Author Topic: Irangal - to show mercy  (Read 2936 times)

Nagaraj

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Irangal - to show mercy
« on: August 23, 2010, 12:34:40 PM »
This is one of the most moving hymns of Muruganar. He addresses his master thus:

"O Ramana, residing at Tiruvannamalai, Your fame has spread all over the world, In Your compassion You came and claimed me, but alas this sinner left your shade of protection and now I suffer in fiery anguish. O Boundless ocean of joy, recall me to your feet.

I have once again been caught in the maya of this world having left Your protection. Having once more fallen into the ocean of samsara, I beg You to save me. You forgave all my faults but once again I fell into the abyss of illusion. Now I cry out to You in anguish and fear. O Ramana who shines in the hearts of the wise, redeem me and give me refuge by saving me now!"



Salutations to Sri Ramana
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Irangal - to show mercy
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2010, 02:20:51 PM »


Dear Nagaraj,

Irangal in Tamizh means both sympathizing with some one or condoling the separation [including death] of someone.  It may
mean here both in Muruganar's poem.

If he sings that "he has once again fallen into the abyss of samsara" after Bhagavan Ramana's Maha Nirvanam, it is only euphemism. Muruganar had attained enlightenment even while during Bhagavan Ramana's life in the body.

Saint Manikkavachagar says in several Tiruvachakam songs that he was leading a dog's life and he was suffering in the world's illusion.  But this is again an euphemism.  He attained Self realization, even while in Tiru Perundurai, where Siva came as
a Brahmin Guru and conferred Pada Diksha.  The saint poet tells
in his first song, Siva Puranam:

Meyye un ponnadigaL kandu inRu veedutRRen....  (Line 32).

O the Truth, today I saw your golden feet  and attained liberation.

Bhagavan Ramana has also said that all the great Four Saints have indicated that they were Self realized even their first songs.



Arunachala Siva.
       

Nagaraj

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Re: Irangal - to show mercy
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2010, 04:58:00 PM »
The ways of mystics and beyond grasp, they leave behind nectar drops, which is divine food.

Like in marriages, when the plantain leaves are thrown out with some food, the dogs come and eat it with great relish. Similarly, these songs of the poet Jnani's are those plantain leaves, which are left behind, for us so that we can relish the divine food of Jnana and Bhakti

Salutations to Sri Ramana
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Irangal - to show mercy
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2010, 07:18:00 PM »


Dear Nagaraj,

The left overs of the leaf plates [Ucchishtam] of a Jnani, is amrutam, nectar.  So, we can consume them along with the dogs.  In this context, once Muruganar wanted to eat on the same leaf plate where Bhagavan Ramana had eaten.  For some years, devotees were doing that.  Later it was stopped.  But when Muruganar wanted the leaf plate of Bhagavan on that morning, others stopped him saying:

"The leaf plate had Mudaliar Patti's rice, a non brahmin.  So do not eat on that."


Muruganar felt bad.  He wrote a poem titled Sri Ramana Ucchishtam:

It runs somewhat like this:

The fellow who made four Vedas [Brahma] does not know how to give birth to a Jiva.  Why did he make me a brahmin?  He should have given birth to me, as a dog, so that I would have eaten
the left overs of Bhagavan's leaf plates at least!

I think this single poem is available in Sri Ramana Sannidhi Murai.       

Arunachala Siva.

ramanaduli

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Re: Irangal - to show mercy
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2010, 07:37:16 AM »
Dear Subramaniyan ji,


Saint Manikavachagar sang ANDHANAN AVADUM KATTI VANDU ANDAI.  Here does it mean andhanan means guru. Not ordinary brahmin. Or is there any different meaning for it. If so I request you to explain it.

They say KANDAVAR VIDADILLAI. VIDAVAR KANDA DHILLAI.   But in some places Manikavachagar sang the anubudi i.e.  He  sang about the perinbam.



Ramanaduli

Subramanian.R

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Re: Irangal - to show mercy
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2010, 09:50:15 AM »

Dear ramanaduli,

In the Verse 8 of Tiru PaLLi Ezhucchi, in Tiruvachakam, Saint Manikkavachagar, says the phrase, that you have mentioned.
Puranas say that Siva came as a Brahmin who is also a Guru,
to give him diksha.  This happened first in Tiruperundurai.  This
is a Siva temple in Pudukottai District almost near the sea. But
Saint Manikkavachagar says that Siva came to him in several places, as per his songs of Tiruvachakam. These should have happened, perhaps subsequently.

In Keerthi Tiru Ahaval, in lines 75-76, the saint says that Siva
came close to him in Tiruvidaimaruthur, near Kumbakonam, and
placed His legs on him.

Idai maruthu adhanil eenda irunthu,
Padimap Padam vaitha ap parisum....

Kandavar vindilai, vindavar kandilai, only means that those who
have realized [anubhuti] do not speak.  Those who speak, have
not realized.


Arunachala Siva.