Author Topic: Karma Yoga and the Self enquiry - 2  (Read 1133 times)

Subramanian.R

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Karma Yoga and the Self enquiry - 2
« on: June 17, 2009, 02:04:30 PM »
The questioner continued.

Q: That means 'realize the Self.'  Does my realization help
others?

Bhagavan:  Yes, and it is the best help that you can possibly
render to others.  But really there are no others to be helped.
For the realized being sees only the Self, just as the goldsmith
sees only the gold while valuing it in various jewels made of
gold.  When you identify yourself with the body, name and form are there.  But when you transcend the body-consciousness,
the others also disappear.  The realized one does not see the
world as different from himself.

Question:  Would it not be better if saints mixed with other
people in order to help them?

Bhagavan:  There are no others to mix with.  The Self is the
only reality.
           
                                        - Maharshi's Gospel.

The Sage helps the world merely by being the real Self. 
The best way for one is to serve the world is to win the
egoless state.  If you are anxious to help the world, but
think that you cannot do so by attaining the egoless state,
then surrender to God all the world's problems, along with
your own!

                                            - Maha Yoga.

Question:  Should I not try to help the suffering world?

Bhagavan:  The power that created you has created the world.  If it can take care of you, it can similarly take care of the
world.  If God has created the world, it is his business to
look after it and not yours.

                                                  - Talks

Question:  Is the desire for Swaraj [political independence
of India] right?

Bhagavan:  Such desire no doubt begins with self-interest.
Yet practical work for the goal gradually widens the outlook
so that the individual becomes merged in the nation.  Such
merging of the individuality is desirable and the related karma
is nishkama [unselfish].

Arunachala Siva.