Author Topic: Important self-enquiry quotes  (Read 8395 times)

amiatall

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Re: Important self-enquiry quotes
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2011, 06:49:24 PM »

"Really Vichara begins when you cling to the Self and are already off the mental movement, the thought-waves." - Ramana Maharshi


This should not be forgotten. Because many seekers believe that atma-vichara is a mental practice or mental movement. But truly, true inquiry starts when mind is still.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Important self-enquiry quotes
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2011, 09:00:04 AM »



Dear amiatall,

Yes.  The process of asking oneself, 'For whom this thought?'
and 'If it is for me, then who am I?'.  With these, the mental
movements should stop.  Thereafter one should abide in the Self
with mind being quelled.  All mental movements are thoughts.
The Self transcends the thoughts.  Then the [pure]mind becomes
the Self.

Guru Vachaka Kovai Verse 88:

The form of the snake is not different from the thought of it.
When one studies the matter, is it not that thought which causes
the separate snake to be created in that rope, which sustains it as the cause of one's suffering, and which makes itself dissolve
[when the truth of the non-existence of the snake is realized]?



Arunachala Siva.   
 
 
 
 

snow

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Re: Important self-enquiry quotes
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2011, 03:23:08 PM »



Dear amiatall,

Yes.  The process of asking oneself, 'For whom this thought?'
and 'If it is for me, then who am I?'.  With these, the mental
movements should stop.  Thereafter one should abide in the Self
with mind being quelled.  All mental movements are thoughts.
The Self transcends the thoughts.  Then the [pure]mind becomes
the Self.

Dear Subramanian, according to Michael James, Muruganar and Sri Sadhu Om in self-enquiry we are not to verbally think these thoughts ("to whom these thoughts?" and "who am I?") but to seek the source of the 'I' that is of course consciousness. Especially Michael James has written extensively on this.

From Day by Day with Bhagavan.

Question:
How am I to deal with my passions? Am I to
check them or satisfy them? If I follow Bhagavan’s method
and ask, ‘To whom are these passions?’ they do not seem to
die but grow stronger
.

Bhagavan: That only shows you are not going about my
method properly. The right way is to find out the root of all
passions, the source whence they proceed, and get rid of that
.
If you check the passions, they may get suppressed for the
moment, but will appear again. If you satisfy them, they will
be satisfied only for the moment and will again crave
satisfaction. Satisfying desires and thereby trying to root them
out is like trying to quench fire by pouring kerosene oil over it.
The only way is to find the root of desire and thus remove it.


Question:
"Am I to concentrate on the thought ‘Who am I?’"

Bhagavan: "It means you must concentrate to see where
the I-thought arises. Instead of looking outwards, look inwards
and see where the I-thought arises."



Question:When I do this and cling to my self, that is, the `I'-thought, other thoughts come and go, but I say to myself `Who am I ?' and there is no answer forthcoming. To be in this condition is the practice. Is it so?

Ramana Maharshi :  This is a mistake that people often make. What happens when you make a serious quest for the Self is that the `I'-thought disappears and something else from the depths takes hold of you and that is not the `I' which commenced the quest.

--
"If the enquiry `Who am I?' were a mere mental Questioning, it would not be of much value. The very purpose of self-enquiry is to focus the entire mind at its source. It is not, therefore, a case of one `I' searching for another `I'. Much less is self-enquiry an empty formula, for it involves an intense activity of the entire mind to keep it steadily poised in pure Self-awareness."


Question: Am I to keep on repeating `Who am I?' so as to make a mantra of it?
Ramana Maharshi : No. `Who am I ?' is not a mantra. It means that you must find out where in you arises the `I'-thought which is the source of all other thoughts.


"To enquire `Who am I ?' really means trying to find out the source of the ego or the `I'-thought."

Subramanian.R

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Re: Important self-enquiry quotes
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2011, 03:34:39 PM »



Dear snow,

I agree with you.  Atma Vichara is not a question-answer drill.
However, Sri  Bhagavan says, in Who am I? that one should ask questions like these, either mentally or verbally.  These are basically for the beginner-seekers.

Question No. 10:

How will the mind become quiescent?

Answer of Sri Bhagavan:

By the inquiry 'Who am I?'.  The thought 'Who am I?' will destroy all other thoughts, and the like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre, it will itself in the end get destroyed.  Then there will arise Self - realization.   

Question No. 11:

What is the means of constantly holding on to the thought 'Who am I?'

Answer of Sri Bhagavan:

When other thoughts arise, one should not pursue them, but should inquire 'To whom do they arise?'  It does not matter how many thoughts arise. As each thought arises, one should inquire with diligence, 'To whom has this thought arisen?'  The answer that would emerge would be 'To me'.  Thereupon, if one inquires 'Who am I?', the mind will go back to its source,  And the thought that arose will become quiescent.  With repeated practice in this
manner, the mind will develop skill to stay in its source.....       



Arunachala Siva.

snow

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Re: Important self-enquiry quotes
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2011, 04:22:28 PM »
Dear Subramanian, I asked Michael James about this subject a while back and he replied.

Much of the confusion that exists in people's minds about whether or not we
should ask ourself questions such as 'who am I?' arises only as a result of
inadequate translations of Bhagavan Tamil words. He often used the verb *
vicari*, which means 'investigate', but in many books it is translated as
'enquire'. In English when we say 'enquire', we can mean either
'investigate' or 'ask', so when his words are translated as 'enquire "who am
I?"', many devotees have mistaken them to mean 'ask "who am I?"' whereas in
fact they mean 'investigate "who am I?"'
.

How can we investigate who or what I am except by scrutinising or attending
to 'I'. If Bhagavan had told us, 'Investigate what is written in this book',
we could not know what is written in it merely by asking ourself 'What is
written in this book?'. To know what is written in it, we must open it and
look inside. Likewise, to know what I am, we must open our heart and look
inside in other words, to know 'I' we must attend to 'I'. Therefore the
term *atma-vicara* or 'self-investigation' means only self-scrutiny or
self-attention, and it does not mean literally asking ourself anything.


It is only by thus attending to 'I' exclusively (that it, to the complete
exclusion of all other thoughts, including all verbalised thoughts such as
'who am I?') that we can know it as it is. The consciousness 'I' exists and
is experienced by us always  at all times and in all states  whereas
thoughts and words such as 'who am I?' are transient appearances that come
and go. How can any transient thought or word enable us to know ourself, the
eternal reality 'I am'?"


Quote
By the inquiry 'Who am I?'.  The thought 'Who am I?' will destroy all other thoughts, and the like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre, it will itself in the end get destroyed.  Then there will arise Self - realization.

In my understanding thoughts are not only verbal thoughts. It can also mean intention, (like the intention to seek the source of the 'I').

And Ramana said: "The way is subjective, not objective; so it cannot and need not be shown by another. Is it necessary to show anyone the way inside his own house?"