Author Topic: Arunachala Akshara Mana Malai  (Read 1860 times)

Subramanian.R

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Arunachala Akshara Mana Malai
« on: November 15, 2008, 12:33:23 PM »
The bridal song of letters, is made up of two line verses, an indication
of brevity.  It starts with Tamil alphabet 'a' and ends with 'va' and again
'a' etc., are repeated a few times to complete 108 verses.  The
refrain Arunachala Siva, is repeated in between two verses.  The
song is also completed repeating Arunachala Siva, a number of times.

Why such a bridal song, should be in brief two line verses?  Why
not three line verses like Upadesa Saram, Tamil, or in four line
verses like Sad Darsanam, Tamil?  I was thinking about this point.

The bride always calls her lover in brief words or phrases.  She does
not use elaboration.  Imagine a woman calling her lover, or being
in bed with her lover.  She will say merely:  O my Lord!  or O my
Prana Natha, the Master of my soul!"  For example, Lakshmi
in bed with Vishnu, would merely say, 'O my Lord', and not as:
" O Narayana, wearing a yellow robe, having conch shell, the disc,
the mace, and sleeping on Adi Sesha, the killer of Kamsa, the brother
of Uma, or the Master of Jaya, Vijaya... all this crap!"

Any extremity of emtions will only be brief.  No elaboration.  No
Shakespearian rag!  When Jacquline Kennedy, saw the bullets
piercing John Kennedy, in Dallas, Texas, she merely exlaimed:
'Oh, No.'.  She did not say, 'O my husband, the 44th President of
United States, the Supreme Commander of the world's mightiest
Armed Forces... etc., etc.,   When we see a snake in the garden,
we merely say: "O snake" and run away.  We do not elaborate.

This is the prime reason for Arunachala Akshra Mana Malai, or any
mystic songs of saints and poets being brief.  Kabir Das made only
dohas.  Tayumanvar has composed a song called Malai Valar Kadhali,
the Lady reared by the mountain Himavan, there he addresses Siva
and Parvati in brief two line verses, called "Kannis" in Tamil.
So also in his Ananda Kalippu, the exclamation of Ananda and other
songs.

Brevity is a virtue.  And coming back to Upadesa Saram, that is why,
Bhagavan Ramana said, meditation without movement of lips within,
is greater than elaborate poojas and mantra japas.

Arunachala Siva.