Author Topic: 9. What is the path of inquiry for understanding the nature of the mind?  (Read 8087 times)

SANKAR

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Re: 9. What is the path of inquiry for understanding the nature of the mind?
« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2008, 06:20:06 AM »
Dear DRPVSSNRAJU, I've got a question concerning the last line of your post which is :
Self remembrance means uninterrupted self attentiveness but not a mechanical repitition of a particular word or mantra using the mind.

The first half of the sentence corresponds with :
If one inquires as to where in the body the thought ‘I’ rises first, one would discover that it rises in the heart.

The second half of the sentence doesn't tally with :
Even if one thinks constantly ‘I’ ‘I’, one will be led to that place.

The repeating of 'I' 'I' 'I'...... is mechanical but by doing it other thoughts are kept out and so it becomes concentration. I believe that will get me closer to the Self.

Are you sure about the second half of the last sentence.

Paul.
 



Dear paul

I think the repeatition of thought will take you near to the self. But one has to be selfless, Egoless, Harmless, Compassionate, Merciful and Beautiful human in nature first then only any one can enter into the self permanantly. Without it dipping in water and coming out of water is of what use. The purpose of life is to remain init permanantly and doing everything without doership.

Siva siva arunachala
KANNAN MEERA SANKAR

DRPVSSNRAJU

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Re: 9. What is the path of inquiry for understanding the nature of the mind?
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2008, 02:52:11 PM »
Dear DRPVSSNRAJU, I've got a question concerning the last line of your post which is :
Self remembrance means uninterrupted self attentiveness but not a mechanical repitition of a particular word or mantra using the mind.

The first half of the sentence corresponds with :
If one inquires as to where in the body the thought ‘I’ rises first, one would discover that it rises in the heart.

The second half of the sentence doesn't tally with :
Even if one thinks constantly ‘I’ ‘I’, one will be led to that place.

The repeating of 'I' 'I' 'I'...... is mechanical but by doing it other thoughts are kept out and so it becomes concentration. I believe that will get me closer to the Self.

Are you sure about the second half of the last sentence.

Paul.
 

Dear Paul,
             Namasthe.
                           Thinking is an act of directing our attention towards something that appears other than our self.But we not other than our "self".
So thinking of even self takes us away from self.Thinking is doing.We cannot stop all our mental activity by some other kind of mental activity.
Repeating anything brings mechanistic silence and seeming subsidence of mind.But this not we are aiming for.We must be aware all the time then
the self attention blossoms into true experience of self-consciousness.If we have to repeat "I" "I" with the mind which is a product of self-ignorance
in order to attain self-knowledge mechanically without awareness we will land in seeming subsidence of mind but not subsidence which is a byproduct
of self awareness.Thinking is doing,where as awareness is being.It is only awareness that takes us to core of our self conscious being.
Bhagawan suggested repitition only for those who fail to be self-attentive all the time.Repitition helps to prepare the mind for self-enquiry
but cannot lead to self-knowledge.
pvssnraju

nonduel

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Re: 9. What is the path of inquiry for understanding the nature of the mind?
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2008, 04:19:52 PM »
I think that the repetition of "I" "I" "I", or name, is helpfull in keeping and returning the mind within at the "I-thought". Thus it will lead to the Self. But in my understanding, it is not to be repeated like a parrot constantly, but more a "trick" to help one return to Self-Attention. Otherwise it will become meaningless. Saying and repeating a few times "I" calms down the mind and helps to return at the source of the "I".

It is the same with enquiry, it is not to repeat constantly "Who Am I?" etc. but to put the attention on the self, the "I-thought". Then one dwelves in the "I Am".

Otherwise the practices becomes only mechanical. To do it a couple of times, with attention, calms and one sinks at the source.
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

Subramanian.R

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Re: 9. What is the path of inquiry for understanding the nature of the mind?
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2008, 08:31:10 PM »
Dear DRPSSVN Raju, this is what Bhagavan has said in
Who am I?  When He said, think "I-I-I", it is not
mechanical repetition, but a 'bhavana' or conviction
or an attitude.  It is not mouthing of the word but
the deeper meditative contemplation.

Arunachala Siva.