Author Topic: My Pilgrimage to Ramanasramam by Sri Atmakuri Govindacharyulu  (Read 1394 times)

ramana_maharshi

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The Upanishadic line: "Mind alone is the cause of bondage and liberation of men," rises from my heart and dances in the pathway of the mind. The method of practice here is only to let go of that oppressive spirit. Here we can for once at least experience the truth of Patanjali's aphorism: "Yoga is control of the modifications of the mind."

His Routine

Even at the first crow of the cock, the Sage leaves his bed and goes to the hill to answer the calls of nature. At four o'clock he is engaged in the routine of the day. The first thing the Sage does every day is to chop vegetables. Sometimes he himself prepares the morning meal. There is no conflict between jnana and daily work. Bodily labour is not degrading. To teach this truth about work is the Sage's motive.

When the first bell rings at five, the Sage is seated at ease upon the sofa. The disciples now begin to enter the hall, and as the cool morning breeze, charged with the light of dawn is lightly stirring, the Vedic recitation begins. The students of the Ashram school raise their voices with so much feeling and chant with such devotion that there is no one who will not be overcome by it. And for a time it is as though the Divine Mother of India's eternal spirituality dances before us. The ladies who had left the Ashram the previous night, now return. The Maharshi goes for his bath, and at half-past seven the bell rings. Together with the guests and inmates the Sage takes two rice-cakes and half a cup of coffee. After this he comes to the hall. The sadhakas engage in their sadhana before him. Some go about the work of the Ashram. The Vedic students attend to the work and worship of the temple, as the devotees come and receive the silent blessings and are satisfied.

Lunch will be over by noon, afternoon coffee by three. The Sage will be present in the hall from three till supper time at eight P.M. He goes out once towards the cowshed in the morning and once by the adjoining sadhus. garden in the afternoon to ease himself. So few are his movements. At five in the afternoon music begins from the radio in the hall. The songs of Tyagaraja, the poet, singer-bhakta, siddha, can be heard with enjoyment. The Sage is a lover of the fine arts. He is an aesthete who can appreciate the sweetness of music.

In the evening of the first day I offered him my composition, titled Govinda Ramayana. For a while he read it to himself here and there. Reading the prose colophon he remarked, "He too is of Parashara gotra." It seemed as though this Sage who has sprung from Parashara gotra was a little pleased at this. When I mentioned that my maternal gotra was also Bharadwaja, the same as his, a little further pleasure was visible. When I told him that I was putting the entire Ramayana in verse, I felt that the Sage blessed me.


Towards the evening there is the Vedic recitation once again. After this the devotees sing the praises of the Sage and his verses. For a while after supper the Sage is immersed in samadhi, his devotees with him. Such is the daily routine.

He Rules by Silence

I stayed for three days and only once or twice a day was his sweet voice heard. He rules all through silence only. I drew near that sea of love and prostrating said, "I take leave. Bless me." The Sage nodded his head in assent and blessing. He looked on me for once to my heart's content with his gracious countenance. Somehow my foot was unable to move back, arrested by the power of that stupefying arrow. I again prostrated. I felt he told me, "Now you may depart." I came out from the Sage's hall with peace in my heart. I said to myself, "I am blessed." I left the Ashram pondering the words of Bhavatrihari:

"When I knew a little I was blinded by pride as an elephant by rut, and my mind was covered over by the thought, 'I know everything'. But when through the company of the enlightened I learned little by little, then I found that I was a fool and the fever of my pride departed."

It seemed as though my heart had been graven with Bhavatrihari's lines:

"Some inner cause brings things together. Attachments are by no means grounded in external causes." The hairs of my body stood on end. With the silent words, 'I am thy servant,' I offered the great Sage my heartfelt adorations.

Source: http://www.arunachala.org/newsletters/2008/?pg=mar-apr#article.1

Subramanian.R

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Re: My Pilgrimage to Ramanasramam by Sri Atmakuri Govindacharyulu
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2010, 10:50:30 AM »

Dear prasanth,

I have read about Sri Atmakuri Govindacharyulu.  But I do not
know much about the Govinda Ramayana work.  If you could
do a brief translation of this work, the members of the Forum
will be benefited.

Arunachala Siva.

ramana_maharshi

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Re: My Pilgrimage to Ramanasramam by Sri Atmakuri Govindacharyulu
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2010, 12:15:17 PM »
Dear Subramanian Garu,

Unfortunately i myself donot know about Govinda Ramayana work.

I will try to enquire from other resources and let you all know if any luck.