Author Topic: To whom vedas speaks ?  (Read 3515 times)

karthikeyan M

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To whom vedas speaks ?
« on: April 09, 2009, 04:21:02 PM »
Vedas, do vedas speak of particular diety.

matthias

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2009, 05:04:45 PM »
mostly vedas speak of karthikeyan M

Subramanian.R

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2009, 05:53:01 PM »
Dear karthikeyan. M

The answer of Matthias apart, Vedas speak of various deities.  But
Rig Veda starts with Agni, the Fire.  From Agni, all gods came!
The first verse starts:  AgnimiLe.....  Max Mueller was attracted
by this first word, and then started reading Rig Veda and he spent 40 years of his life in this.  During those years, Germany was in war
with Britain and so he could not come to India. He arranged a Sanskrit scholar and read Rig Veda in full.  Once in the classroom, (He was a
Professor in Heidelberg university, if I am not wrong...) the students were restless when he was talking about Rig Veda.  He started singing AgnimiLe... and went about for 20 minutes.  The whole class became silent and absorbed. Rig Veda and other Vedas, speak about natural
elements, Agni, Vayu, Varuna, Indra (Indra sometimes means Siva), Vayu and Jala and the Bhoomi.  Later when it comes to Yajur Veda and Samaveda, they speak about Siva, Narayana, Purusha, Uma etc., In Atharvana Veda, they speak about other lower gods, like angels used for black magic etc.,

Arunachala Siva.       

karthikeyan M

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2009, 07:58:22 PM »
Thanks Subramanian.R  for the post.

Can you tell be specific vedas that speak of Vishnu and Siva.

And also is Dravida veda that consisit of Alwars and Naynamars, are these available in English.

Thanks

Subramanian.R

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2009, 10:45:21 AM »
Dear karthikeyan. M

Yajur Veda has got Sri Rudram, which is a prayer to Siva.  It is
central to all the four Vedas and Nama Sivaya mantra is in the
centre of Sri Rudram, as a Ruby held at the centre of a pendant.
Rig Veda contains Purusha Sooktam, which is a prayer to Narayana,
the Purushottama.

The Dravida Vedas are 12 books of Saiva Canons called Tirumurais
and Naalaayira Divya Prabhandham, which contains roughly about
4000 verses of Azhwars, on Narayana.  These songs have been sung
in praise of various Siva and Vishnu icons of temples.  Thillai or
Chidambaram is the Temple, central to all Siva temples and Sri
Rangam is the Temple, central to all Vishnu temples.  I am not sure
whether any one has translated Saiva Canons, excepting Tiruvachakam (which is the 8th book) and Tirumandiram (10th
book)  in English.  The four thousand verses have not been translated, but for a few stray verses by A.K. Ramanujan in his book Hymns for the Drowning.  Dr. G.U.Pope and Prof. Vankmika Nathan have done
Tiruvachakam in English and one gentleman, I forgot the name, has done Tirumandiram, all the 3000 verses.  Saiva Canons, all put together come to about 16000 verses.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2009, 01:16:31 AM »
Vedas speak of the Brahman alone, all the Gods and Goddesses only signify the attributes of the Brahman alone which is only One. For eg. Siva means Auspiciousness Vishnu means All pervading, Shakti is force or energy etc..

Vedas speak of this Brahman alone! so do even the works in Tamil. in Saiva Margas, Siva and Brahman are one and the same - Brahman

Nagaraj
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2009, 10:37:18 AM »
Vedas speak about various detiies, including natural forces like
sun, moon, air, agni, water and the space.  Siva means Agni or
Effulgence.  Vishnu means one who is all pervading.  In Sri Rudram,
one chapter starts as Agno-Vishnu, one who is effulgence and is all
pervading.   The Sandhya Vandhana mantras include prayer to one
who is three eyed and long locked, (Siva)  and one who is black
and with red eyes and wearing golden robe, (peetambaram).  Vedas
have held Siva and Vishnu as the same deity.  They also call it
Brahman.  The differentiations and intra-fights came much after
Sri Ramanuja.

Arunachala Siva.

ramana_maharshi

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Re: To whom vedas speaks ?
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2010, 05:36:49 PM »
Dear all,

Some historians believe that the figure of Shiva as we know him today was built up over time, with the ideas of many regional sects being amalgamated into a single figure.

Shiva as we know him today shares many features with the Vedic god Rudra,and both Shiva and Rudra are viewed as the same personality in a number of Hindu traditions.

Rudra, the god of the roaring storm, is usually portrayed in accordance with the element he represents as a fierce, destructive deity.

Furthermore, the Rudram, one of the most sacred hymns of Hinduism found both in the Rig and the Yajur Vedas and addressed to Rudra, invokes him as Shiva in several instances, but the term Shiva is used as a epithet for Indra, Mitra and Agni many times.

The identification of Shiva with the older god Rudra is not universally accepted, as Axel Michaels explains:

Quote
To what extent Śiva's origins are in fact to be sought in Rudra is extremely unclear. The tendency to consider Śiva an ancient god is based on this identification, even though the facts that justify such a far-reaching assumption are meager.

In the Rigveda, Vishnu is mentioned 93 times. He is frequently invoked alongside other deities, especially Indra, who he helps in killing Vritra, and with whom he drinks Soma.

In the Mahabharata, Shiva is depicted as "the standard of invincibility, might, and terror", as well as a figure of honor, delight, and brilliance.The duality of Shiva's fearful and auspicious attributes appears in contrasted names.

During the Vedic period, both Vishnu and Shiva (as identified with Rudra) played relatively minor roles, but by the time of the Brahmanas (c. 1000-700 BCE), both were gaining ascendance.

The 'Vishnu Sukta' of the Rig Veda (1.154) says that the first and second of Vishnu's strides (those encompassing the earth and air) are visible to men and the third is in the heights of heaven (sky). This last place is described as Vishnu's supreme abode in RV 1.22.20:

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The princes evermore behold / that loftiest place where Visnu is / Laid as it were an eye in heaven. (trans. Griffith)

Vishnu is more than a mere companion, equal in rank or power to Indra, or sometime the one who made Indra's success possible.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2010, 05:42:36 PM by prasanth_ramana_maharshi »