Author Topic: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta  (Read 1687 times)

matthias

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Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« on: September 08, 2010, 06:25:27 PM »
this is the first section of this very beautifull teaching of the buddha, please read it carefully....



Thus have I heard:

At one time the Enlightened One was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma, a market town of the Kuru people. There the Enlightened One addressed the monks thus: "Monks,"1 and they replied, "Venerable Sir!" Then the Enlightened One spoke as follows:

This is the one and only way, monks, for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, for the extinguishing of suffering and grief, for walking on the path of truth, for the realisation of nibbāna: that is to say, the fourfold establishing of awareness.2

Which four? Here, monks, a monk dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, 3 observing body in body, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing sensations in sensations, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mind in mind, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mental contents in mental contents, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter].4

And how, monks, does a monk dwell observing body in body?

Here a monk, having gone into the forest, or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty room, sits down cross-legged, keeps his body upright and fixes his awareness in the area around the mouth. With this awareness, he breathes in, with this awareness, he breathes out. Breathing in a deep breath, he understands properly:5 "I am breathing in a deep breath." Breathing out a deep breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a deep breath." Breathing in a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing in a shallow breath." Breathing out a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a shallow breath." In this way he trains himself: "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe in." "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe in," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself.

Just as a skilful turner or a turner’s apprentice, while making a long turn understands properly: "I am making a long turn," and while making a short turn, understands properly: "I am making a short turn," just so, the monk, breathing in a deep breath, understands properly: "I am breathing in a deep breath." Breathing in a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing in a shallow breath." Breathing out a deep breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a deep breath." Breathing out a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a shallow breath." In this way he trains himself: "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe in." "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe in," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself.

Thus6 he dwells observing body in body internally, or he dwells observing body in body externally, or he dwells observing body in body both internally and externally.7 Thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of passing away in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising and passing away in the body. Now his awareness is established: "This is body!"8 Thus he develops his awareness to such an extent that there is mere understanding along with mere awareness.9 In this way he dwells detached, without clinging towards anything in the world [of mind and matter]. This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing body in body.

etc.

silentgreen

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Re: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2010, 05:18:49 PM »
Dear Matthias,

Very nice. I think this is the core of mindfulness teaching.
By observing mindfully, the breathing and other activities, the subtle awareness behind all gross sensations is recognized.
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

matthias

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Re: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2010, 09:59:55 PM »
dear silentgreen

for me this sutta contains the "contemplative" aspect of buddhas teachings, its much longer then this short excerpt, but anyway when i read it for the first time, it just contained so much wisdom and touched me very deeply (existentially), and the wisdom is down to earth...

just a very clear explanation of mindfullness as you said.

I wanted to share this because it was a very important text for myself, so I thought maybe it could be benefitial for others too.


matthias

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Re: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2010, 06:25:58 PM »
this american monk explains the sutra in the best way I think. very clear and easy to understand, and his teachings seem to correspond with the words and meditaiton instrucitons of the buddha...

I incorperated it into my own meditaiton and it really makes a great differnce what this man has to say..

so maybe someone enjoys this too:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1525978068254054348#docid=-628726703199491936