Author Topic: The genesis of Bhagavad Gita Sara  (Read 3510 times)

Subramanian.R

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The genesis of Bhagavad Gita Sara
« on: February 27, 2009, 11:26:31 AM »
Bhagavad Gita Sara, the condensation of Srimad Bhagavad Gita,
by Bhagavan Ramana, in 42 verses, with changed order of the verses, different from the original, is known to everyone.  Its genesis took place in 1940.

GV Subbaramayya was once preparing a new edition of the BG for a friend who had been annually distributing copies of the Gita free to
local students, and had exhausted the previous edition. One day
GVS prayed to Bhagavan Ramana to select some verses from the BG.,
to be printed on the first pages of the book for daily recitation and easy remembrance by students. Bhagavan Ramana at first hesitated saying that there were already many Gita selections in the field.  But finally heeding to his repeated prayer, He selected 42 verses and gave them a new sequence.  Bhagavan Ramana also followed it up by translating them Himself into Tamil and Malayalam verses!  He also encouraged GVS to translated them into Telugu verses!

All these verses are now published by Asramam along with original Sanskrit Verses.  Arthur Osborne, later translated them into English.
The English version, with certain modifications by K. Swaminathan is available in the Complete Works.

Bhagavan Ramana added an Invocatory Verse, for His Tamil selection, in Tamil and Sanskrit.  Jagadeeswara Sastri, who had just then recovered from a serious illness, was asked to make a Sanskrit verse, of the Tamil invocation.  Again a Telugu invocatory translation was done by GVS.

"He who seated in Arjuna's chariot spoke the Gospel to Arjuna and removed his desires, may that embodiment of Grace, save us!"

GVS also wrote a Telugu verse of jubilation which stated:

"The same Lord, who 'then' spoke of the Gita, has 'now' taken shape as Ramana and is Himself giving us the nectareous essence of Gita, to taste, what a fortune!"

(Source: GVS - Reminscences.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: The genesis of Bhagavad Gita Sara
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2009, 03:11:19 PM »
Dear srkudai,

Yes.  Bhagavan Ramana is known for His brevity.  He told Muruganar once that even His occasional conversation, is a concession on Silence!  There are many things that make Him different.  I am thinking of some points to post, Why Bhagavan Ramana is different from other gurus or Jnanis?

He gave the essence of Vivekachoodmani in about 70 pages Tamil prose, which is highly readable, with a lot of Sanksritized Tamil words, that add to the charm of His prose.  He gave Atma Bodham of
Sankara in brief verses and stuck to the number of verses that are in original.  His Who am I? is known for its utter brevity.  All his advatic works are quite brief.  Arunachala Aksharamana Malai and Sri Arunachala Stuti Panchakam are brief verses.  His answers to Sri
Ganapati Sastri in Sri Ramana Gita are quite brief and to the point.
His dress was brief. His food was frugal.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: The genesis of Bhagavad Gita Sara
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2009, 03:37:47 PM »
Dear srkudai,

I was only writing about the difference of Bhagavan vis a vis other Brahma Jnanis.  Brevity is only one such difference.  I was never talking about one's supremacy over the other.  For each devotee, his own Guru is supreme and there is no doubt about.  And it should be so to reinforce his faith on that particular guru.

Arunachala Siva.