Author Topic: Ramana Maharshi Explains Why Non-self Is Not Pleasing  (Read 1191 times)

ramana_maharshi

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Ramana Maharshi Explains Why Non-self Is Not Pleasing
« on: June 11, 2010, 08:21:39 AM »
Disciple: Is not the non-self also pleasing?

Master: No.

D.: Why not?

M.: Not by itself but only as an object of enjoyment for the individual self, the non-self is dear as husband, wife, child,wealth, home, pleasing unguents, sweet scents etc.

D.: Why are they said to be not pleasing by themselves?

M.: Should they be so, they must always remain so. At one time, one thing is pleasing and at other times, the same thing is nauseating.

D.: How?

M.: Take a woman, for instance. When the man is lustful,she is fancied to be pleasing; when he suffers from fever, she is not wanted; for a man grown desireless, she is of no interest at all. According to circumstances the same woman can be pleasing,unwanted, or of no interest. The same applies to all other objects of enjoyment. Thus the non-self cannot be pleasing.


Source: ADVAITA BODHA DEEPIKA

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ramana Maharshi Explains Why Non-self Is Not Pleasing
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 09:45:52 AM »

Atman is the dearest to all.  And Atman is ever pleasing, uninterruptedly.  But non-Self is not pleasing always.  In fact,
when I read some of the songs of Tamil Siddha poets,  I felt
sometimes why they should highlight the bad aspects of women,
making fun of all their body parts.  For example, one of them
has sung:  "I praised her that her nose is like gingely flower,
without knowing that her nostrils contain the flowing mucus...
I praised her lips that they are like kovvai fruit, (a red fruit),
without knowing that the mouth smells with dirt, saliva and gingivitis......"

I understood later that these saint poets have sung the women
in  manner, that causes revulsion, only to highlight the non-
pleasing self.

Even Arunagiri Natha has also sung in a similar manner, but not
like Siddha poets.

Arunachala Siva.