Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo  (Read 8037 times)

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« on: March 30, 2009, 12:30:43 PM »
Mr. Frank Clune spent some time in 1940s both in Pondycherry and
Tiruvannamalai.  He spent more time with Sri Aurobindo as he was
attacted to yoga path.  He has written a book titled The Song of India, published first in Australia in 1946.

The Maharshi is not slient one like Sri Aurobindo.  But He is very
likeable and approachable, very human.  Not by education or booklearning but by sheer spirituality of His personality, an Asramam had been established and the simplicity of His teachings attracted one and all and His devotees had printed a book called Gospels.  I think both the Maharshi and Sri Aurobindo have arrived at the goal, through yoga and mind control.

Before leaving the Asramam, I attempted to interview the Saint --
but He turned the tables and interviewed me for half an hour, quizzing me about my adventures in many lands.  I got only one good question in, asking Him the meaning of tiger skin on which He sat. "It is a symbol of my firmness to protect my religion" was His smiling reply!  "But what is your religion?", I innocently asked.  ""Seeking the Truth", was His prompt reply!

He is immensely dignified and convincing, as a kind of personality.  Some Christian bishops have also this quality, -- but I doubt whether they could radiate it, sitting clothed only in a loin cloth, on a tiger skin!

(Source: Mountain Path, Jan-Mar 2009.)

Arunachala Siva.           

ramana_maharshi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3557
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2010, 11:08:17 PM »
The Recollections of Ramana Maharshi Devotee N. Balaram Reddy regarding Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo

In 1931, after reading about Sri Aurobindo, and also hearing about him from others, I made my way to his ashrama in Pondicherry. Immediately upon my arrival I was struck by the spiritual atmosphere of the place. On August 15th of that year, I had my first darshan of Sri Aurobindo. This was one of three times in a year that he gave darshan. I found Sri Aurobindo and Mother to be powerful spiritual personalities, as they seemed to have the ability to work on the development of their disciples in a silent and invisible manner. All of Aurobindo's philosophical writings cannot convey his or the Mother's power as spiritual embodiments.

While I was in Aurobindo Ashrama I met Kapali Sastriar, the esteemed disciple of both Aurobindo and Ganapati Muni. As he was now and then visiting Sri Ramanasramam, he would describe to me the Maharshi and his ashrama. His intriguing descriptions, along with the reading of B. V. Narasimhaswami's biography of the Maharshi, is what prompted my first visit to Ramanasramam in 1933.

Before this second visit to Ramanasramam I once again read Bhagavan's biography. In it I found a passage relating to the possibility of changing one's guru. I had a doubt about this and addressed it to the Maharshi. He told me, "Yes. Certainly. One can change his guru. What of that?"

In Aurobindo Ashrama our daily life, to a large extent, was regulated and controlled. For instance, even to take a simple trip into town we had to obtain permission. In contrast, here in Ramanasramam it was totally different. I experienced a liberating feeling of freedom, informality and spontaneity. Everything was so natural and at the same time elevating.

Also, in Aurobindo Ashrama, disciples were generally permitted to visit all other saints and ashramas, with the exception of the Maharshi and Sri Ramanasramam. It was believed that the Maharshi had the power to undo years of spiritual preparation that the Mother and Aurobindo were effecting on the psyche of their followers. In other words, they considered the Maharshi too powerful an influence. Bhagavan was aware of this and once when I was alone with him he told me, "Yes, I know of that place. They are afraid of me."

Leaving Aurobindo Ashram

I had been with the Mother and Aurobindo for five years. During those years they showered me with kindness and love, while guiding me on the spiritual path. My gratitude and regard for them compelled me to obtain their permission and blessings before leaving. This turned out to be much more difficult than I imagined.

In Aurobindo Ashram, it was the practice of the disciples who had doubts or questions to write them in the form of a letter to Sri Aurobindo. All the letters were daily collected and taken to Aurobindo, who would sit with the Mother during the nights and promptly answer them in writing. Sometimes we would see the lights burning all night as they were engaged in this work.

Upon my return from Ramanasramam I wrote a letter stating my desire to receive their blessings and permission to live at Ramanasramam. In the letter to Aurobindo I wrote that since your yoga begins with Self-realization, kindly permit me to go to Ramana Maharshi who emphasizes only Self-realization, a state I have not attained, or may not even be worthy of attaining. Aurobindo's reply was affectionate, but negative in regards to my leaving his ashram. He wrote, "Both Self-realization and the supra-mental state can be simultaneously developed and achieved here. There is no need for you to go there."

I was extremely disappointed at his response and consequently became frustrated, restless and discouraged. I soon began to have sleepless nights and felt distraught. I then wrote a second letter to Aurobindo with the same request. Again I was denied permission. It took a long five months and a third letter before Aurobindo and the Mother finally agreed, giving me their permission and blessings. Perhaps they realized I was determined to go and they saw no other recourse but to grant my request.

In Aurobindo's final letter to me he wrote, "Since you are determined to follow a path in which you can achieve only partial realization, we give you our blessings, though we believe it would be better if you stayed on here and pursued your sadhana where both the Mother and I can help you."

It was the rule in Aurobindo Ashram that any letter written to or received from Aurobindo should not leave the ashram premises. So, to comply with this rule, I burnt all my letters, except the final letter I received from Aurobindo. This I kept with the view of showing it to Bhagavan.

Settling at Sri Ramanasramam

During the early years there were no houses anywhere near the ashram, as it was mostly jungle or forest. I eventually found an upstairs room in a brahmin's house near the Arunachala Temple in town. For my meals I would sometimes cook small items in my room, sometimes obtain food from somewhere outside, and somehow manage without feeling inconvenienced.

Daily I would rise at about 3 or 4 a.m., walk to the ashram, stay in the hall with Bhagavan until 10 a.m., return to my room, come back again to the ashram at 3 p.m. and stay there until 8 p.m. It went on like this during the first year. If possible, I would always sit close to Bhagavan so I could hear all of his precious utterances.

S. S. Cohen, after repeatedly hearing about Sri Aurobindo, decided that the Yogi from Pondicherry must have some greatness. Consequently, one day he travelled to Pondicherry and while there wrote a note to Aurobindo describing who he was, what he wanted from life (Self-realization) and where he was then residing (Sri Ramanasramam). Cohen later showed me the reply he got from Aurobindo. It said, in brief, that all his aspirations could be fulfilled at Sri Ramanasramam, where he was then living.

I remember during my second visit to Ramanasramam the Maharshi was one day reading a lengthy book review from a newspaper. The book being reviewed was Aurobindo's Lights on Yoga. The reviewer was Kapali Sastri and the editor of this newspaper was Bhagavan's devotee, S. M. Kamath. Bhagavan seemed to take great interest in the review and would occasionally stop reading and comment on what he had just read to those sitting around him. When he had concluded reading it, someone who was aware that I had that very book with me, said to Bhagavan, "This man has come from the Aurobindo Ashram and he has that book with him." Bhagavan turned to me and said, "Oh, is that so? Let me have a look at it."

I went back to my room, fetched the book and handed it over to Bhagavan. Immediately Bhagavan began reading it intently. He kept on reading it well into the night, with the help of a small oil lamp, until he finished it.

When I came into the hall the next day he began discussing the book with me, telling me that a certain term used in the book might look like something new, but it is actually the equivalent of this other term used in such and such ancient text, etc. Like this, he went on discussing and comparing Aurobindo's philosophy for some time. So Bhagavan thoroughly understood Aurobindo's philosophy both intellectually and also from the standpoint of experience.

soham3

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 222
  • External world is shadow of what is inside you
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2010, 10:54:30 PM »
Aurobindo used to call Bhagawan

(a) Light of Asia     and

(b) Spiritual  Hercules.
O Divine, lead me to dizzy heights of sublimity & loftiness

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2010, 08:28:53 AM »
Dear soham3,

For a change, your statement (b) is true.  Aurobindo said that
"Ramana was a Hercules among the Yogis."

Arunachala Siva.

ksksat27

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 950
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2012, 05:27:30 PM »
The Recollections of Ramana Maharshi Devotee N. Balaram Reddy regarding Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo

In 1931, after reading about Sri Aurobindo, and also hearing about him from others, I made my way to his ashrama in Pondicherry. Immediately upon my arrival I was struck by the spiritual atmosphere of the place. On August 15th of that year, I had my first darshan of Sri Aurobindo. This was one of three times in a year that he gave darshan. I found Sri Aurobindo and Mother to be powerful spiritual personalities, as they seemed to have the ability to work on the development of their disciples in a silent and invisible manner. All of Aurobindo's philosophical writings cannot convey his or the Mother's power as spiritual embodiments.

While I was in Aurobindo Ashrama I met Kapali Sastriar, the esteemed disciple of both Aurobindo and Ganapati Muni. As he was now and then visiting Sri Ramanasramam, he would describe to me the Maharshi and his ashrama. His intriguing descriptions, along with the reading of B. V. Narasimhaswami's biography of the Maharshi, is what prompted my first visit to Ramanasramam in 1933.

Before this second visit to Ramanasramam I once again read Bhagavan's biography. In it I found a passage relating to the possibility of changing one's guru. I had a doubt about this and addressed it to the Maharshi. He told me, "Yes. Certainly. One can change his guru. What of that?"

In Aurobindo Ashrama our daily life, to a large extent, was regulated and controlled. For instance, even to take a simple trip into town we had to obtain permission. In contrast, here in Ramanasramam it was totally different. I experienced a liberating feeling of freedom, informality and spontaneity. Everything was so natural and at the same time elevating.

Also, in Aurobindo Ashrama, disciples were generally permitted to visit all other saints and ashramas, with the exception of the Maharshi and Sri Ramanasramam. It was believed that the Maharshi had the power to undo years of spiritual preparation that the Mother and Aurobindo were effecting on the psyche of their followers. In other words, they considered the Maharshi too powerful an influence. Bhagavan was aware of this and once when I was alone with him he told me, "Yes, I know of that place. They are afraid of me."

Leaving Aurobindo Ashram

I had been with the Mother and Aurobindo for five years. During those years they showered me with kindness and love, while guiding me on the spiritual path. My gratitude and regard for them compelled me to obtain their permission and blessings before leaving. This turned out to be much more difficult than I imagined.

In Aurobindo Ashram, it was the practice of the disciples who had doubts or questions to write them in the form of a letter to Sri Aurobindo. All the letters were daily collected and taken to Aurobindo, who would sit with the Mother during the nights and promptly answer them in writing. Sometimes we would see the lights burning all night as they were engaged in this work.

Upon my return from Ramanasramam I wrote a letter stating my desire to receive their blessings and permission to live at Ramanasramam. In the letter to Aurobindo I wrote that since your yoga begins with Self-realization, kindly permit me to go to Ramana Maharshi who emphasizes only Self-realization, a state I have not attained, or may not even be worthy of attaining. Aurobindo's reply was affectionate, but negative in regards to my leaving his ashram. He wrote, "Both Self-realization and the supra-mental state can be simultaneously developed and achieved here. There is no need for you to go there."

I was extremely disappointed at his response and consequently became frustrated, restless and discouraged. I soon began to have sleepless nights and felt distraught. I then wrote a second letter to Aurobindo with the same request. Again I was denied permission. It took a long five months and a third letter before Aurobindo and the Mother finally agreed, giving me their permission and blessings. Perhaps they realized I was determined to go and they saw no other recourse but to grant my request.

In Aurobindo's final letter to me he wrote, "Since you are determined to follow a path in which you can achieve only partial realization, we give you our blessings, though we believe it would be better if you stayed on here and pursued your sadhana where both the Mother and I can help you."

It was the rule in Aurobindo Ashram that any letter written to or received from Aurobindo should not leave the ashram premises. So, to comply with this rule, I burnt all my letters, except the final letter I received from Aurobindo. This I kept with the view of showing it to Bhagavan.

Settling at Sri Ramanasramam

During the early years there were no houses anywhere near the ashram, as it was mostly jungle or forest. I eventually found an upstairs room in a brahmin's house near the Arunachala Temple in town. For my meals I would sometimes cook small items in my room, sometimes obtain food from somewhere outside, and somehow manage without feeling inconvenienced.

Daily I would rise at about 3 or 4 a.m., walk to the ashram, stay in the hall with Bhagavan until 10 a.m., return to my room, come back again to the ashram at 3 p.m. and stay there until 8 p.m. It went on like this during the first year. If possible, I would always sit close to Bhagavan so I could hear all of his precious utterances.

S. S. Cohen, after repeatedly hearing about Sri Aurobindo, decided that the Yogi from Pondicherry must have some greatness. Consequently, one day he travelled to Pondicherry and while there wrote a note to Aurobindo describing who he was, what he wanted from life (Self-realization) and where he was then residing (Sri Ramanasramam). Cohen later showed me the reply he got from Aurobindo. It said, in brief, that all his aspirations could be fulfilled at Sri Ramanasramam, where he was then living.

I remember during my second visit to Ramanasramam the Maharshi was one day reading a lengthy book review from a newspaper. The book being reviewed was Aurobindo's Lights on Yoga. The reviewer was Kapali Sastri and the editor of this newspaper was Bhagavan's devotee, S. M. Kamath. Bhagavan seemed to take great interest in the review and would occasionally stop reading and comment on what he had just read to those sitting around him. When he had concluded reading it, someone who was aware that I had that very book with me, said to Bhagavan, "This man has come from the Aurobindo Ashram and he has that book with him." Bhagavan turned to me and said, "Oh, is that so? Let me have a look at it."

I went back to my room, fetched the book and handed it over to Bhagavan. Immediately Bhagavan began reading it intently. He kept on reading it well into the night, with the help of a small oil lamp, until he finished it.

When I came into the hall the next day he began discussing the book with me, telling me that a certain term used in the book might look like something new, but it is actually the equivalent of this other term used in such and such ancient text, etc. Like this, he went on discussing and comparing Aurobindo's philosophy for some time. So Bhagavan thoroughly understood Aurobindo's philosophy both intellectually and also from the standpoint of experience.

Please continue what happened next after Maharshi finished the book on Aurobindo's yoga.

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2012, 05:36:27 PM »
Quote
Please continue what happened next after Maharshi finished the book on Aurobindo's yoga.

Yes please continue ,I am also interested in reading that .
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana and Sri Aurobindo
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2012, 06:26:11 PM »
Dear Atmavichar,

Sri Aurobindo was following Yoga Marga. He felt that a man should keep the body fit and do yoga sadhana. For this, he was
even taking meat!  He did not approve Sri Bhagavan's Atma Vichara and said that it would give only 'partial realization!' 

Balarama Reddy is a rare case where he spent sometime with Sri Aurobindo and then with his permission, came to Sri
Bhagavan. Kavyaktana Ganapati Muni was given indirect indications to come to Sri Aurobindo, be he did not go him.,

1.  When Sri Aurobindo left his moral coil, his body was still warm for five or so hours and he did not develop rigor mortis.

2. There were a few devotees who were coming to  SriBhagavan also for darshan. One is Kapali Sastri. He came to read out
his bhashyam on Ramana Gita.  Another is Dilip Kumar Roy who used to come to Sri Bhagavan and sing melodious songs.

3. When the meteor rose and perched itself on Arunachala at the time of Maha Nirvana of Sri Bhagavan, Mother saw it
from Pondicherry and immediately prostrated towards that direction, as a mark of respect for Sri Bhagavan.

4. Today the relationship between Asramam and Sri Aurobindo's Ashram is quite cordial. The latter have been donating cows
to Sri Ramanasramam.

5. Sr Bhagavan was available 24 X 7. But to see Aurobindo was quite difficult. He used to give darshan along with Mother,
only once or twice a year. Again to dine with him is again a remote chance.

6. When Sri Bhagavan attained Maha Nirvana, Sri Aurobindo said: He is a Hercules among Yogis.

7. Sri Aurobindo's writings are quite tough to read and understand.

8. M.P. Pandit told the audience to translate Savitri in Tamizh about 30 years back. Nobody has ventured to do it till now.

9. M.P. Pandit has written a small book titled The Mighty Impersonality on Sri Bhagavan.

Arunachala Siva.