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ramana_maharshi

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2010, 07:03:34 PM »
In theory you are right udai garu.

But somehow i dare to say that though we understand we cannot live it always i.e 100%

I feel As far as possible we need to strive for it hence scriptures suggest sravanam,mananam and niddhidyasanam.

In one way amiatall garu is also correct.

Controlling mind is not possible always and however how much extent we understand our scriptures and teachings.

Quote
Bg Gita Ch6 Text35

The Blessed Lord said: O mighty-armed son of Kunti, it is undoubtedly very difficult to curb the restless mind, but it is possible by constant practice and by detachment.

So sravanam,mananam and niddhidyasanam come in order wise.




« Last Edit: September 09, 2010, 09:57:07 PM by prasanth_ramana_maharshi »

ramana_maharshi

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2010, 01:01:02 PM »
well said udai garu. I agree with you.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2010, 10:09:14 AM »



Virtue and vice, pleasure and pain, are all mental states which
affect us only when we identify ourselves with the mind and 'think'
of ourselves as doers and enjoyers.

Bhagavan Ramana was the embodiment of this sloka 6.  Many virtuous people came to Him and many vicious people came to Him.  He never treated them with any difference.  For Him, they were all only Arunachala Swarupam.  Even with Perumal Swami, who created a lot of problems for Him,  He never had any harsh feelings.  When Perumal Swami finally became sick and confessed to Him:  "I shall
surely go to hell for all that I had done.  Please forgive me and save
me."  Bhagavan Ramana said: "Even if you go to hell, I shall be there with you, please do not worry."

Regarding pain and pleasure, again His own life in His body was a glorious example. In the early years, He could take only unsalted
ganji or cold rice generously mixed with water.  In later years, there were bhikshas for Him with 32 delicious dishes. Even this, He took
them by mixing everything in one lump and took two three lumps and finished His dinner!  Pain - what can be a better illustration than His
last one year.  He was living as if His left arm was something away
from Him!  Dr. Guru Swami Mudaliar said:  "This sarcoma pain should be really excruciating.  It is like planting a spindle into His wound
and rotating.  The pain would be as horrible as if a fast moving lorry
is running over your hand.  How this man bears all these pains?" 

He was the Seer of all and was ever free.  He had never had any
bondage of mind, body and the world.


Arunachala Siva.
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2010, 04:37:18 PM »



Yes.  Bhagavan Ramana has said in Verse 38 of Sad Darsanam -
Anubandham:

Without thinking of oneself as apart from others, without swerving
from one's true state, if one abides always in one's Self, who is
there alien to one?....


Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2010, 05:10:01 PM »



Dear srkudai,

I was trying to find out whether Bhagavan Ramana had said anything
about Ashtavakra Gita.  Unlike Ribhu Gita and Yoga Vasishta, this
scripture is hardly mentioned by Bhagavan Ramana but for one small
reference in Devaraja Mudaliar's Day by Day with Bhagavan.  This was
on the afternoon of 31st March 1945, when the Raja of Sivaghar in
Uttar Pradesh told Bhagavan that he had surrendered himself to
Bhagavan and Bhagavan should give him Jnana.....

The story of how Ashtavakra Gita came to be taught was being recounted in English, for the benefit of the above Raja and other
visitors.  After the story was read out, Bhagavan said: "Because
Brahma Jnana is not something external, which is somewhere far away where you can go and get it, you cannot say that it will take so long or so short a time to attain it.  It is always with you.  You are That.  The story of Ashtavakra Gita is intended to teach that for getting Brahma Jnana all that is necessary is to surrender yourself completely to the guru, to surrender your notion of "I" and "mine".  If these are surrendered, what remains is the Reality......


Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2010, 10:27:43 AM »



Dear srkudai,

Yes.  The bondage is self imposed.  Bhagavan Ramana said:
"If the thief is outside, you can lock the door.  But the thief is
already in your house.  What should you do?  You have to only
try hard to drive him out without any loss or damage to your possessions."

One more thing.  A relaxed and contented person cannot become
an enlightened person.  Such a relaxation and contentment can
only pave the way easy for self realization.

I am looking into Living By the Word of Bhagavan.  I shall let you
know about Ashtavakra Gita references there.


Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2010, 10:38:05 AM »



Dear srkudai,

I looked into Living By The Words of Bhagavan, by David Godman.

Bhagavan/Annamalai Swami were narrating the story of King Mahabali and his total surrender to Vamana.  At that time, they compared him with King Janaka.  In this context, Ashtavakra is being mentioned.

Ashtavakra Gita [Ashtakvakra Janaka Samvadam] has been rendered
from Sanskrit to Tamizh by Viswanatha Swami in 1937.  Several
reprints have come from Sri Ramanasramam. 

There, Viswanatha Swami mentions the following verses as the
most important [perhaps as mentioned by Bhagavan Ramana or
Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni].

I.15;  XV. 20;  XVIII.7; XVIII. 75;  VII.1;  II.8;  XII.16;
XVIII.85;  XVII.3; II.3


Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2010, 02:16:35 PM »



Dear srkudai,

Regarding Verse 8 of AVG, I think the following verses of GVK and
Padamalai will render further light:

Verse 736 of GVK:

Possessing invariability and the distinction of performing like the
Sun, all actions by its mere presence, reality pervades all activities
like a string that runs through the rosary beads.  Therefore, if a
person's mind remains steadfastly merged with that Reality, then, even if he performs many thousands of activities, he will not experience any mental anxiety at all by performing them. 

Verses 515, 516 and 1244:

A mind that has dissolved in the state of God, and ceased to exist,
will not be aware of any activity that needs to be performed.

Because, when the ego, which has the idea that it is the performer
of actions has been completely destroyed, the idea that something
needs to be accomplished ends.

Those who do not see anything as a duty that has to be done, will
attain the bliss of peace that yields limitless contentment.

Bhagavan Ramana has said:

The notion of duties that need to be done [kartavya] will not cease
as long as the sense of doership [kartrutva] exists in the heart.

Why do you become mentally agitated, blindly believing there are
things you have to to do [kartavya]?

The bondage called "duty" will cease [being known] as a delusion
caused by the ego, when the firm knowledge of reality is attained.


Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2010, 04:12:33 PM »



Dear srkudai,

I was going through Naishakarmya Siddhi of Sureswara, the oldest
disciple of Sri Sankara.  He touches these points of kartavya and kartrutva.

Sureswara says that ignorance, once overcome by right knowledge,
can never sublate knowledge. When right knowledge has sublated
ignorance, latent tendencies [vasanas or samsara] are produced
which in subsequent similar circumstances, arise up to prompt the
Seer to remember the Truth.

Action involves ignorance.  Without ignorance, there would be no life
in the world in the ordinary sense of that term.   To press home this point, Sureswara invokes the logical principles of co-presence and co-
absence [anvaya vyatireka]:  Given avidya, there is samsara.  Given the absence of avidya, there is the absence of samsara. 

Being tied to the terrible ocean of pain called samsara, birth follows death and death follows birth, inexorably and inevitably.  Ignorance [avidya] and action [karma] keep one tied to the wheel of existence.  The great statements of the Sruti are therefore to inform one as to the way to destroy this bondage.  The BU says:  When one is released from all the desires that bind the heart, then the mortals even here become immortal and realize Brahman.  Such a one is akarma, nishkarma and aaptakaama. 

According to advaita, karma is an indirect aid to liberation.  As such, action has an important role in the preparatory stages.  After performing nitya-naimittika karmas, an individual amasses much merit and has mind which has been made pure [chitta suddhi].  These karmas will also leave him, once the mind is turned inwards.  In a purified mind, there is no tendency to do even these actions.  Then one realizes the Truth and abides in It.


Arunachala Siva.                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2011, 01:38:32 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Nice that you have resumed the scripture. Sri Bhagavan said: The desire for liberation, mumukshatvam alone would do. One
should have such intense desire for liberation, as if he is running water, when his head is on fire, he says! One should run here
and there and seek a proper Sadguru to show the way. The only qualification is, intense desire for liberation coupled with treating
all the worldly pleasures as spit saliva. One is Vairagyam and the other is Vivekam.

Arunachala Siva.

ramana_maharshi

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Re: Ashtavakra Gita
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2011, 02:49:00 PM »
nice explanation udai garu and yes intense desire for liberation is the key.