Author Topic: Self-Attention  (Read 6059 times)

nonduel

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Self-Attention
« on: April 29, 2008, 11:19:14 PM »
I have recently read Sri Sadhu Om's three books:  The Path of Sri Ramana part one, part two and the essence of sadhana.

I understand that Self-Enquiry is simply to keep our attention inwardly, at our consciousness of being, the I Am. In all the three states (waking, dreaming, deep dreamless sleep) awareness is always "there". In the waking, keeping our attention inwardly at our consciousness is the essence of Sadhana.

It is not the continous repetition of Who am I? like a parrot for example. More to scrutinize our inner consciousness of being, going deeply in this I Am consciousness.

Thus as continously as one can, keep the attention innerly on our awareness of being. One can also sit and close the eyes to do this, dwelling deeply, without effort, going at the source of "I".

This prevents thoughts, and keeping our attention thusly, on the "I-Thought" (the first thought where all other surge) eventually brings one to the source and the SELF.

I will be happy to read all comments and be corrected on my comprehension.
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

ashwin

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2008, 06:35:40 AM »
Hi nonduel,

The conclusion you have got to is absolutly correct.

I have gone through this few days back while doing meditation.It was great fealing which cant be expressed.

I like to take this oppurunity to ask every member of this forum,

1) How much time do you spend for meditation?
2) When you are writing a comment for a members query, do you have any personal experience or do you write this reading books?

Please be clear....
Cheers :D
 

mark

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2008, 10:25:27 AM »
 

Noduel,
The only thing I would disagree with you on, it is not to "prevent" thoughts, it is only to quiet the mind  in having thoughts so self can be realized.


ashwin
1) If time is realized mind is here.
I spend no time meditating. Vigilance dictates only this moment.
But self is still waiting for mind to be quiet as of yet. I still go in and out of resistance
2) I read Who am I? Those words pointed the way.
Have I had a personal experience? Who is this person having an experience?
Only me.
Mark

nonduel

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2008, 08:23:07 PM »


Noduel,
The only thing I would disagree with you on, it is not to "prevent" thoughts, it is only to quiet the mind  in having thoughts so self can be realized.


ashwin
1) If time is realized mind is here.
I spend no time meditating. Vigilance dictates only this moment.
But self is still waiting for mind to be quiet as of yet. I still go in and out of resistance
2) I read Who am I? Those words pointed the way.
Have I had a personal experience? Who is this person having an experience?
Only me.
Mark


Yes I agree on your point about not trying to prevent thoughts. If you read my post again (below) you will see that I was saying that it is the Self-Attention, Self-Enquiry which results in preventing thoughts  from surging. Not making an effort, per-se, at preventing thoughts.

QUOTE:
Thus as continously as one can, keep the attention innerly on our awareness of being. One can also sit and close the eyes to do this, dwelling deeply, without effort, going at the source of "I".

This prevents thoughts, and keeping our attention thusly, on the "I-Thought" (the first thought where all other surge) eventually brings one to the source and the SELF.


On this subject again, Sri Ramana, Sri Sadhu Om also said to PRACTICE, that this is the greatest sadhana. They also mentionned the one-pointedness of the mind on Self-Attention, and an unrelenting application. Determination in other words.

There are two "ways" of doing this sadhana. Sitting, eyes closed and doing Self-Enquiry, like I wrote. very similar, one could say, to meditation. Then this is more a BEING what we ARE than a DOING.

I find myself that doing this, and scrutinizing this I AM ("I-Thought") brings a reaction, a deepening, an inner movement, stirring...

The second "way" is doing this throughout the day. Having my attention inward, on the BEING, the I AM. This with eyes open, even in activities.

On this, is there a amount of "time" that will hasten liberation, destroying the ego?  Is the sitting, eyes closed a superior sadhana that the second approach? Has this point been asked Sri Ramana?

Thank you
« Last Edit: April 30, 2008, 08:48:29 PM by nonduel »
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

nonduel

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2008, 08:58:41 PM »
Hello Ashwin,

In answer to your question to member, I occasionally practice sitting down, eyes closed, in very brief moment. It sort of impose Itself, the feeling rises inside to close the eyes and "dive" inward. I very often during the day turn my attention inside, to the "I-Thought", the I AM. What Sri Sadhu Om described as Self-Attention. This is what I mostly "do".

There is a very pleasant feeling that comes with this.

Abiding in the Self is the Jnani
Self-Attention is on the "I-Thought".

 
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

mark

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2008, 10:04:59 PM »
Nonduel,
Indeed. words get in the way sometimes for me. We speak the same thought.
Intention can get lost in the words we choose to use. I just wanted to be clear cause I tried resisting for many years what I was thinking and feeling and it is just more mind games.
 I find it very difficult to write about nonduality, but it is vigilance for me to do so. And I love it.
That is wonderful you are aware of self when involved in activites. 
As of yet I still fall back into mind when engaged in worldly activites
 But I am becoming aware of the answear when asking the question "Who am I" or especially "who is having this thought"repeatedly. 
Nobody but me.
I like that
Mark

nonduel

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2008, 12:45:48 AM »
Nonduel,
Indeed. words get in the way sometimes for me. We speak the same thought.
Intention can get lost in the words we choose to use. I just wanted to be clear cause I tried resisting for many years what I was thinking and feeling and it is just more mind games.
 I find it very difficult to write about nonduality, but it is vigilance for me to do so. And I love it.
That is wonderful you are aware of self when involved in activites. 
As of yet I still fall back into mind when engaged in worldly activites
 But I am becoming aware of the answear when asking the question "Who am I" or especially "who is having this thought"repeatedly. 
Nobody but me.
I like that
Mark

Mark, just to be clear, and I agree that it is not easy to write (and talk) of nonduality. When you write that "I am aware of the self in activities", that is not right. I probably wasn't clear in my writing. I am not aware most of the time in activities. Someone will talk to me and bingo I'm out! I will get caught with something on the TV, the phone...well you get it!

I do work at it !

It is a continual in-out thing. It is becoming like an habit and it will come in my thought, and then I will draw my attention inwardly and sort put it on "Being", on the self (with a little "s"). But so many things will draw my attention outwardly that I cannot keep this self-attention for long.

I understand that at one point, one's self-attention will stay focused without fail.

So you understand that I also fall back into mind.

Self-Enquiry is more of a feeling, than a mental question. I do ask "Who Am I?" but not so mechanically. Sri Ramana used the metaphor of the pearl diver, holding his breath and diving deep into the sea. It does feel that way for me, like a diving in the depth of the self when the attention is drawn inwardly and scrutisizing self.

Now this is my experience, for what it is worth.
Oh Arunachala, blazing fire of Jnana, in my heart I pray and think of Thee from afar, root out the ego, merging me in the Self.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Self-Attention
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2008, 04:54:24 PM »
Nonduel, your method of practice is correct.   When thoughts
gush forth, you should kill them as you kill the soldiers from the
fort of the enemy.  If all the soldiers are vanquished, the fort
is in your hands.  First, one can keep the eyes closed and be without
thoughts.  Closing the eyes, while doing office or other work, will
not be possible but by practice, this becomes possible.  As Bhagavan
says towards the end of Who am I?, if 'i' rises, everything 'rises'.
If 'i' subsides, everything subsides.  To the extent, one is humble, it
is good.  When one controls the mind, one can be anywhere, be it
office or home.  In my case, thoughts keep on gushing forth, and
I try to cling one thought of Arunachala-Siva, like an elephant holding
on its trunk, an iron chain.  This happens from the time I get up till
I sleep.