Author Topic: What does Bhagavan mean to me?  (Read 5047 times)

Subramanian.R

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What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« on: April 26, 2010, 01:26:53 PM »
Wolter A. Keers writes in the Birth Centenary Volume of Bhagavan
(1980):

"What has Bhagavan meant to me, and what does He will mean to me?"  I find that it is impossible to give a neat answer to this
question.

The first thing, perhaps, is that He opened my heart.  Immediately
when I saw Him, even from a distance, I recognized that this was
what I had been looking for.  But when I say that this was 'radiating',
all-penetrating and all-overthrowing love striking me with the power
of lightning, I know that only those who had the same experience
will know what I mean.  To anybody else, this is all a verbiage, at
best, creating an image of someone very magnificent.

Inside and outside the ashrams in the world, crowds of people
put on their face saying, "Oh, how marvelous, such a Maharshi,
such a wonderful teaching."

Beware, let us face it.  In the eyes of common sense, an appearance
like Sri Ramana Maharshi is the embodiment of the most outrageous
and perhaps even dangerous lunacy that man could think of!

Well, Sri Ramana Maharshi was the Unimaginable, and therefore
the Indescribable.

Perhaps it is after all, not such a blessing to India that in that
country (and there is no country I love and respect more than
India), one can believe and say all the right things without being
locked up.  For it makes it possible to repeat the right words
and remain fast asleep.  But if you live in London or Melbourne
or Ottawa or Amsterdam, and you go to baker early in the morning
and you tell him, "Of course, I was never born!" and you repeat
it to the green grocer and to a policeman and to a doctor, I would
like to see how long you still roam about free in the streets of
such cities, (without being taken custody by police!).

It is perhaps not such an undivided blessing that the one whom
some of us regard as their master has become so accepted and
respected.  For to go to the Asramam and to read the Talks with
Ramana Maharshi, requires no guts these days.

But to see what He meant; that you, fool, are one big bankruptcy;
that.....

(Source: As indicated above) 

Arunachala Siva.

Joey_

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2010, 03:55:26 PM »
I found this from David Godman's interview on Nisargadatta Maharaj.



     "Then he glared at me (David) and added, 'Don't waste your time giving spiritual talks until you are enlightened yourself, until you know from direct experience what you are talking about. Otherwise you will end up like that Wolter Keers.'

     Wolter Keers was a Dutch advaita teacher who toured around Europe, giving lectures on advaita and yoga in at least three different languages. He was a very fluent and informative teacher and he used to come to see Maharaj regularly. Every time he came, Maharaj would shout at him, telling him he wasn't enlightened, and that he shouldn't set himself up as a teacher until he was. I got the message. I have never given a public talk since then.


And this is from Osho: "The crowd that surrounded Beedie Baba was also of the same quality... rickshaw wallahs waiting for their passengers, sitting by the side of Beedie Baba. And when he said he would not speak to anybody unless it was this Dutchman... So he spoke to the Dutchman, who has now compiled books on Beedie Baba. Now in India it is almost parrot-like, but to the Westerner it seems to be a tremendous revelation -- when Beedie Baba said, "Aham brahmasmi; I am God, I am that" the young Dutchman immediately wrote a book: I AM THAT! Because for the West, spirituality is a foreign affair, just as for the East, science is a foreign affair. !


I know that he is speaking aobut Wolter Keers, because he translated I Am That in dutch. So he seemed to be a good student of Nisargadatta until he proclaimed to be enlightened himself and Nisargadatta went ballistic over that.

Subramanian.R

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2010, 08:45:02 AM »
Dear Joey,

I read your post and noted the contents.  These anecdotes of
Nisargadatta Maharaj and Osho, I have not heard before.
For that matter, it was the practice of Nisargadatta to criticize
some of the devotees of Bhagavan Ramana.  I do not know why he should have done that. If you read how Wolter Keers laid his life, you will be surprised.

He lived in his home for some time.  (I do not know much about
his European tours as well).  He became silent.  He had only
Bhagavan's photo in his room.  One evening, he called his friends
for a tea.  When it was over, he said:  Okay, let me leave.  He
prostrated before Bhagavan's photograph and did not rise up!
This is again from David Godman.

Regarding Osho, I never want to react.  He had an aids-carrying
body, 364 Rolls Royces and zero self knowledge.  That is all
his achievements.  He spoke very badly about Ramana Himself.
Please read David Godman's one of the recent articles in his blog.         

Bhagavan Ramana has once said that when a seeker leaves his
body, after being unconscious and without combing back from
unconsciousness or coma, he would not have been liberated.
Nisargadatta left his body, after being unconscious for sometime,
without coming back to consciousness.  If it is blasphemy,  I am
sorry.

Arunachala Siva.

Joey_

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2010, 06:29:52 PM »
Hey, I agree with you about Osho (for the most part). I only quoted him because according to the quote it seemed that Nisargadatta saw great potential in Wolter Keers.

And Nisargadatta had enormous respect towards Bhagavan. He once said to Ganesan: "I never had a chance to prostrate to your great-uncle Ramana Maharshi, so I am prostrating to you instead. This is my prostration to him."
He also said that one of his few regrets in life was that he never met Bhagavan in person.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2010, 06:36:35 PM by Joey_ »

amiatall

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2010, 09:35:19 PM »
I wouldn't doubt nissargadatta and osho. I respect them the same way I respect Ramana. Remember, that one does not know what REALLY was going on. Books? Burn it. So much influence is being made before books or articles are released.

However
Quote
D.: Some say that Sri Sankaracharya was only intellectual and not realised. Is it so?

M.: Why worry about Sankaracharya? Realise your own Self. Others can take care of themselves

peace

amiatall

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2010, 08:08:05 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Regarding the presentation of Maharajs teachings
did you see the videos on youtube about Nisargadatta?
Please take a notice how Maharaj says a little bit of words and a translator translates it into 200 words. I saw the same words in the 'I AM THAT' book, which means Maharaj didn't write a book but a translator "did".
Now, we can doubt that and say that He Himself spoke through translator, but who really knows? Only those who understand the language in which Maharaj speaks can tell.

snow

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2010, 10:20:19 PM »
Quote
For that matter, it was the practice of Nisargadatta to criticize
some of the devotees of Bhagavan Ramana.

Nisargadatta seemed often harsh to people but it didn't matter at all to him wheter they were christians, jews, hindus, buddhists or devotees of Bhagavan.

snow

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Re: What does Bhagavan mean to me?
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2010, 10:32:44 PM »
Famous american Buddhist teacher Jack Kornfield described his experience with Nisargadatta Maharaj like this: "Being with Nisargadatta gave me the deepest experience that I have ever had, of closeness to a human being who was truly free. And that freedom was filled with love and aliveness and spontaneity and fearlesness and place of absolute stillness beyond all of that. He also said: "Part of what made it so extraordinary to be with Nisargadatta, was to be with someone who wanted nothing from you. I have never in my life been with other person who wanted less from me or anybody. And in that 'not wanting' there was a sense of tremendous freedom and tremendous love."


And this comes from a man who has met countless saints and sages and even spent time in Thailand's forest monastery with legendary Ajahn Chah.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2010, 10:38:09 PM by snow »