents the realization of the true Self.

There is no way to describe this immediate, unmediated knowledge of the atman; but that has not stopped mystics of every religious tradition throughout history from trying to express the inexpressible experience of the Divine. In the Svetasvatara Upanishad, a text certainly known to whoever composed the Chandi, the enlightened seer proclaims, “I have known the unchanging, primeval One, the indwelling Self of all, everywhere present and all-pervading, whom the wise declare to be free from birth and eternal (SU 3.21).”

Medhas then relates how the gods again praised the Divine Mother in a fourth and final hymn. Three of its verses (DM 11.10-12) are well known in Vedanta circles. They are sung every evening around the world in temples of the Ramakrishna Order as the arati hymn “Om Sarva Mangala Mangalye.” Then, Medhas sends his two disciples to the bank of a river, where they meditate and worship the Mother devotedly. After three years she appears to them and offers each a boon. Suratha asks for the return of his earthly kingdom, followed by an imperishable kingdom in the next life. The merchant Samadhi, on the other hand, has grown wise and dispassionate. He asks for the knowledge that will dissolve the bondage of worldly existence.

Through the Mother’s grace, each boon is granted, in keeping with the Chandi’s teaching that the Divine Mother is bhuktimuktipradayini, “the bestower of worldly enjoyment and liberation (DM11.7).” How conversant Sri Ramakrishna was with the teachings of the Chandi is made clear in a conversation he had with members of the Brahmo Samaj in the autumn of 1882. In a single paragraph that summarizes the essential message of the Chandi, Ramakrishna said, “Bondage and liberation are both of Her making. By her maya worldly people become entangled in ‘woman and gold,’ and again, through her grace they attain liberation. She is called the Savior, and the Remover of the bondage that binds one to the world (M., 136).”

A short while later he added, “I tell you the truth: there is nothing wrong in your being in the world. But you must direct your mind toward God; otherwise you will not succeed. Do your duty with one hand and with the other hold to God. After the duty is over, you will hold to God with both hands (M., 137-138).” On another occasion Sri Ramakrishna said, “Sometimes I find that the universe is saturated with the Consciousness of God, as the earth is soaked with water in the rainy season (M., 260).” This calls to mind the Chandi’s third hymn, known as the Aparajitastuti, [Hymn to the Invincible Goddess].

Unlike the three other hymns, which are intimately connected to the foregoing battle narratives, this one is an ecstatic celebration of the Divine Mother’s presence in the world. It reminds us simply to see divinity everywhere around us, because the Mother abides in all beings as intelligence, order, forgiveness, modesty, peace, beauty, good fortune, compassion, contentment, and in countless other ways. We need only to remember her presence; and as a sign of her grace, it is she herself who abides in us even in the form of memory.

We conclude with two verses from this hymn: “To her who presides over the elements and the senses and is ever present in all beings, to the all-pervading Devi, salutations again and again. To her who pervades this entire world and abides in the form of consciousness, salutation to her, salutation to her, salutation to her, again and again (DM 5.77-80).”


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silentgreen

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Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2010, 12:30:12 PM »
या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु
Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu


Devi Durga


नमो   देव्यै   महादेव्यै   शिवायै   सततं   नमः   ।
नमः   प्रकृत्यै   भद्रायै   नियताः   प्रणताः   स्म   ताम्   ॥१॥

Namo Devyai Mahaadevyai Shivaayai Satatam Namah |
Namah Prakrtyai Bhadraayai Niyataah Prannataah Sma Taam ||1||

Salutations to the Devi, to the Mahadevi. Salutations always to her who is ever auspicious.
Salutations to her who is the primordial cause and the sustaining power. With attention, we have made obeisance to her.



रौद्रायै   नमो   नित्यायै   गौर्यै   धात्र्यै   नमो   नमः   ।
ज्योत्स्नायै   चेन्दुरूपिण्यै   सुखायै   सततं   नमः   ॥२॥

Raudraayai Namo Nityaayai Gauryai Dhaatryai Namo Namah |
Jyotsnaayai Cenduruupinnyai Sukhaayai Satatam Namah ||2||

Salutations to her who is terrible, to her who is eternal. Salutations to Gauri, the supporter (of the Universe).
Salutations always to her who is of the form of the moon and moon-light and happiness itself.



कल्याण्यै   प्रणता   वृद्धयै   सिद्धयै   कुर्मो   नमो   नमः   ।
नैर्ऋत्यै   भूभृतां   लक्ष्म्यै   शर्वाण्यै   ते   नमो   नमः   ॥३॥

Kalyaannyai Prannataa Vrddhayai Siddhayai Kurmo Namo Namah |
Nairrtyai Bhuubhrtaam Lakssmyai Sharvaannyai Te Namo Namah ||3||

We bow to her who is welfare; we make salutations to her who is properity and success.
Salutations to the consort of Siva who is herself the good fortune as well as misfortune of kings.



दुर्गायै   दुर्गपारायै   सारायै   सर्वकारिण्यै   ।
ख्यात्यै   तथैव   कृष्णायै   धूम्रायै   सततं   नमः   ॥४॥

Durgaayai Durgapaaraayai Saaraayai Sarvakaarinnyai |
Khyaatyai Tathaiva Krssnnaayai Dhuumraayai Satatam Namah ||4||

Salutations always to Durga who takes one across in difficulties, who is essence, who is the author of everything.
who is knowledge of discrimination; and who is blue-black as also smoke-like in complexion.



अतिसौम्यातिरौद्रायै   नतास्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ।
नमो   जगत्प्रतिष्ठायै   देव्यै   कृत्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥५॥

Atisaumyaatiraudraayai Nataastasyai Namo Namah |
Namo Jagatpratisstthaayai Devyai Krtyai Namo Namah ||5||

We prostate before her who is at once most gentle and most terrible; we salute her again and again.
Salutations to her who is the support of the world. Salutations to the Devi who is of the form of volition.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   विष्णुमायेति   शब्दिता   ।
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥६॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Vissnnumaayeti Shabditaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||6||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who in all beings is called Visnumaya.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   चेतनेत्यभिधीयते   ।
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥७॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Cetanetyabhidhiiyate |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||7||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings as consciousness.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   बुद्धिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥८॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Buddhiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||8||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of intelligence.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   निद्रारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥९॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Nidraaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||9||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of sleep.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   क्षुधारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१०॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Kssudhaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||10||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of hunger.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   छायारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥११॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Chaayaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||11||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of reflection.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   शक्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१२॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Shaktiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||12||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of power.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   तृष्णारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१३॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Trssnnaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||13||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of thirst.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   क्षान्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१४॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Kssaantiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||14||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of forgiveness.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   जातिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१५॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Jaatiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||15||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of genus.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   लज्जारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१६॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Lajjaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||16||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of modesty.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   शान्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१७॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Shaantiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||17||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of peace.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   श्रद्धारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१८॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Shraddhaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||18||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of faith.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   कान्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥१९॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Kaantiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||19||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of loveliness.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   लक्ष्मीरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२०॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Lakssmiiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||20||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of good fortune.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   वृत्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२१॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Vrttiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||21||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of activity.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   स्मृतिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२२॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Smrtiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||22||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of memory.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   दयारूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२३॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Dayaaruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||23||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of compassion.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   तुष्टिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२४॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Tussttiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||24||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of contentment.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   मातृरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२५॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Maatrruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||25||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of mother.



या   देवी   सर्वभुतेषु   भ्रान्तिरूपेण   संस्थिता   ।   
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२६॥

Yaa Devii Sarvabhutessu Bhraantiruupenna Samsthitaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||26||

Salutations again and again to the Devi who abides in all beings in the form of error.



इन्द्रियाणामधिष्ठात्री   भुतानां   चाखिलेषु   या   ।
भूतेषु   सततं   तस्यै   व्याप्तिदेव्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२७॥

Indriyaannaamadhisstthaatrii Bhutaanaam Caakhilessu Yaa |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||27||

To the all-pervading Devi who constantly presides over the senses of all beings and (governs) all the elements.



चितिरूपेण   या   कृत्स्नमेतद्व्याप्य   स्थिता   जगत्   ।
नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमस्तस्यै   नमो   नमः   ॥२८॥

Citiruupenna Yaa Krtsnametadvyaapya Sthitaa Jagat |
Namastasyai Namastasyai Namastasyai Namo Namah ||28||

Salutations again and again to her who, pervading this entire world, abides in the form of consciousness.


Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2010, 11:29:33 AM »
महिषासुरमर्दिनि   स्तोत्रम्:   अयि   गिरिनन्दिनि   नन्दितमेदिनि
Mahissaasuramardini Stotram: Ayi Girinandini Nanditamedini

(by Ramakrishna Kavi)
(English translation by S.N.Sastri)


Devi Durga

अयि गिरिनन्दिनि नन्दितमेदिनि विश्वविनोदिनि नन्दिनुते
गिरिवरविन्ध्यशिरोऽधिनिवासिनि विष्णुविलासिनि जिष्णुनुते ।
भगवति हे शितिकण्ठकुटुम्बिनि भुरिकुटुम्बिनि भुरिकृते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १ ॥

Ayi Giri Nandini Nandita Medini Vishvavinodini Nandinute
Girivara Vindhya Shirodhinivaasini Vissnnu Vilaasini Jissnnunute |
Bhagavati He Shitikannttha Kuttumbini Bhurikuttumbini Bhurikrte
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 1 ||

1. O Daughter of the Mountain, who delight the earth, who make the whole universe enjoy, who are praised by Nandikesvara, who dwell on the summit of the king of mountains, the Vindhyas, who took the form of the consort of Vishnu (as Lakshmi), who are praised by Indra, O consort of Siva (the blue-necked), who have innumerable families, who are the Creatrix of the whole universe, who slew the demon Mahisha, who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



सुरवरवर्षिणि दुर्धरधर्षिणि दुर्मुखमर्षिणि हर्षरते
त्रिभुवनपोषिणि शङ्करतोषिणि किल्बिषमोषिणि घोषरते
दनुजनिरोषिणि दितिसुतरोषिणि दुर्मदशोषिणि सिन्धुसुते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ २ ॥

Suravara Varssinni Durdharadharssinni Durmukhamarssinni Harssarate
Tribhuvana Possinni Shangkara Tossinni Kilbissa Mossinni Ghossarate
Danuja Nirossinni Ditisutarossinni Durmada Shossinni Sindhusute
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 2 ||

2. O Daughter of the Mountain, who delight Indra, who crushed the demon Durdhara, who subdued Durmukha, who are immersed in bliss, who nourish all the three worlds, who make Sankara happy, who remove all sins, who delight in celebration, who are angry with Asuras, who destroy evil pride, who destroyed the demon Durdama, who was born as the daughter of the ocean (as Lakshmi), who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि जगदम्ब मदम्ब कदम्ब वनप्रियवासिनि हासरते
शिखरि शिरोमणि तुङ्गहिमलय शृङ्गनिजालय मध्यगते ।
मधुमधुरे मधुकैटभगञ्जिनि कैटभभञ्जिनि हासरते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ३ ॥

Ayi Jagadamba Madamba Kadamba Vana Priyavaasini Haasarate
Shikhari Shiromanni Tungga Himalaya Shrngganijaalaya Madhyagate |
Madhumadhure Madhukaittabha Gan.jini Kaittabha Bhan.jini Haasarate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 3 ||

3. O Mother of the universe, who enjoy dwelling in Kadambavana, who is anointed with perfume, who sport a gentle smile, who dwell in Your abode on the peak of the lofty Himalaya mountain, the crest-jewel among mountains, who enjoy the sweetness of honey, who slew Madhu and Kaitabha, who destroy all sins, who delight in the Raasa dance, who crushed Mahishasura, who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि शतखण्ड विखण्डितरुण्ड वितुण्डितशुण्द गजाधिपते
रिपुगजगण्ड विदारणचण्ड पराक्रमशुण्ड मृगाधिपते ।
निजभुजदण्ड निपातितखण्ड विपातितमुण्ड भटाधिपते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ४ ॥

Ayi Shatakhanndda Vikhannddita Runndda Vitunndditashunnda Gajaadhipate
Ripugajaganndda Vidaarannacanndda Paraakrama Shunndda Mrgaadhipate |
Nijabhujadanndda Nipaatitakhanndda Vipaatitamunndda Bhattaadhipate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 4 ||

4. You who cut down with the weapon known as ‘Satakhanda’ the heads and trunks of mighty elephants, whose mount is the powerful lion which killed the elephants of the enemy with severe blows on their necks, who killed the ferocious generals of the army of Bhandasura with blows by your hand, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि रणदुर्मद शत्रुवधोदित दुर्धरनिर्जर शक्तिभृते
चतुरविचार धुरीणमहाशिव दूतकृत प्रमथाधिपते ।
दुरितदुरीह दुराशयदुर्मति दानवदुत कृतान्तमते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ५ ॥

Ayi Rannadurmada Shatruvadhodita Durdharanirjara Shaktibhrte
Catura Vicaara Dhuriinna Mahaashiva Duutakrta Pramathaadhipate |
Durita Duriiha Duraashayadurmati Daanavaduta Krtaantamate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 5 ||

5. O You whose might remains unbearable even after the burden has been removed by the slaying of arrogant enemies in battle, who made Siva Your messenger—Siva who is foremost in the art of discriminating between right and wrong, who slew the demon messenger who was sinful, cruel, and evil-minded, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि शरणागत वैरिवधुवर वीरवराभय दायकरे
त्रिभुवनमस्तक शुलविरोधि शिरोऽधिकृतामल शुलकरे ।
दुमिदुमितामर धुन्दुभिनादमहोमुखरीकृत दिङ्मकरे
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ६ ॥

Ayi Sharannaagata Vairivadhuvara Viiravaraabhaya Daayakare
Tribhuvana Mastaka Shulavirodhi Shirodhikrtaamala Shulakare |
Dumi Dumi Taamara Dhundubhinaadama Ahomukhariikrta Dingmakare
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 6 ||

6. You whose hands gave protection and boons to the brave husbands of the women in the enemy’s camp who surrendered themselves to You, who wield in Your hand for the slaying of enemies the sanctified trident which removes the sorrows of all the three worlds, who make the quarters resound with the divine musical instrument known as ‘Dundubhi’, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि निजहुङ्कृति मात्रनिराकृत धुम्रविलोचन धुम्रशते
समरविशोषित शोणितबीज समुद्भवशोणित बीजलते ।
शिवशिवशुम्भ निशुम्भमहाहव तर्पितभुत पिशाचरते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ७ ॥

Ayi Nija Hungkrti Maatraa Niraakrta Dhumravilocana Dhumrashate
Samara Vishossita Shonnitabiija Samudbhava Shonnita Biijalate |
Shiva Shiva Shumbha Nishumbha Mahaahava Tarpita Bhuta Pishaacarate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 7 ||

7. You who eliminated Dhoomralochana and hundreds pf Dhoomras by a mere ‘humkaara’, who slew in battle numerous Raktabijas who rose up from the blood of Raktabija who was weakened in the fight, and, wonder of wonders, who slew in a mighty battle Sumbha, Nisumbha, and the arrogant leaders of the ghosts, who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



धनुरनुषङ्ग रणक्षणसङ्ग परिस्फुरदङ्ग नटत्कटके
कनकपिशङ्ग पृशत्कनिषङ्ग रसद्भटशृङ्ग हताबटुके ।
कृतचतुरङ्ग बलक्षितिरङ्ग घटद्बहुरङ्ग रतद्बटुके
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ८ ॥

Dhanuranussangga Rannakssanna Sangga Pari Sphuradangga Nattatkattake
Kanaka Pishangga Prshatkanissangga Rasadbhattashrngga Hataabattuke |
Krta Caturangga Balakssitirangga Ghattadbahurangga Ratada Battuke
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 8 ||

8. You whose clinging bangles shine by contact with your body in the festival of the battle with bows, whose enemies are killed by blows on the back of their necks with the weapon known as ‘Sringa’ which is resplendent like gold and yellow in colour, and adorns your hip, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



जय जय जप्य जयेजयशब्द परस्तुति तत्परविश्वनुते
झणझणझिञ्झिमि झिङ्कृत नूपुरशिञ्चितमोहित भूतपते ।
नटित नटार्ध नटी नट नायक नाटितनाट्य सुगानरते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ९ ॥

Jaya Jaya Japya Jayejayashabda Parastuti Tatpara Vishvanute
Jhanna Jhanna Jhin.jhimi Jhingkrta Nuupurashin.cita Mohita Bhuutapate |
Nattita Nattaardha Nattii Natta Naayaka Naattitanaattya Sugaanarate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 9 ||

9. You whose praises are sung by people ever eager to praise You with charming words like ‘victory to You’, who captivate even Siva, the Lord of all beings with the clinging sound of Your anklets, who are fond of dancing with Siva in the sport in which He dances as Ardhanareeswara, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि सुमनःसुमनःसुमनः सुमनःसुमनोहरकान्तियुते
श्रितरजनी रजनीरजनी रजनीरजनी करवक्त्रवृते ।
सुनयनविभ्रमर भ्रमरभ्रमर भ्रमरभ्रमराधिपते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १० ॥

Ayi Sumanah Sumanah Sumanah Sumanah Sumanohara Kaantiyute
Shrita Rajanii Rajaniirajanii Rajanii Rajanii Karavaktravrte |
Sunayana Vibhramara Bhramara Bhramara Bhramarabhramaraadhipate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 10 ||

10. You who are supremely lustrous and decorated by the flowers in the form of the charming minds of the good, who shine like the moon for the lotuses in a lotus-pond, the movement of whose charming eyes gives the impression of hovering bees, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



to be continued ...
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2010, 11:31:28 AM »
continued ...


Devi Durga

सहितमहाहव मल्लमतल्लिक मल्लितरल्लक मल्लरते
विरचितवल्लिक पल्लिकमल्लिक झिल्लिकभिल्लिक वर्गवृते ।
शितकृतफुल्ल समुल्लसितारुण तल्लजपल्लव सल्ललिते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ ११ ॥

Sahita Mahaahava Mallamatallika Mallitarallaka Mallarate
Viracita Vallika Pallika Mallika Jhillika Bhillika Vargavrte |
Shitakrta Phulla Samullasitaarunna Tallajapallava Sallalite
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 11 ||

11. You who are fond of the sport in the form of a mighty battle against groups of mighty warriors, who are surrounded by hunters who build their huts with creepers and forest tribes known as Mallikas, Jhillikas and Bhillikas, whose body is soft like the beautiful tender red leaf, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अविरलगण्ड गलन्मदमेदुर मत्तमतङ्ग जराजपते
त्रिभुवनभुषण भुतकलानिधि रुपपयोनिधि राजसुते ।
अयि सुदतीजन लालसमानस मोहन मन्मथराजसुते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १२ ॥

Aviralaganndda Galanmada Medura Mattamatangga Jaraajapate
Tribhuvana Bhussanna Bhutakalaanidhi Rupapayonidhi Raajasute |
Ayi Sudatiijana Laalasamaanasa Mohana Manmatha Raajasute
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 12 ||

12. You whose gait is like that of a well-nourished lordly elephant in rut along whose cheeks there is an abundant flow of ichor, You who took the form of Goddess Lakshmi, the daughter of the ocean of milk which is the place of origin of the moon which is the eternal ornament of the three worlds, who captivate even Manmatha who captivates the minds of beautiful women full of desire, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



कमलदलामल कोमलकान्ति कलाकलितामल भाललते
सकलविलास कलानिलयक्रम केलिचलत्कल हंसकुले ।
अलिकुलसङ्कुल कुवलयमण्डल मौलिमिलद्बकुलालिकुले
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १३ ॥

Kamaladalaamala Komala Kaanti Kalaakalitaamala Bhaalalate
Sakala Vilaasa Kalaanilaya Krama Kelicalatkala Hamsakule |
Alikula Sangkula Kuvalaya Mannddala Maulimiladbakulaalikule
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 13 ||

13. O You whose forehead is incomparable and is lustrous like a tender beautiful lotus petal, who are the repository of all kinds of dances and are like the gently cooing swan, in whose hair there is an array of bees, whose hair is adorned with a garland of beautiful flowers, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



करमुरलीरव वीजितकूजित लज्जितकोकिल मञ्जुमते
मिलितपुलिन्द मनोहरगुञ्जित रञ्जितशैल निकुञ्जगते ।
निजगणभूत महाशबरीगण सद्गुणसम्भृत केलितले
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १४ ॥

Karamuraliirava Viijitakuujita Lajjita Kokila Man.jumate
Milita Pulinda Manoharagun.jita Ran.jitashaila Nikun.jagate |
Nijagannabhuuta Mahaashabariiganna Sadgunna Sambhrta Kelitale
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 14 ||

14. You who put to shame even the koel with the sweet tunes spreading out from Your flute, who move about among the creepers in the Kailasa mountain, who enjoy the dances of Your divine damsels and various other sports, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



कतितटपीत दुकूलविचित्र मयुखतिरस्कृत चन्द्ररुचे
प्रणतसुरासुर मौलिमणिस्फुर दंशुलसन्नख चन्द्ररुचे
जितकनकाचल मौलिमदोर्जित निर्भरकुञ्जर कुम्भकुचे
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १५ ॥

Katitattapiita Dukuulavicitra Mayukha Tiraskrta Candraruce
Prannata Suraasura Maulimannisphura Damshula Sannakha Candraruce
Jitakanakaacala Maulimadorjita Nirbhara Kun.jara Kumbhakuce
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 15 ||

15. You set at nought even the splendour of the moon with the charm of your reddish body, black locks of hair and the yellow robe worn around the waist, whose toe-nails shine with the resplendence of the gems in the crowns of the gods and asuras who prostrate before You, whose high breasts quiver as if by the force of the torrents of water flowing down from the summits of the Meru mountain which was conquered by Lord
Siva, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



विजितसहस्रकरैक सहस्रकरैक सहस्रकरैकनुते
कृतसुरतारक सङ्गरतारक सङ्गरतारक सूनुसुते ।
सुरथसमाधि समानसमाधि समाधिसमाधि सुजातरते ।
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १६ ॥

Vijitasahasrakaraika Sahasra Karaika Sahasrakaraikanute
Krtasura Taaraka Sanggarataaraka Sanggarataaraka Suunusute |
Surathasamaadhi Samaana Samaadhi Samaadhi Samaadhi Sujaatarate |
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 16 ||

16. You who by Your splendour defeat even the sun with thousands of rays, You who are prostrated to by the sun god with his thousands of rays, You who were praised by the son of Tarakasura after that asura was killed by Your son Lord Subrahmanya in the battle between the gods and Tarakasura when the gods were defeated, You who were pleased with the chanting of mantras by the royal sage Suratha and the Vaisya named Samadhi who was himself like samadhi and who prayed for nirvikalpa samadhi, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



पदकमलं करुणानिलये वरिवस्यति योऽनुदिनं सुशिवे
अयि कमले कमलानिलये कमलानिलयः स कथं न भवेत् ।
तव पदमेव परम्पदमित्यनुशीलयतो मम किं न शिवे
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १७ ॥

Padakamalam Karunnaanilaye Varivasyati Yonudinam Sushive
Ayi Kamale Kamalaanilaye Kamalaanilayah Sa Katham Na Bhavet |
Tava Padameva Parampadamityanushiilayato Mama Kim Na Shive
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 17 ||

17. Whoever constantly worships Your lotus feet, You who are the abode of compassion and who are auspiciousness itself, he will certainly be endowed with all prosperity. O Goddess Parvati, I who always meditate on Your lotus feet looking upon them as my ultimate refuge will certainly get it. O Goddess Lakshmi, who bestow everything on devotees, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



कनकलसत्कलसिन्धुजलैरनुषिञ्चति तेगुणरङ्गभुवम्
भजति स किं न शशीकुचकुम्भतटीपरिरम्भसुखानुभवम् ।
तव चरणं शरणं करवाणि नतामरवाणि निवासि शिवम्
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १८ ॥

Kanakalasatkala Sindhujalairanussin.cati Te Gunnaranggabhuvam
Bhajati Sa Kim Na Shashiikuca Kumbha Tattiiparirambha Sukhaanubhavam |
Tava Carannam Sharannam Karavaanni Nataamaravaanni Nivaasi Shivam
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 18 ||

18. Whoever sprinkles the sacred precincts of Your abode with water from a golden pot will attain the position of Indra by Your grace. O consort of Lord Siva, I take refuge at Your holy feet. Deign to bless me
with all prosperity, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



तव विमलेन्दुकुलं वदनेन्दुमलं सकलं ननु कुलयते
किमु पुरुहूतपुरीन्दु मुखी सुमुखीभिरसौ विमुखीक्रियते ।
मम तु मतं शिवनामधने भवती कृपया किमुत क्रियते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ १९ ॥

Tava Vimalendukulam Vadanendumalam Sakalam Nanu Kulayate
Kimu Puruhuutapuriindu Mukhii Sumukhiibhirasau Vimukhiikriyate |
Mama Tu Matam Shivanaamadhane Bhavatii Krpayaa Kimuta Kriyate
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 19 ||

19. Whoever repeatedly meditates on Your divine face adorned by the crescent moon, will he ever be rejected by beautiful women like those in Indra’s abode? O most valued treasure of Siva, why do You not fulfill my wishes, You who have charming locks of hair, O Daughter of the Mountain, hail unto You, hail unto You.



अयि मयि दीन दयालुतया कृपयैव त्वया भवितव्यमुमे
अयि जगतो जननी कृपयासि यथासि तथानुमितासिरते ।
यदुचितमत्र भवत्युररीकुरुतादुरुतापमपाकुरुते
जय जय हे महिषासुरमर्दिनि रम्यकपर्दिनि शैलसुते ॥ २० ॥

Ayi Mayi Diina Dayaalutayaa Krpayaiva Tvayaa Bhavitavyamume
Ayi Jagato Jananii Krpayaasi Yathaasi Tathaanumitaasi Rate |
Yaducitamatra Bhavatyurarii Kurutaadurutaapamapaakurute
Jaya Jaya He Mahissaasuramardini Ramyakapardini Shailasute || 20 ||

20. O Goddess Uma, deign to bestow on me also Your compassion, You who are always inclined to shower compassion on the weak, O Goddess Rama, may You be hailed as the Mother of the universe. You are my mother also. I too am Your son. You may reject my prayer if it is not proper. Deign to remove my sorrow.


Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

Subramanian.R

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2010, 01:22:02 PM »



Dear silentgreen,

Wonderful translation and beautiful pictures of Mother.  In this
Dasara week, this is a very essential post.

Mahishasura is our ego.

Sumba and Nisumba are our disease and death.

Chanda and Musunda are our karma and maya.

Dhumralochana is our lustful eyes, which is the prime among the
five senses to cause sinful acts.

Raktabhija is our blood, every drop of which is the cause of sinful acts.

Mahakali should vanquish all these and remain as Suddha Maya
in our mind to invite Siva for staying in our Heart.  It is she who
should give pure intellect to eschew the evils and attain our real
nature.

Ya devi sarva bhuteshu buddhi rupene samsthitha....

She should give us thirst and appetite for self realization.

Ya devi sarva bhuteshu thrushna rupena samsthitha...

Ya devi sarva bhuteshu kshudha rupena samsthitha....

Kalyanyai pranatham vruddhyai siddhyai kurmo namo namah:
Nairrudhyai bhoobrutham, lakshmyai sarvanyai the namo namah:


Thanks once again, silentgreen,



Arunachala Siva.

silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2010, 09:19:04 AM »
Dear Subramanian.R,

Nice information on Devi Mantra...the thirst for Self-realization.
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

silentgreen

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Shriisuktam
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2010, 09:20:01 AM »
श्रीसुक्तम्: ॐ   हिरण्यवर्णां   हरिणीं   सुवर्णरजतस्त्रजाम्
Shriisuktam: Om Hirannyavarnnaam Harinniim Suvarnnarajatastrajaam

Translated by Swami Krishnananda


Devi Lakshmi


ॐ   हिरण्यवर्णां   हरिणीं   सुवर्णरजतस्त्रजाम्   ।
चन्द्रां   हिरण्मयीं   लक्ष्मीं   जातवेदो   म   आ   वह   ॥१॥

Om Hirannyavarnnaam Harinniim Suvarnnarajatastrajaam |
Candraam Hirannmayiim Lakssmiim Jaatavedo Ma Aa Vaha ||1||

तां   म   आ   वह   जातवेदो   लक्ष्मीमनपगमिनीम्   ।
यस्यं   हिरण्यं   विन्देयं   गामश्वं   पुरुषानहम्   ॥२॥
     
Taam Ma Aa Vaha Jaatavedo Lakssmiimanapagaminiim |
Yasyam Hirannyam Vindeyam Gaamashvam Purussaanaham ||2||

Invoke for me, O Agni, the Goddess Lakshmi, who shines like gold, yellow in hue, wearing gold and silver garlands, blooming like the moon, the embodiment of wealth. O Agni! Invoke for me that unfailing Lakshmi, being blessed by whom I shall win wealth, cattle, horses and men.



अश्वपूर्वां   रथमध्यां   हस्तिनादप्रमोदिनीम्   ।
श्रियं   देवीमुप   ह्वये   श्रीर्मा   देवी   जुषताम्   ॥३॥

Ashvapuurvaam Rathamadhyaam Hastinaadapramodiniim |
Shriyam Deviimupa Hvaye Shriirmaa Devii Jussataam ||3||

कां   सोस्मितां   हिरण्यप्राकारामार्द्रां   ज्वलन्तीं   तृप्तां   तर्पयन्तीम्   ।
पद्मेस्थितां   पद्मवर्णां   तामिहोप   ह्वये   श्रियम्   ॥४॥

Kaam Sosmitaam Hirannyapraakaaraamaardraam Jvalantiim Trptaam Tarpayantiim |
Padmesthitaam Padmavarnnaam Taamihopa Hvaye Shriyam ||4||

I invoke Shri (Lakshmi), who has a line of horses in front of her, a series of chariots in the middle, who is being awakened by the trumpeting of elephants, who is divinely resplendent. May that divine Lakshmi grace me. I hereby invoke that Shri (Lakshmi) who is an embodiment of Absolute Bliss; who is of pleasant smile on her face; whose lustre is like that of burnished gold; who is wet, as it were, (just from the milky ocean), who is blazing with splendour, and is the embodiment of the fulfilment of all wishes; who satisfies the desires of her votaries; who is seated on the lotus and is beautiful like the lotus.



चन्द्रां   प्रभासां   यशसा   ज्वलन्तीं   श्रियं   लोके   देवजुष्टामुदाराम्   ।
तां   पद्मिनीमीं   शरणं   प्र   पद्ये   अलक्ष्मीर्मे   नश्यतां   त्वां   वृणो   ॥५॥

Candraam Prabhaasaam Yashasaa Jvalantiim Shriyam Loke Devajussttaamudaaraam |
Taam Padminiimiim Sharannam Pra Padye Alakssmiirme Nashyataam Tvaam Vrnno ||5||

आदित्यवर्णे   तपसोऽधि   जातो   वनस्पतिस्तव   वृक्षोऽथ   बिल्वं   ।
तस्य   फलानि   तपसा   नुदन्तु   या   अन्तरा   याश्च   बाह्या   अलक्ष्मीं   ॥६॥

Aadityavarnne Tapasodhi Jaato Vanaspatistava Vrkssotha Bilvam |
Tasya Phalaani Tapasaa Nudantu Yaa Antaraa Yaashca Baahyaa Alakssmiim ||6||

For shelter in this world, I resort to that Lakshmi who is beautiful like the moon, who shines bright, who is blazing with renown, who is adored (even) by the gods, who is highly magnanimous, and grand like the lotus. May my misfortunes perish. I surrender myself to Thee. O Thou, resplendent like the Sun! By Thy power and glory have the plants, (like) the bael tree, grown up. May the fruits thereof destroy through Thy Grace all inauspiciousness rising from the inner organs and ignorance as well as from the outer senses.



उपैतु   मां   देवसखः   कीर्तिश्च   मणिना   सह   ।
प्रादूर्भूतोऽस्मि   राष्ट्रेऽस्मिन   किर्तिमृद्धिं   ददातु   मे   ॥७॥

Upaitu Maam Devasakhah Kiirtishca Manninaa Saha |
Praaduurbhuutosmi Raassttresmina Kirtimrddhim Dadaatu Me ||7||

क्षुप्तिपासामलां   ज्येष्ठामलक्ष्मीं   नाशयाम्यहम्   ।
अभुतिमसमृध्दि   च   सर्वां   निर्णुद   मे   गृहात्   ॥८॥

Kssuptipaasaamalaam Jyesstthaamalakssmiim Naashayaamyaham |
Abhutimasamrdhdi Ca Sarvaam Nirnnuda Me Grhaat ||8||

O Lakshmi! I am born in this country with the heritage of wealth. May the friend of the Lord Siva (Kubera) and Kirti (fame) come to me. May these (having taken their abode with me) bestow on me fame and prosperity. I shall destroy the elder sister of Lakshmi, the embodiment of inauspiciousness and such evil as hunger, thirst, and the like. O Lakshmi! Drive out from my abode all misfortune and poverty.



गन्धद्वारं   दुराधर्षां   नित्यपुष्टां   करिषिणीम्   ।
ईश्वरीं   सर्वभूतानां   तामिहोप   ह्वये   श्रियम्   ॥९॥

Gandhadvaaram Duraadharssaam Nityapussttaam Karissinniim |
Iishvariim Sarvabhuutaanaam Taamihopa Hvaye Shriyam ||9||

मनसः   काममाकूतिं   वाचः   सत्यमशीमहि   ।
पशूनां   रुपमन्नस्य   मयि   श्रीः   श्रयतां   यशः   ॥१०॥

Manasah Kaamamaakuutim Vaacah Satyamashiimahi |
Pashuunaam Rupamannasya Mayi Shriih Shrayataam Yashah ||10||

I invoke hereby that Lakshmi (Shri), whose (main) avenue of perception is the odoriferous sense (i.e., who abides mainly in cows); who is incapable of defeat or threat from anyone; who is ever healthy (with such virtuous qualities as truth); whose grace is seen abundantly in the refuse of cows (the cows being sacred); and who is supreme over all created beings. O Lakshmi! May we obtain and enjoy the fulfilment of our desires and our volitions, the veracity of our speech, the wealth of cattle, the abundance of varieties of food to eat! May prosperity and fame reside in me (thy devotee)!



कर्दमेन   प्रजा   भूता   मयि   सम्भव   कर्दम   ।
श्रियं   वासय   मे   कुले   मातरं   पद्ममालिनीम्   ॥११॥

Kardamena Prajaa Bhuutaa Mayi Sambhava Kardama |
Shriyam Vaasaya Me Kule Maataram Padmamaaliniim ||11||

आपः   सृजन्तु   स्त्रिग्धानि   चिक्लित   वस   मे   गृहे   ।
नि   च   देवीं   मातरं   श्रियं   वासय   मे   कुले   ॥१२॥

Aapah Srjantu Strigdhaani Ciklita Vasa Me Grhe |
Ni Ca Deviim Maataram Shriyam Vaasaya Me Kule ||12||

Lakshmi! You have progeny in Kardama. (Hence) O Kardama, may you reside in me. Make Mother Shri with garlands of lotuses, to have Her abode in my (ancestral) line. May the (holy) waters create friendship (they being of an adhesive nature). O Chiklita (Progeny of Shri), reside in my home; and arrange to make Divine Mother Shri to stay in my lineage!



आर्द्रां   पुष्करिणीं   पुष्टिं   पिङ्गलां   पद्ममालिनीम्   ।
चन्द्रां   हिरण्मयीं   लक्ष्मीं   जातवेदो   म   आ   वह   ॥१३॥

Aardraam Pusskarinniim Pussttim Pinggalaam Padmamaaliniim |
Candraam Hirannmayiim Lakssmiim Jaatavedo Ma Aa Vaha ||13||

आर्द्रां   यः   करिणीं   यष्टिं   सुवर्णां   हेममालिनीम्   ।
सूर्यां   हिरण्मयीं   लक्ष्मीं   जातवेदो   म   आ   वह   ॥१४॥

Aardraam Yah Karinniim Yassttim Suvarnnaam Hemamaaliniim |
Suuryaam Hirannmayiim Lakssmiim Jaatavedo Ma Aa Vaha ||14||

Invoke for me, O Agni, Lakshmi who shines like gold, is brilliant like the sun, who is powerfully fragrant, who wields the rod of suzerainty, who is of the form of supreme rulership, who is radiant with ornaments and is the goddess of wealth. Invoke for me, O Agni, the Goddess Lakshmi who shines like gold, blooms like the moon, who is fresh with anointment (of fragrant scent), who is adorned with the lotuses (lifted up by celestial elephants in the act of worship), who is the presiding deity of nourishment, who is yellow in colour, and who wears garlands of lotuses.



तां   म   आ   वह   जातवेदो   लक्ष्मीमनपगामिनीम्   ।
यस्यां   हिरण्यं   प्रभुतं   गावो   दास्योऽश्वान्   विन्देयं   पूरुषानहम्   ॥१५॥

Taam Ma Aa Vaha Jaatavedo Lakssmiimanapagaaminiim |
Yasyaam Hirannyam Prabhutam Gaavo Daasyoshvaan Vindeyam Puurussaanaham ||15||

Invoke for me, O Agni, that Goddess Lakshmi who is ever unfailing, being blessed by whom I shall win wealth in plenty, cattle, servants, horses, and men.



यः   शूचिः   प्रयतो   भूत्वा   जुहुयादाज्यमन्वहम्   ।
सूक्तं   पञ्चदशर्चं   च   श्रीकामः   सततं   जपेत्   ॥१६॥

Yah Shuucih Prayato Bhuutvaa Juhuyaadaajyamanvaham |
Suuktam Pan.cadasharcam Ca Shriikaamah Satatam Japet ||16||

We commune ourselves with the Great Goddess, and meditate on the Consort of Vishnu. May that Lakshmi direct us (to the Great Goal).

Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

Subramanian.R

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2010, 11:13:07 AM »



Dear silentgreen,

Excellent explanation on Sri Suktam.  Sri refers to wealth, not merely
wealth in the meaning of riches, but also wealth of knowledge, and
wealth of good conduct, and wealth of good health and ultimate wealth viz., liberation.

There is one Sakti Mahimna Stotram by Maharshi Durvasa.  It contains
61 slokas, the first one being benediction, the next 51 slokas referring to Sakti pitas and the last 9 by way of Palasruti.

The Verse 27 says:

Atmasou sakalendriyachraya mano buddhyadhibi sochita
Karma baddha thanur janincha maranam prythithi yathkaranam |
Thathe devi mahavilasa lahari dhivyayudhanaam jayas
Thasmas sadguru mabyuphethya kalayettvameva chen muchyathe ||

Devi! This Jivatma suffers due to all the indriyas, manas, buddhi etc., and attains all miseries; It is bound by this birth and this body and revolves in the wheel of births and deaths.  This suffering is due to your maha maya vilasam and all your divine weapons.  If you direct me to a enlightened Guru, I shall get liberated from this.  Please bless me.

Pasam is iccha sakti.  Ankusa is Jnana Sakti.  Bow and arrows -viz., sugarcane and flowers denote the concept of mind, and Jnanendriyas.  For an Ajnani this renders the bondage of samsara and for a Jnani this renders liberation.

Raga swarupa pachatya krodharaangujojvala
Mano rupeshu kodhanda pancha thanmaatra sayaka.
 
            - Sri Lalita Sahasranamam.

Thanks once again for the exposition of Sri Suktam.



Arunachala Siva.           

silentgreen

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Saraswati Stuti
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2010, 09:43:25 AM »
सरस्वति महाभागे
Sarasvati Mahaabhage


Devi Saraswati

सरस्वति महाभागे विद्ये कमललोचने ।
विद्यारुपे विशालाक्षि विद्यां देहि नमोस्तुते ॥

Sarasvati Mahaabhaage Vidye Kamalalocane |
Vidyaarupe Vishaalaakssi Vidyaam Dehi Namostute ||

O most auspicious Goddess of knowledge,
One with beautiful and big eyes that resemble the lotus petals,
O bestower of wisdom, Mother Sarasvati, kindly bless me with knowledge.
I salute you.




या   कुन्देन्दु   तुषार   हार   धवला
Yaa Kundendu Tussaara Haara Dhavalaa


या कुन्देन्दु तुषार हार धवला या शुभ्रवस्त्रावृता
या वीणा वरदण्ड मण्डितकरा या श्वेतपद्मासना ।
या ब्रह्माच्युत शङ्करप्रभृतिभिर्देवैः सदा पूजिता
सा मां पातु सरस्वती भगवती निःशेषजाड्यापहा ॥


Yaa Kundendu Tussaara Haara Dhavalaa Yaa Shubhravastraavrtaa
Yaa Viinnaa Varadanndda Manndditakaraa Yaa Shvetapadmaasanaa |
Yaa Brahmaacyuta Shangkaraprabhrtibhirdevaih Sadaa Puujitaa
Saa Maam Paatu Sarasvatii Bhagavatii Nihshessajaaddyaapahaa ||


Oh Goddess Sarasvathi, who is fair as a jasmine flower, the moon or a snow flake, who is dressed in white and whose hands are adorned by veena, who is seated in a white lotus, to whom Brahma, Vishnu and Maheshwara pray, please protect us.
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

Subramanian.R

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2010, 10:37:05 AM »

Dear silentgreen,

Excellent.

Saraswati is white in colour, like Jasmine flowers.  She wears
white saree.  And she is seated on a white lotus with Veena on hand.
Whiteness is symbolic of Knowledge, the highest knowledge, the
Self Knowledge.  She not only confers knowledge of arts and music
and scriptures, but also the highest knowledge of Atma Bodham.

Kalidasa who was a dunce and a fool, was given Sakti mantra
written by Saraswati on his tongue and he became a world known
poet.  Kumara gurupara, a born dumb, was given milk by a young
girl [Saraswati in disguise] inside a temple and he became a great
poet at the age of 5.  He sang Sakala Kala Valli Maalai and Kandar
Kali Venba in Tamizh.  He is from Sri Vaikuntam, near Tirunelveli.

[/b]

Arunachala Siva.

silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2010, 05:11:49 PM »
One must propitiate the Divine Mother, the Primal Energy, in order to obtain God's grace. God Himself is Mahamaya, who deludes the world with Her illusion and conjures up the magic of creation, preservation, and destruction. She has spread this veil of ignorance before our eyes. We can go into the inner chamber only when She lets us pass through the door. Living outside, we see only outer objects, but not that Eternal Being, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. Therefore it is stated in the purana that deities like Brahma praised Mahamaya for the destruction of the demons Madhu and Kaitabha.
Sakti alone is the root of the universe. That Primal Energy has two aspects: vidya and avidya. Avidya deludes. Avidya conjures up 'woman and gold', which casts the spell. Vidya begets devotion, kindness, wisdom, and love, which lead one to God. This avidya must be propitiated, and that is the purpose of the rites of Sakti worship.

-- Sri Ramakrishna
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

silentgreen

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Mother Kali
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2010, 02:38:28 PM »
Mother Kali


Keshav (with a smile): "Describe to us, sir, in how many ways Kali, the Divine Mother, sports in this world."

Sri Ramakrishna (with a smile): "Oh, She plays in different ways. It is She alone who is known as Maha-Kali, Nitya-Kali, Smasana-Kali, Raksha-Kali, and Syama-Kali.

Maha-Kali and Nitya-Kali are mentioned in the Tantra philosophy. When there were neither the creation, nor the sun, the moon, the planets, and the earth and when darkness was enveloped in darkness, then the Mother, the Formless One, Maha-Kali, the Great Power, was one with Maha-Kala, the Absolute.

Syama-Kali has a somewhat tender aspect and is worshipped in the Hindu households. She is the Dispenser of boons and the Dispeller of fear.

People worship Raksha-Kali, the Protectress, in times of epidemic, famine, earthquake, drought, and flood. Smasana-Ka1i is the embodiment of the power of destruction. She resides in the cremation ground, surrounded by corpses, jackals, and terrible female spirits. From Her mouth flows a stream of blood, from Her neck hangs a garland of human heads, and around Her waist is a girdle made of human hands.



After the destruction of the universe, at the end of a great cycle, the Divine Mother garners the seeds for the next creation. She is like the elderly mistress of the house, who has a hotchpotch-pot in which she keeps different articles for household use. (All laugh.)

Oh, yes! Housewives have pots like that, where they keep 'sea-foam',3 blue pills, small bundles of seeds of cucumber, pumpkin, and gourd, and so on. They take them out when they want them. In the same way, after the destruction of the universe, my Divine Mother, the Embodiment of Brahman, gathers together the seeds for the next creation. After the creation the Primal Power dwells in the universe itself. She brings forth this phenomenal world and then pervades it. In the Vedas creation is likened to the spider and its web. The spider brings the web out of itself and then remains in it. God is the container of the universe and also what is contained in it.



Is Kali, my Divine Mother, of a black complexion? She appears black because She is viewed from a distance; but when intimately known She is no longer so. The sky appears blue at a distance; but look at it close by and you will find that it has no colour. The water of the ocean looks blue at a distance, but when you go near and take it in your hand, you find that it is colourless.

The Master became intoxicated with divine love and sang:
Is Kali, my Mother, really black?
The Naked One, of blackest hue,
Lights the Lotus of the Heart. . . .


The Master continued: "Bondage and liberation are both of Her making. By Her Maya wordly people become entangled in 'woman and gold', and again, through Her grace they attain their liberation. She is called Saviour, and the remover of the bondage that binds one to the world."

Then the Master sang the following song in his melodious voice:
In the world's busy market-place, O Syama, Thou art flying kites;
High up they soar on the wind of hope, held fast by maya's string.
Their frames are human skeletons, their sails of the three gunas made;
But all their curious workmanship is merely for ornament.
Upon the kite-strings Thou hast rubbed the manja-paste of worldliness,
So as to make each straining strand all the more sharp and strong.

Out of a hundred thousand kites, at best but one or two break free;
And Thou dost laugh and clap Thy hands, O Mother, watching them!
On favouring winds, says Ramprasad, the kites set loose will speedily
Be borne away to the Infinite, across the sea of the world.


The Master said: "The Divine Mother is always playful and sportive. This universe is Her play. She is self-willed and must always have Her own way. She is full of bliss. She gives freedom to one out of a hundred thousand."

A Brahmo Devotee: "But, sir, if She likes, She can give freedom to all. Why, then, has She kept us bound to the world?"

Sri Ramakrishna: "That is Her will. She wants to continue playing with Her created beings. In a game of hide-and-seek the running about soon stops if in the beginning all the players touch the 'granny'. If all touch her, then how can the game go on? That displeases her. Her pleasure is in continuing the game. Therefore the poet said:
Out of a hundred thousand kites, at best but one or two break free;
And Thou dost laugh and clap Thy hands, O Mother, watching them!"


Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

silentgreen

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Re: Devi Mahatmya / Durga Saptashati / Chandi
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2010, 01:29:27 PM »
Though you reason all your life, unless you are established in Samadhi, you cannot go beyond the jurisdiction of Shakti. Even when you say, 'I am meditating', or 'I am contemplating', still you are moving in the realm of Shakti, within It's power.

It is as if the Divine Mother said to the human mind in confidence, with a sign from Her eye, 'Go and enjoy the world'. How can one blame the mind?
The mind can disentangle itself from worldliness if, through Her grace, She makes it turn toward Herself. Only then does it become devoted to the Lotus Feet of the Divine Mother.

In response to a question from Mahima about 'something holding us back' from spiritual progress:
"Why? Cut the reins. Cut them with the sword of God's name. 'The shackles of kala, time, are cut by Kali's name.'"

--- Sri Ramakrishna
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...