Author Topic: Ramana Pada Malai of Muruganar  (Read 3836 times)

Subramanian.R

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Ramana Pada Malai of Muruganar
« on: June 14, 2008, 03:57:33 PM »
David Godman is informing in his website, that he is planning a
project of translating Muruganar's Tamil work, "Ramana Pada Malai"
a composition of of thousands of verses, describing the grace, love,
compassion and protection that is gained through Ramana's "Padam"
that is, His hallowed Feet.  The website contains a lot of information
and there are various comments about the work by those who have
read the Tamil original.  Bhagavan's Feet is sure to confer various
benefits to seekers who practice self-enquiry.  I request comments
from fellow Forum-members after reading this website and also from
those who have read the original Tamil work. The web address is:
www.davidgodman.org.  Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ramana Pada Malai of Muruganar
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2008, 12:56:37 PM »
Further to my post on Ramana Padamalai, of Muruganar,
almost all the Tamil Saiva Siddhanta saints have sung about
Siva's feet.  Manikka Vachakar's  "Tiruvembavai" (which is
incidentally sung in Tiruvnnamalai) is a glorious praise on
Siva's feet and almost 10 to 12 verses of this poem, mention
about Siva's feet.  The last verse is a beauty.  There is also a
Sanskrit poem called "Kunchitanghristavam", in 313 verses
by one Umapathi Sivcharya, written around 1300 A.D glorifying
the feet of "the raised foot" of Siva Nataraja of Chidambaram.
"The raised foot " is called "kunchitanghri".  The pointing hand
that directs the devotee to "the raised foot"   is called as "Gaja
Hastham" in Sanskrit.  The Gaja Hastham means the trunk of the
elephant, because that  hand looks like the trunk of the elephant.
Just like the elephant would pick even a needle from the floor, by its
trunk, Siva would pick even the lowly mortals, if they pray
to his Gaja Hastham, and place them in his raised foot.   David Smith
in his book,The Dance of Siva, mentions about  "Kunchitagristhavam  profusely.  He is also reported to have translated the poem in English.  Arunachala Siva.