Author Topic: The essence of practice by Sadhu om  (Read 8442 times)

amiatall

  • Guest
The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« on: December 02, 2009, 03:37:32 PM »
Hello every each and one  :),

An urge has arisen to post some sayings by Sadhu Om (i feel i don't need to introduce him) on self-inquiry practice.

We should not give even the least room in our heart to the demonic ghost of forgetfulness (pramada),
which deludes the mind by diverting it from Self-attention.
Instead, with unhesitating and irresistible courage, we should victoriously attain Self-knowledge.

During sleep, when one does not rise as an individual who feels “I am this fleshy body”,
do any thoughts rise either about the world or about God?
Therefore, know that the tendency to identify a body as “I” alone is the cause for the appearance of the world and God.


                  The Thoughts That Arise During Meditation

Among a collection of many kinds of small seeds, it is impossible to detect and remove the thorn-seeds.
Only after all the seeds have sprouted in the form of plants is it possible to detect the thorn-plants, and thereby to pluck them out and throw them away.
Similarly, only if all the tendencies or vasanas which are hiding in the heart sprout out in the form of thoughts during the time of your meditation,
will it be possible to destroy them by the practice of Self-inquiry. Hence, the rising of thoughts during the time of meditation is good.

Note: Compare Maharshi's Gospel, Page 19, where Sri Bhagavan says: “Yes, all kinds of thoughts arise in meditation. That is only right; for what lies hidden in you is brought out. Unless it rises up, how can it be destroyed?”

The tendencies (vasanas) are the seeds, and the thoughts that rise are the plants.
The Grace of God or Guru is the water that makes the vasanas sprout in the form of thoughts. (here we can see how attention is itself a Light which lights up darkened corners of our minds)
Then in order to destroy those thoughts, which exist in the form of desires, that same Grace crushes them by the power of the clear discrimination that it bestows upon us.
Therefore, until you achieve victory in this war of Grace, do not become disheartened and give up your meditation.

All thoughts that we have cultivated due to our worldly desires in many former lives when we did not possess proper discrimination,
have been accumulated in our heart in the form of very powerful tendencies (vasanas).
Those vasanas exist in the form of likes and dislikes, and they will be destroyed only to the extent to which we abide firmly in the Self.

Note: Compare Who am I? (Nan Yar?), para-graph 10, where Sri Bhagavan says, “Although tendencies toward sense-objects (vishaya-vasanas), which have been coming from the ancient past, rise without limit like the waves of the ocean, they will all be destroyed when Self-attention (swarupa-dhyana) becomes more and more intense.”

                         How to Make Thoughts Subside

All thoughts (vrittis) arise only because the unreal feeling “I am this body” has become well soaked and firmly established in us.
All these thoughts will be destroyed only if we vigilantly practice Self-inquiry, and thereby root out the unreal feel-ing “I am this body.”

If we feel “I am this body,” thoughts either about the world or about God will immediately rise with great vigor and attachment.
Having risen thus, those thoughts will multiply and increase in the form of likes and dislikes, and intense misery will then result.

During sleep, when one does not rise as an individual who feels “I am this fleshy body”, do any thoughts rise either about the world or about God?
Therefore, know that the tendency to identify a body as “I” alone is the cause for the appearance of the world and God.

So long as any one of the three bodies is identified as “I,” it will be impossible to put an end to all the tendencies or vasanas, which are the seed-forms of thoughts.
Know that in order to put an end to all tendencies, any kind of effort other than the elevated practice (sadhana) of turning and attending to Self will be of no avail.

                   Intermittent Attempts

The state in which our power of attention, which now sees the objects that exist in front of our eyes, sees its own existence “I am”,
having suddenly become introverted by giving up all objective attention and turning towards “I,” is alone the state of true austerity (tapas) or yoga.
If our power of attention is used in any other way, that is only an objective attention that is opposed to true tapas or yoga.

Know that a vichari (a person practicing Self-inquiry) who makes effort with the liking always to turn inwards to see the “I” with the inner eye,
will not be able to experience the pure Self-consciousness merely by the process of sitting ma-jestically with closed eyes for a long period of time at one stretch.


If at one single attempt you strive persis-tently for long hours without limit,
to pull Selfwards and restrain the running mind without leaving your hold on Self-attention,
you will find that you are not able to maintain a steady intensity of Self-attention.
Therefore, after making one attempt for a few minutes, relax your effort for a while, and then again make a fresh attempt with renewed effort.

If you continue incessantly to struggle for many hours at a stretch to turn your power of attention towards Self,
your effort will become slack and the intensity of your Self-attention will decrease.
On the other hand, if you take rest as and when each attempt becomes slack,
and then if you repeatedly make fresh efforts to turn Selfwards, with each fresh attempt your Self-attention will gain an increased vigor and intensity.

Note: If we press our hand on a weighing-scale and if we try to maintain the pressure continuously for a long time by not removing our hand, as time passes the dial will indicate that the pressure is gradually decreasing. But if instead we relax by removing our hand for a while, and if we then again apply the pressure, the dial will indicate that with each fresh attempt the pressure is increasing. Similarly, instead of struggling to maintain the intensity of Self-attention for a long time, if we make intermittent attempts to turn our attention keenly towards Self, with each fresh attempt our Self-attention will gain a greater degree of intensity and clarity. (mind is like a muscle isn't it  :))

When the mind, our power of attention, having little by little gained the strength to turn Self-wards,
finally at one time reaches the heart due to the intensity and clarity of its Self-attention,
it will drown in Self, having been caught in the clutch of the Grace of God who has ever been waiting without the least forgetfulness to catch it,
and hence it will never again turn outwards to know objects other than “I”.

Knowing that this is indeed the peerless di-vine marriage of Grace, the power of attention will become settled and will attain firm abidance in Self.
To remain steadily established in Self-abidance, being firmly bound by Self in Self, having known one-self to be that Self, is alone the state of supreme bliss.

Source: Sadhanai Saram by Sri Sadhu Om


silentgreen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 753
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2009, 04:48:45 PM »
Dear amiatall,

Very nice. The regular intermittent effort is really useful.
The regular intermittent effort is found useful not only for self-enquiry but for many other practices. For example, when a student studies for an exam, sitting for long hours scrubbing a subject with a blank mind often results in loss of effort. On the other hand it is recommended that the student study intermittently with an alert mind. In the period of intermission the inner self processes the higher picture and the student finds many new ideas coming up and missing links solved.

However I also feel that the major breakthrough in both is when inner bliss is felt. After that things become smooth. When a student starts getting intellectual joy in seeing the connections within the various concepts, his studies become smooth. When the enquirer starts feeling the inner bliss, the enquiry becomes smooth. Inner bliss cannot emanate from the heart space until thought crusts have sufficiently melted and consciousness appears clear.

Thanks for the very nice post.

Victory to Arunachala Siva,
Victory to Sri Bhagavan.
Victory to Sri Sadhu Om.
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2009, 05:14:14 PM »
Dear amiatall,

Nice post.  The melting of thought-crusts is only chidda suddhi.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2009, 02:03:27 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Yes veiing power, the avarana, is the more difficult one to
conquer.  The projecting power, viksepa will be taken care
once the first conquest is over.  Viveka Choodamani also
says this only.

Arunachala Siva.

amiatall

  • Guest
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2009, 03:38:02 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Of course, this is obvious. But one should not linger "this is projection, this is veiling.." etc. We can discuss it here though, but one should admit that he/she has to abide in oneself unceasingly not giving any room for self-forgetfulness.
One has to abide persistently in 'I AM'. This is a "state" of non-waking but still not sleeping. That is all to be done. It is simple but yet difficult because vasanas has a great pull there.
What one should do is at least to be still on conscious level. It is not a matter of knowing it is matter of not knowing. Mere conviction is a tool only. (and a great one)
According to Sadhu Om (and others) Self realization happens in an instant, like waking from deep sleep happens in an instant, like death happens in an instant... so after abiding in first person consciousness 'I' for a prolonged time one may get a chance to transcend it.
But beware 'I AM' is a thoughtless state. The moment you think of something be sure that your attention went away or an effort of attention has slackened. It does not mean that one should stress the mind to the thoughtless state. It should be natural.


nonduel

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2009, 04:58:20 PM »
Namaste,

Sri Sadhu Om's books are the best one to explain Sri Ramana's teachings.

Amiatall's last post made me realize something. Quote:  "Mere conviction is a tool only."

Self-Enquiry isn't made of "parts". For example, one can't just be convinced and "do" nothing else. I understand the sadhana of Self-Enquiry as a "whole".

Abiding in the self with the bhavana of Tat Svam Asi with eagerness. This also implies that one surrenders the striving for outer means towards Realisation, which otherwise contradicts the belief Tat Svam Asi. Keeping thoughts of difficulties, unworthiness, Sri Ramana said to devotees that this was a major obstacle. When the sadhana starts to be complicated, one can be sure that it is the mind.

One last thought...conviction isn't a "tool" but an absolute faith in the Guru. Thus not a way, but a Being.

It has been often said that the Sadhana isn't a doing but a Being

Love
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2009, 05:22:31 PM »
Dear nonduel,

Yes.  The self enquiry is a wholesome process.  There are twin
tools, Conviction and Contemplation.  Sraddha and Sravana.
Sri Sankara says:  "My Guru said Sivoham, Sivoham.  I am Siva,
I am Siva.  But I do not yet become Siva.  But I believe in my
Guru's words.  I continue the practice with Sraddha and Sravana."

Sri Sankara's Guru is Govinda Bhagavadpada, from Narmda
Valley.  His Guru in turn was Gaudapada, the famous author
of Gaudapada Karika, for Maandukya Upanishad.  It was Sri
Sankara's prarabdha to write a beautiful commentary on Gaudapada
Karika, which runs to about 200 verses.  This is the best verse book
on Nonduality, before Vivekachoodamani and Bhagavan Ramana's
Sad Darsanam.   

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2009, 07:37:00 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Yes.  All roads lead to Tiruvannamalai.  Sri Kavyakanta Ganapati
Sastri had said that Tiruvannamalai is a Sri Chakra (he is a Sakti
Upasaka) and there are nine roads to the bindu, the centre point
of Sri Chakra.  Bhagavan Ramana says in His prose work of
Vivekachoodamani that there are several sweetmeats differing
in colour but the sweetness is the same and His prose work is
one such sweetmeat.  In modern times, we can say that there
are several types of icecreams, chocolate, pista, strawberry and
vanilla, but the sweetness of the icecream is the same.  Perhaps,
some may contain some small nut pieces.

Arunachala Siva.   

nonduel

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2009, 08:15:04 PM »
Dear Skrudai,

Sri Annamalai and Sri Sadhu Om are saying the same thing, the same Truth. I could add Sri Nisargadatta who has helped me immensely in simplifying the teaching. It took much too many years for myself to arrive at the core, at the Heart of the teaching. Each added more comprehension with different words that eventually "rang a bell". Sri Sadhu Om's books exposed Sri Ramana's teaching in a very easy and understandable way.

At one point, everything comes together. The problem is that we have to use words to communicate and words are dual, only concepts, and subject to so many interpretations. Hence Sri Annamalai will resonate more with you because his choice of words are what you need to understand. Like stories; the rope and the snake, the 10 men (one missing), the beggar and the King. It isn't the story per-se, but the inner meaning that suddenly illuminate one's comprehension.

So many years, so many words, so many teachers....and finaly Peace in BEING!

Love!

Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

nonduel

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2009, 08:23:51 PM »
Dear Subramanian-ji,

Yes, yes! 
This is where the teaching becomes "baffling". The individual continues Sraddha and Sravana....but Siva isn't the do-er.  ;)

Dear nonduel,

Yes.  The self enquiry is a wholesome process.  There are twin
tools, Conviction and Contemplation.  Sraddha and Sravana.
Sri Sankara says: "My Guru said Sivoham, Sivoham.  I am Siva,
I am Siva.  But I do not yet become Siva.  But I believe in my
Guru's words.
  I continue the practice with Sraddha and Sravana."

Sri Sankara's Guru is Govinda Bhagavadpada, from Narmda
Valley.  His Guru in turn was Gaudapada, the famous author
of Gaudapada Karika, for Maandukya Upanishad.  It was Sri
Sankara's prarabdha to write a beautiful commentary on Gaudapada
Karika, which runs to about 200 verses.  This is the best verse book
on Nonduality, before Vivekachoodamani and Bhagavan Ramana's
Sad Darsanam.   

Arunachala Siva.
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

amiatall

  • Guest
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2009, 09:11:44 PM »
Dear srkudai,
This swami, that swami, is only because of individuality and this is GOOD because everyone can find their own in their ways. I feel your words but my posts are intended more for those who just come to read.
I feel that every one of us (who visits here often and interacts, one can count them on the fingers of a hand) understands what is and how it is but in order to understand each other we use our bundle of words, but it is the same. quote Nonduel: "The problem is that we have to use words to communicate and words are dual, only concepts, and subject to so many interpretations." (take into count that, i believe, english is not our native language too)

My biggest point that i want to stress through my posts which are intended especially for those who just look and don't post anything (newcomers): don't get deluded by mind.
Practice must be done, effort must be included, conviction must be there, wordless 'i am' must be understood from all its perspectives.
Why I stress this so much? I encounter many 'so called advaitities' nowadays that say 'oh, who has to practice what?' and they go do their job and THINK they got it. I could say for those, sorry, this 'business' does not work like this. The moment you get it, that moment you lose the meaning of it all.

So, we should make everything as simple as possible but NOT SIMPLER ;)
What i mean here? That if one wants to be done with this all he must even let go of the idea that 'i am the Self'. And as Maharaj said: To propagate concepts is easy indeed, but to drop them all is the difficult task.



nonduel

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2009, 10:13:24 PM »
Dear Amiatall,

My mother tongue is French.

I would like to express that one has to do his sadhana as HE UNDERSTANDS. It will change and evolve through time and as one's comprehension increases and deepens. It is always the SELF leading. In fact... there is ONLY BRAHMAN.

In other words, trust oneself. Truth is ONE, but can be presented and appear as many.

You are right in saying (quote):  "Why I stress this so much? I encounter many 'so called advaitities' nowadays that say 'oh, who has to practice what?' and they go do their job and THINK they got it."  That's the dichotomy one's has to see through. Tat Svam Asi and at the same time you have to do sadhana. You already ARE, have always BEEN and simultaniously DO sadhana. This is why I understand this as only BEING. It has been often said by all Sages.... it is not a doing but a being. Then one can also say that the being is a doing...See? This is inevitable in duality.

This forum is Sangha, Love.

Quote:  That if one wants to be done with this all he must even let go of the idea that 'i am the Self' Absolutely.


Love
Arunachala Siva
« Last Edit: December 03, 2009, 10:31:44 PM by nonduel »
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

silentgreen

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 753
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2009, 08:40:44 AM »
The attractions and aversions acts like "gum" to which karma (results of action) tend to stick.
So when an ordinary person does only a few activities, the consciousness gets loaded with karma. And hence Self-enquiry (or surrender) again has to be done to abide as the "free space being". For the spiritually developed, there is very little "gum". So even after doing lot of activities, the consciousness remains clear as ever (or clears itself up automatically) and abidance as "free space being" continues. For very highly developed, the world is a movie created by God.
Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...

matthias

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2009, 09:04:14 PM »
I read a very nice thing in one of the transcipts of tulku urgyen rinpoche (a dzogchen master o four time)

he said somthing like it is a great danger to mix up view and conduct as a great perfection practicioner

and this means that allthough you have transmisison of the view, you know and have an insight into the true nature of things....you should not change your conduct...this means that you should not start acting like a dzogchen yogi, who is totally free of moral conditioning, just because a master told you and showed you who you really are.

you should start with the highest view, dzogchen, mahamudra, madhyamaka or advaita or however it is called

and the lowest conduct...this of a hinayana buddhist, not harming other, not liing etc..then move on to become a bodhisattva in conduct: benefit other etc.

without loosing your view... their is no contradiciton in this...

and as you both said: just thinking//Acting like "Iam a Buddha" is a bad thing...it is called the "great lie" in tibetan buddhism and is regarded as a great sin with lots of negativ karmic results...

much love
matthias

nonduel

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
    • View Profile
Re: The essence of practice by Sadhu om
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2009, 09:19:30 PM »
Dear Matthias,

Quote:  ""just thinking//Acting like "Iam a Buddha" is a bad thing...it is called the "great lie""

Tat Svam Asi, I Am That I Am, I Am Brahman...isn't refering to the body.

Arunachala Siva
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.