Author Topic: Madalasa Upadesha  (Read 25624 times)

munagala

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2009, 10:34:42 AM »
Dear Nagaraj,

The sages have spoken after they realized but for us the physical existence is the reality.

Books tell us the goal we have to reach finally, the route to the goal and describe the goal in various ways.
All accepted. But should we dimiss the reality we face each day based on philosophies we read.

Adi sankara  said everything is one without a second after attaining perfection.

For us, we are doing all actions with "I am the body" notion. Hence we don't have any authority to dismiss the world as unreal.

I am not against reading books. For me the great sages, books, vedas encourage us to find for ourselves the truth.
Once the goal is set we should pursue with earnestness and find for ourself.

Just a thought.


Regards,
Munagala.

Nagaraj

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #46 on: April 11, 2009, 11:10:43 AM »
Dear Munagala,

True, one will eventually find that the Sage, the Books, all Teachings come from ones own Consciousness alone. Eventually He will realise that there is no Sage apart from ones own Consciousness, There is no one realised apart from ones own Consciousness alone.

The Consciousness is the source of everything, from Ignorence to Eternal.

Nagaraj
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

matthias

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #47 on: April 13, 2009, 03:40:05 PM »
the self is not bound by karma, it is before the idea of karma. it is before any kind of idea....even of body//mind...

and indeed it is this arising moment, without labels, labels can of course come and go, mind can talk or not...when we rest as self we are not attached to all of this, so we do not have to change anything, become more wise, act more passionate...open our heart etc...

but at the same time we can choose to become better persons...but we should not misstake anysort of process from "delusion" to "enlightment" as genuine vichara....it is not in the same sphere, not in the same playground

matthias

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #48 on: April 13, 2009, 11:26:21 PM »
when you are a great yogi even torturing can be transformed or used as a jump into the self....(if such situations will bring you out of your samadhi...)

but for me, when such things would happen....I would be a big tormented ego thats for sure :D

Subramanian.R

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #49 on: April 14, 2009, 10:54:52 AM »
Bhagavan Ramana had very acute suffering during His last 2 years.
The pain became excruciating.  But when the attendants asked:
"Bhagavan!  Is it paining?"  Bhagavan Ramana answered: "Yes,
the body is paining!"  He is not the body!

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Madalasa Upadesha
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2009, 12:24:47 PM »
Dear srkudai,

You might have probably read the story.  Janaka was a Brahma Jnani and he was also ruling the country.  One day some brahmins came to him and with them they brought a retinue of brahmacharis, some
cows and some women.  Janaka invited them all.  He sent the brahmacharis to the Patasala guest house in the palace, with instructions to give them food and bed, sent the cows to the cowshed with instrucitons to give grass and plantains, and the women to the place where his women were staying, with instructions to give them
food, grapes and milk!  The brahmins were a little confused.  They asked the King Janaka, how he was viewing them differently with
different instructions, the king replied:  "If I follow Advaita with all
in the objective world, the world would laugh at me!"  Bhagavan
Ramana has also said: "Show Advaita to everyone but not to your
Guru, He is different from you, as long as you remain in the objective consciounsess."

Arunachala Siva.