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Messages - Nagaraj

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3031
General topics / Re: Ramana Maharshi and Mahatma Gandhi
« on: October 03, 2012, 11:10:17 AM »
Very beautiful Sri Ravi. Than you.

since some months back, i have verily given up, this thing about identifying a jnani, jivanmukta and so on. i felt it is needless. It is more easier and lighter to leave these mind from knowing who is a jnani and ajnani. Like the verse goes, where ever there is tears of ecstasy of devotion, where ever there is compassion overflowing, there resides the Supreme Truth, and it feels from within to bow and sink within out of the immensity of Bhava, that resides there in.


3032
General topics / Re: Ramana Maharshi and Mahatma Gandhi
« on: October 03, 2012, 10:41:20 AM »
I would like learn, can somebody help me identify a Jnani? Can somebody be able to tell me the nature of a Jnani? Who is Ajnani, and who is a Jnani?


3033
General Discussion / Re: Mother Theresa
« on: October 03, 2012, 09:47:25 AM »
Heart touching stories. one has to allow oneself to be soaked in those moments, as one allows to be soaked, mind gets switched off.

These are the fruits of Shravana. The reason why the is practice of reading Bhagavata Saptaham, Ramayana, etc.. is that one is able to free oneself from the grips of mind, and awake  to the heart.


3034
General topics / Re: Ramana Maharshi and Mahatma Gandhi
« on: October 03, 2012, 09:43:57 AM »
Wonderful stories, thank you, every sadhaka should read Mahatma's "Experiments with truth" what one unearth's at the end of it is that one is blessed with "Vinaya" humility. it flashes within, can one be so humble, especially in his environment? ie. where dirty politics reign, ego clashes, ideology clashes. It may be relatively easy to remain humble in Ashrams and temples, churches, and so on, where humility is celebrated.


3035
General Discussion / Re: Siva and Vishnu
« on: October 02, 2012, 10:00:17 PM »
Sri Anand,

I happend to remember this in some other context, but it quite addresses your query:

Once, when the urchava murti- the idol meant for procession, and was passing by the Ashram. The arati plate offered to Arunachaleswarar was brought to Bhagavan by Ashram devotees and Sri Bhagavan took a little Vibhuti (holy ashes) and applied it to his forehead, saying in an undertone “Appakku Pillai Adakkam” (The son is beholden to the father). His voice seemed choked with emotion as he spoke. The expression on his face proved the ancient saying “bhakti poornathaya Jnanam” (the culmination of devotion is knowledge).

This bhava of a child before the father remained a feature of His relations with Lord Annamalai. He did not profess any separate will of his own other than the divine will. He never felt any grief nor any mundane happiness.


3036
The teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi / Re: Our Bhagavan-Comments
« on: October 02, 2012, 09:57:03 PM »
With Regards to the post:

Quote
“Bhagavan is it possible to attain liberation through music alone or would other spiritual practices be required,?" the lady asked.

Bhagavan remained silent as if to reveal the stillness of the Atman where no music can penetrate.

The lady, unable to understand Bhagavan's silence further queried, “Did not Saint Thyagaraja and other saints attain moksha by singing the praises of God?"

A smile broke forth from Bhagavan. He said,

"Avaallaam, Adayarthukaaga Paadalai, Adanjada paadinaa"

“Thyagaraja and the others did not attain Moksha through their songs but from the ecstasy that sprang forth from within as a result of their realisation of the ultimate. Their songs were just an expression of their blissful state. This was the reason why their music stood the test of time. This is what is called as 'Nadopanishad!"

it will be interestin to note that Thyagaraja has lamented to God in so many songs, here is one such beautiful song:

Oh Lord you are an opportunist, You deceived your parents Devaki , Vasudeva as also the gopikas who surrendered to you, You mischievously smile when Yashoda innocently folded you with love at the thought that she too would be disappointed on being separated from him, You falsified the aforesaid words of Sruti and Smruti. You have somehow not come to me despite the fact that I was overjoyed in keeping your memory always in my heart, You preached patience, tolerance in the face of adversity freedom from anger, satsang etc; and coolly accepted my pujas, You give bhakti and peace, Despite all this you have steadfastly not come closer to me to the end, Thus this kirthana, a gem amongst the five kirthanas which bring out the thought and reminiscences of Shri Thayagaraja; is a great gift to the singer and bhaktas .

What is beautiful is the celebration of Truth by these Great souls. In spite of having seen the Truth, some great souls continue to remain so humble and meek, and aspire to remain as a Son, as a devotee to the Supreme Truth, and continue to adore the Lord as a personal God. It is nothing these great souls do not know. It is their humility, a sincerity, a gratitude to their "Truths"

Once, when the urchava murti- the idol meant for procession, and was passing by the Ashram. The arati plate offered to Arunachaleswarar was brought to Bhagavan by Ashram devotees and Sri Bhagavan took a little Vibhuti (holy ashes) and applied it to his forehead, saying in an undertone “Appakku Pillai Adakkam” (The son is beholden to the father). His voice seemed choked with emotion as he spoke. The expression on his face proved the ancient saying “bhakti poornathaya Jnanam” (the culmination of devotion is knowledge).

This bhava of a child before the father remained a feature of His relations with Lord Annamalai. He did not profess any separate will of his own other than the divine will. He never felt any grief nor any mundane happiness.

The life of Ramana gives us the clue as to the right attitude in life and the kind of relations we should have with Lord Siva.


3037
General Discussion / Re: Siva and Vishnu
« on: October 02, 2012, 09:36:45 PM »
Dear Sri Anand,

The Smritis do not say anything point blank. The Smritis are quite open. As the saying goes, Yad Bhavam Tad Bhavati. You attain God in the form you worship.

It is said, Sri Rama Sita Lakshmana Anjaneya gave darshan to Thyagaraja Swami, can we interpret it as myth?

Just look at yourself, we have limbs, eyes, nose, mouth, and we are well dressed, so what is not possible? The Supreme Truth can be seen in exactly the way you would desire to. Our Puranas, are a testimony.

Every way is a possibility. The Shrutis are clear about only one thing, that is faith. As regards to Saguna Nirguna upasana, you can attain God in any way your heart appeals. God can be reached through Nirguna Upasana, Saguna Upasana, and other ways as well.

Theories are just words, the mystic relationship between ones Soul and Supreme reality cannot be declared as this and that. Dvaita, Visishtaadvaita  and other schools are as true. You reach God in the way you see.

All truths are True.

As the saying goes, from Tennyson "God fulfills himself in many ways. Let one good custom should corrupt the world”.By Tennyson"


3038
The teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi / Adanjada paadinaa
« on: October 02, 2012, 09:28:05 PM »
One day a lady who was well versed in classical music and who was also proficient in playing the Veena , came up with a question to Bhagavan.

“Bhagavan is it possible to attain liberation through music alone or would other spiritual practices be required,?" the lady asked.

Bhagavan remained silent as if to reveal the stillness of the Atman where no music can penetrate.

The lady, unable to understand Bhagavan's silence further queried, “Did not Saint Thyagaraja and other saints attain moksha by singing the praises of God?"

A smile broke forth from Bhagavan. He said,

"Avaallaam, Adayarthukaaga Paadalai, Adanjada paadinaa"

“Thyagaraja and the others did not attain Moksha through their songs but from the ecstasy that sprang forth from within as a result of their realisation of the ultimate. Their songs were just an expression of their blissful state. This was the reason why their music stood the test of time. This is what is called as 'Nadopanishad!"

The astonished lady prostrated to Bhagavan and said, “Bhagavan all these days I have been living with my own misinterpretation of facts and mistaken beliefs. You have illumined me. My doubts have dispelled and my mind is clear and free!"


3039
The teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi / riding a horse
« on: October 01, 2012, 04:24:46 PM »
The single most powerful memory of those days in my personal experience of Bhagavan occurred one day when I accompanied my mother to the ashram. I was about 5 years old at the time. Bhagavan was sitting on a small pial (raised platform) in the thatched room adjoining the Old Hall. The place is where Bhagavan's samadhi is now. The platform faced east whereas in the Old Hall Bhagavan faced south. My mother prostrated before Bhagavn in the traditional way and I who was standing next to her, suddenly climbed on her back, and sat there as if riding a horse or an elephant. My mother became very angry and tried to push me down. But Bhagavan, seeing my innocent mischief, smiled and enjoyed the fun. He bade my mother not to scold or push but stay in that prostrated posture for a few seconds more. When I recollect this incident I become enthralled at the memory of his beautiful, smiling countenance. He loved children and their playful mischief.

~ D. Rajaram, The Mountain Path,  June, 2003



When Bhagavan was living on the hill, a big monkey came one day when he was having his food, and sat near him. Bhagavan was about to put a morsel of food into his mouth, but when he saw the monkey he gave it the morsel. The monkey took it, put it on the plate and gave Bhagavan a square slap on the cheek. “What do you mean, you fellow? Why are you angry? I gave you the first morsel!” exclaimed Bhagavan. Then he understood his mistake. It was a king monkey and he had to be treated in the right royal manner. Bhagavan called for a separate leaf plate and a full meal was served to the king, who ate it all with dignity and proudly went away.

Ramana Smrti Souvenir



One day the cow Lakshmi came to the Hall. She went straight to Bhagavan, put her head on Bhagavan’s shoulder and wept. Bhagavan sat very quietly and gently stroked her head. “Why are you so sad?” he would whisper in her ears. “Who has hurt you? Cheer up, my dear, stop crying. I am here to befriend you.” Lakshmi stopped crying, gave Bhagavan a few licks and went away, comforted.

Ramana Smrti Souvenir




3040
General Discussion / Re: Mother Theresa
« on: October 01, 2012, 03:10:34 PM »
Sri Tushmin,

The whole object is to discern that these points which you have mentioned, do not determine whether a person is a Jnani or not. Nobody knows. Ordinary eyes do not know. A Jnani may continue to behave like a Ajnani. We cannot identify a Jnani with our notions, be it, with the help of verses of Adi Shankara or Ramanuja or Ramana or Ramakrishnar, ie. we can never identify a jnani with our mind and senses that works on logics. She cried, she sent letters to pope saying she could not feel God, these things do not constitute a method by which one can determine whether one is a Jnani or not.

In such a case, let me present you some verses from Valmiki Ramayan, since you began you postings in Forum by posting verses from Vasishtam, you must be quite familiar with the background of Rama and the story of Ramayana as well:

त्वरमाणो जगामाथ सीतादर्शनलालसः।
शून्यमावसथं दृष्ट्वा बभूवोद्विग्नमानसः।।3.60.3।।


Anxious and craving to see Sita he went to the hermitage and not finding her there he was disturbed mentally. (can we say, he is troubled by feelings, emotions? what explanation can we give - Nagaraj)

यत्नान्मृगयमाणस्तु नाससाद वने प्रियाम्।
शोकरक्तेक्षणश्शोकादुन्मत्त इव लक्ष्यते।।3.60.10।।


He searched for her in the forest with great effort. He did not find his beloved. He appeared like a mad man as he was in grief stricken with his eyes turned red due to sorrow. (can we say, he is troubled by Moha for Sita, that he wailed like Madman)

he was:

शोकार्णवपरिप्लुतः immersed in a sea of sorrow

he went on to lament to trees, O Kadamba tree, Bilva tree, Arjuna Tree, tell me about my beloved the gracious faced lady who is a lover of Kadamba flowers, if you know about her.

चूतनीपमहासालान्पनसान्कुरवान्धवान्।
दाडिमाननसान्गत्वा दृष्ट्वा रामो महायशाः।।3.60.21।।
मल्लिका माधवीश्चैव चम्पकान्केतकीस्तथा।
पृच्छन्रामो वने भान्तः उन्मत्त इव लक्ष्यते।।3.60.22।।


Rama of great fame enquired of Mango trees, Kadamba trees, Sala trees, Jack fruit trees, trees with white flowers, Pomegranates, Jasmines, Madhavis and, Champaka trees, as well as Kethaki trees going near them and seeing, wandering in confusion, looked like a mad man.

Rama, the son of Dasaratha seeing the empty cottage, not finding Sita, seats of the cottage being disturbed, looking allover, not able to find Sita held his (Lakshmana's) radiant shoulders and wept aloud.

वृक्षेणाच्छाद्य यदि मां सीते हसितुमिच्छसि।
अलं ते हसितेनाद्य मां भजस्व सुदुःखितम्।।3.61.4।।

O Sita! If you are intending to make fun with me by hiding behind tree I tell you to stop. Come and entertain this grieved man.

सीतया रहितोऽहं वै न हि जीवामि लक्ष्मण।
मृतं शोकेन महता सीताहरणजेन माम्।।.3.61.6।।
परलोके महाराजो नूनं द्रक्ष्यति मे पिता।

Lakshmana I can not live without Sita. I am filled with deep sorrow by Sita's abduction. I will die. King Dasaratha my father will certainly meet me in the other world.

Lakshmana goes on to console Rama with wise and soft words

एवं स विलपन्रामस्सीताहरणकर्शितः।
दीनश्शोकसमाविष्टो मुहूर्तं विह्वलोऽभवत्।।3.61.28।।


Rama thus pulled down by crying for the abduction of Sita, got dejected and over powered by grief lost his consciousness for a moment.



There are over 3 to 5 Cantos, where Rama cries and goes on lamenting with excruciating pain to Lakshmana. He also in some cantos, questions the Gods, if they were silent like stones...and so on....

Well, i do not want to get into a discussion about who is truly realised and whois truly not realised, as i discern it is futile. All I am striving to communicate is that these cryings laments of great souls do not bring any blemish onto their inner Self. The logics that our minds bring out, can never touch that Truth.

We can never know. If we are able to say is some body is not a Jnani for such and such reasons, well elucidated, then who are we? If a Jnani sees Jnani everywhere, how does one see an Ajnani in somebody?


3041
General Discussion / Re: my musings
« on: October 01, 2012, 01:01:14 PM »
Sri Tushnim,

true, but i don't get why the word "emotion" is coming in to picture of discussion here, as i felt, the essence is quite clear already, why really get into intricacies whether it is emotion or whether it is feelings? these are mere words. don't you feel so? i feel, we can leave this interpretation of words for scholars. A less english knowledgeable person may still continue to say emotion, but still, it may not be an emotion really. What matter is the spirit. I believe, we are all simpletons. Lets move with heart, and leave words behind. Feeling and emotions are one and the same, what is important to know is that, call it,  feelings or emotions, it should not be in control of us, but we have to be in control of them. This is important. some people may say feelings some people may say emotions. what matters? is it not :)


3042
General Discussion / I feel intensely indeed
« on: October 01, 2012, 12:27:05 PM »
But if Vivekananda was a scholar, a dynamic person and a man of various parts - infact a genius, he was a man of heart as well. When on the eve of leaving for the west he was met near Mount Abu by Swami Turiyananda, who asked him about his spiritual realisation, the Swami replied, "Brother Hari(Turiyananda), I do not quite understand what spirituality is" and he paused for a while, his countenance expressing a deep seated sorrow; then he added with assurance "but my heart has expanded very much, and I have learnt to feel. Believe me, I feel intensely indeed"

(P 72, History of the Ramakrishna Math and Mission, Swami Gambhirananda)


3043
General Discussion / Re: The supreme compassion of Sri Ramana
« on: October 01, 2012, 10:43:55 AM »
Sri Michal James has very comprehensively written his contemplation on this subject that we so passionately were debating and discussing about, getting into its intricacies and details and the subtler aspects. I humbly request members (who are interested) to read these 2 articles in full, the spirit of what is conveyed is truly the essence of it. Thank you.


3044
General Discussion / The importance of compassion and ahimsa
« on: October 01, 2012, 10:39:03 AM »
In continuation of my previous post, The supreme compassion of Sri Ramana, the following is what I have newly incorporated on pages 601 to 609 of the forthcoming printed edition of Happiness and the Art of Being:

By both his words and his example he [Sri Ramana] taught us the virtue of perfect ahimsa or compassionate avoidance of causing any harm, injury or hurt to any sentient being. Through his life and his teachings he clearly indicated that he considered ahimsa or ‘non-harming’ to be a greater virtue than actively trying to ‘do good’. Whereas ahimsa is a passive state of refraining from doing any action that could directly or indirectly cause any harm or suffering to any person or creature, ‘doing good’ is an active interference in the outward course of events and in the affairs of other people, and even when we interfere thus with good intent, our actions often have harmful repercussions.

When we try to do actions that we believe will result in ‘good’, we often end up causing harm either to ourself or to others, or to both. The danger to ourself in our trying to do ‘good’ to others lies principally in the effect that such actions can have on our ego. If we engage ourself busily and ambitiously in trying outwardly to do ‘good’, it is easy for us to overlook the defects in our own mind, and to fail to notice the subtle pride, egotism and self-righteousness that tend to arise in our mind when we concentrate on rectifying the defects of the outside world rather than rectifying our own internal defects.

Moreover, what we consider to be ‘good’ is often quite different to what other people consider to be ‘good’, so unless we are very careful the ‘good’ that we try to do to others may in fact be unwanted. Even if we feel strongly that our idea of ‘good’ is right and some other people’s idea of it is wrong, we should be careful not to try to impose our idea of ‘good’ upon them, because when we do so our efforts will only create resentment and conflict, which will usually result in causing more harm than any actual good.

Most actions have multiple effects, so the repercussions of our actions are often not what we intend them to be. The greater the ‘good’ that we try to do, the greater the harm that may result. Since the beginning of human history, many social, political and religious reformers have come and gone, but none of their attempted reforms have ever resulted in unmixed good. Any action or series of actions that has a significant impact upon this world inevitably results in a mixture of good and bad — benefit and harm.

Many of the greatest evils and injustices in this world have resulted from supposedly well-intentioned social, political, economic or religious reforms. Even in the name of God countless conflicts have occurred, which have sometimes even resulted in cruel persecutions, wars and terrorism. From all this we should understand that attempts to do good can result in great harm, and that our primary moral duty is therefore to avoid causing any harm rather than to try to do any good.

In many situations, far greater good can result by our refraining from doing any action than could possibly result by our doing any action, because whatever good might result from any action that we could do would not compensate for the harm that would result from it. In other words, our inaction — our just being without doing anything — can often be truly more beneficial than any amount of action or ‘doing’ could be.

As a general rule, if any action is likely to cause harm to any sentient being, we should refrain from doing it, even though it may also result in some good. Moreover, whatever action we may decide either to do or to refrain from doing in any particular situation, we always should remember that the ultimate good, which is the infinite happiness of true self-knowledge, can never be achieved by any amount of action or ‘doing’, but only by just ‘being’ — that is, by our abiding peacefully in our own natural state, which is the egoless, thought-free and therefore absolutely actionless state of perfectly clear self-conscious being.

This is not to say, however, that we should not do anything to help other people or creatures when an immediate need arises, but only that we should not be too ambitious in our desire to do good. We should respond appropriately to any situation we find ourself in, but we need not actively seek situations in which we imagine that our help may be required. Moreover, even when a situation does arise in which our help appears to be required, we should take care to do only whatever help or ‘good’ is truly appropriate, and we should at the same time be very vigilant not to cause any form of harm in our attempt to do good.

From the example set by Sri Ramana, we should understand that it is good for us to be always humble, unselfish, kind, caring, considerate, gentle, compassionate, generous and sharing, and that all our outward actions and reactions — which in many cases may appropriately include our refraining from doing certain actions or any action whatsoever — should always be guided by these inward qualities of mind and heart. The great importance of such true generosity, kindness and care was clearly emphasised by Sri Ramana when he concluded this nineteenth paragraph of Nan Yar? by saying:

… All that one gives to others one is giving only to oneself. If [everyone] knew this truth, who indeed would refrain from giving?
All that we give to others (especially the tender-hearted love, kindness, compassion, sympathy, affection, care and consideration that we give to them) we are giving only to ourself because no one — no person, animal, plant or any other thing — is truly other than ourself, our essential self-conscious being or ‘am’-ness.

This is the real meaning of the teaching of Christ, "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind... Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself" (Matthew 22.37, 39, and Mark 12.30-31). We cannot truly love either God or our neighbour — any of our fellow sentient beings — as ourself unless we actually experience them as ourself, and if we do not love them as ourself, we cannot really love them with all our heart, soul and mind.

Love for anything other than ourself can never be a whole love, but can only be a divided and therefore partial love, because we always love ourself more than we can ever love any other person or thing. Therefore if we truly wish to love either God or our neighbour wholly — with all our heart, soul and mind — we must experience them as ourself, and in order to experience them thus, we must experience ourself as we really are — that is, as the one infinite and indivisible absolute reality, which is the real essence or true substance of all that is. Hence, since we cannot experience ourself thus as the one infinite, undivided, non-dual and all-inclusive whole so long as we attend to anything that appears to be other than ourself, in order to experience and love both God and our neighbour as ourself, we must withdraw our mind entirely from their imaginary outward forms and focus it keenly and exclusively upon our own essential self-conscious being, ‘I am’, which alone is their real and essential form.

Therefore until we merge and lose ourself entirely in our natural state of absolutely non-dual self-conscious being, which alone is the state of true self-knowledge, our love for God and for our neighbour will only be partial and imperfect. However, even though we may not yet actually experience and love all our fellow sentient beings as ourself, if we have really understood at least theoretically that they are truly not other than ourself, we will naturally feel compassion for them and will therefore empathise with all their sufferings. When we feel such compassion and empathy for all sentient beings, we will naturally refrain as far as possible from causing even the least harm or suffering to any of them.

However, our love, compassion and concern for other people and animals should not lead us to believe that we can do any great good in this world, or that this world needs us to reform it. Whenever any person told Sri Ramana that he had an ambition to reform the world in some way or to do any other such ‘good’, he would say, "He who has created this world knows how to take care of it. If you believe in God, trust him to do whatever is necessary for this world". On many occasions and in many ways, Sri Ramana made it clear that our duty is not to reform the world but only to reform ourself.

To people who lacked subtle understanding, he would say that since this world is created by God, he knows how to take care of it, thereby indicating that this world is exactly as God intends it to be, and that he intends it to be thus for the true benefit of all concerned. However, to people of more subtle understanding, he would say that this world is a creation of our own mind, and exists only in our mind in the same manner that a dream exists only in our mind, and that whatever defects we see in this world are therefore reflections of our mind’s own defects. Hence, rather than trying to reform the reflection, we should try to reform the source of it, which is our own mind. If we reform our mind by restoring it to our natural state of just being, its reflection will also merge and become one with our true being, which is the infinite fullness of unalloyed happiness and love.

Though all the manifold problems of this world can be effectively solved only by our turning our mind inwards and drowning it in its source, which is our own absolutely non-dual self-conscious being, so long as our mind is turned outwards, we will continue to mistake ourself to be just a body-bound person — one among the many such body-bound creatures living in this material world. When we thus mistake ourself to be a finite person, we inevitably become involved in the activities of our body, speech and mind, and our actions unavoidably have an effect upon other people and creatures.

Therefore in this dualistic state of activity we are responsible for the effects of our actions, and hence we must take care not to cause any harm to any of our fellow embodied beings. The benefit of our thus carefully practising the virtue of ahimsa or ‘non-harming’ is twofold. Not only do we thereby avoid as far as possible causing any harm or suffering to any other sentient beings, but we also thereby cultivate the tenderness of mind that is required for us to be able to turn within and merge in our natural state of just being.

If we are heartlessly indifferent to the sufferings of others, we will not be able to succeed in any effort that we may make to turn within, because such heartlessness is caused only by the density of our ego — by our strong attachment to and identification with our own individual self. Only when our attachment to our own ego is greatly attenuated will we have the vairagya, desirelessness or detachment that is necessary for us to be able to relinquish all thoughts or attention to anything other than our own essential self-conscious being, and as an inevitable consequence of this attenuation of our ego, true heart-melting kindness, love and compassion will also naturally arise within us.

Only to the extent to which our ego and all its desires and attachments are truly attenuated will the real love for just being arise in our heart. When this true love for just being arises within us, it will impel us to try repeatedly to withdraw our mind from all objects and to rest in our own essential self-conscious being. However, until our love for just being consumes us entirely, our mind will often slip down from our natural state of self-conscious repose, and whenever we thus experience this seemingly external world our heart-melting love for just being will manifest as tender-hearted compassion, kindness, love and consideration for all other sentient beings, who are each in essence nothing other than our own self-conscious being.

Sri Ramana used to say that bhakti is jñana mata — that is, that devotion or love is the mother of true self-knowledge. In this context bhakti means true heart-melting love for just being — love, that is, for our own infinite self-conscious being. Since our true self-conscious being is infinite, it knows no other, and hence if we truly love our own being we will not feel anything — particularly any sentient being — to be excluded from it or from our love for it.

Therefore so long as we experience even the least duality or otherness, our true love for just being will be experienced by us as a tender-hearted and all-inclusive love and compassion for our fellow sentient beings. Hence if we cultivate true love for just being, as we will naturally do by our persistent practice of self-attentiveness, we need make no separate effort to cultivate any other qualities such as compassion, tenderness or kindness for other sentient beings, because such qualities will result automatically from our love for true being.

However, though we need not make any special effort to cultivate qualities such as compassion or sensitivity for the feelings of others, by cherishing such qualities we can indirectly nourish our love for just being, which alone can enable us to experience the egoless state of true self-knowledge. Only an extremely tender-hearted mind will be overwhelmed by such great love for just being that it will be willing to surrender itself entirely, turning its attention wholly towards its own self-conscious core or essence and thereby subsiding and merging within, losing itself in the absolute clarity of true non-dual self-knowledge.

Just as compassion is a natural effect of true love for just being, so ahimsa or ‘non-harming’ is a natural effect of compassion. If we feel true compassion and tenderness for the feelings of others, we will automatically take care not to do any action that might cause any harm or suffering. Therefore the most important quality that we should strive to cultivate is the true love to subside and rest in our natural state of self-conscious being. If we cultivate this one essential quality, all other qualities will flourish effortlessly and naturally in our heart.

Absolute ahimsa is possible only in the non-dual state of true self-knowledge. The first himsa or ‘harm’ — that is, the first action that causes harm, injury and suffering both to ourself and to all ‘others’ — is the rising of our own mind. When our mind does not rise, everything remains peacefully merged in the true state of non-dual self-conscious being, which is the state of infinite happiness. The imaginary rising of our mind is not only the primal form of himsa, but is also the cause and origin of all other forms of himsa.

Therefore, so long as we imagine ourself to be this body-bound mind or ego, we cannot experience absolute ahimsa, and we cannot entirely avoid doing any form of himsa. Hence if we truly wish to avoid causing any harm whatsoever, we should not only try carefully to regulate all our actions of mind, speech or body in accordance with the morally imperative principle of ahimsa, but should also try to destroy the root cause of every form of himsa, which is our own mind or ego. In order to destroy this root cause of all suffering, the only means is to turn our mind away from all otherness or duality and thereby to drown it in the infinite clarity of our own self-conscious being. This is the reason why Sri Ramana says in the nineteenth paragraph of Nan Yar?:
… It is not proper [for us] to let [our] mind [dwell] much on worldly matters. It is not proper [for us] to enter [or interfere] in the affairs of other people…
The fact that we can truly do good to the world only by withdrawing our mind from it and searching within ourself for the real cause of all suffering is aptly and beautifully illustrated by the compassionate life of Lord Buddha. Like Bhagavan Ramana, Bhagavan Buddha was an embodiment of parama karuna or supreme compassion, kindness and love. As a young man, when he came to know of the inevitable sufferings of embodied existence such as disease, old age and death, he was overwhelmed by an intense desire to discover the root cause of all suffering and the means to destroy that cause. Therefore, though he had great love for his wife, son, father, aunt and other relatives and friends, he left them all and lived the life of a wandering mendicant, earnestly searching for the true knowledge that would put an end to all suffering.

Though at an early stage of his search he hoped to attain such knowledge by practising severe bodily austerities, he eventually understood that no such external means could enable him to attain the truth that he was seeking, and that he could attain it only by searching calmly within himself. Thus by turning his mind away from his body and this world, he was able to experience the true state of nirvana — the absolute extinction of his mind or false finite self.

The reason why Lord Buddha left his beloved wife, child and other relatives was not because he did not care for them. He left them only because his love for them was so great that he could not bear the thought that he was powerless to save them from the inevitable sufferings of embodied existence, and he was therefore determined to find the means to do so.

Only because his love and compassion were so great that he was impelled to withdraw his mind from those he loved most in order to find the real solution to the sufferings of all embodied beings, was he able to attain the true knowledge that enabled him to teach us all the means by which we can attain nirvana, the true state of just being, in which all suffering is extinguished along with its cause, our mind or illusory sense of finite selfhood.

In order to attain true self-knowledge — the state of absolutely non-dual self-conscious being — and thereby to extinguish the root of all suffering, we need not outwardly renounce either our family or the entire world, as Lord Buddha did, but we must inwardly renounce all thought of our false finite self and everything else other than our own essential self-conscious being. Still more importantly, in order to be sufficiently motivated to be able to surrender or let go of our false finite self, we must be impelled by the same intensity of tender-hearted love that impelled Lord Buddha and every other true sage to melt inwardly and surrender themself in the all-consuming fire of true self-knowledge.

All the suffering that we see in this world is only a dream that arises due to the rising of our own mind, so if we are truly concerned about the sufferings of others, we should earnestly try to wake up from this dream by surrendering our self-deceptive mind in the clarity of our own essential self-conscious being. However, though true heart-melting love for our own essential being, which is also the essential being of every other person and creature, is the only means by which we can wake up from this dream of duality or otherness, our present finite love will blossom as the absolute fullness of infinite love only when we have actually destroyed this illusory dream of duality in the perfect clarity of true non-dual self-knowledge.

End of Part 2. Complete




3045
General Discussion / Re: The supreme compassion of Sri Ramana
« on: October 01, 2012, 10:37:30 AM »
Contd...

None of these qualities were cultivated or practised by him with any effort, but were all quite effortless, because they were natural effects of his absolute egolessness.

Because he did not experience himself as an ego, a finite and separate individual consciousness, he did not experience any person, animal, plant or inanimate object as being other than himself, and hence in the infinite fullness of his love — his absolutely non-dual self-love — there was no room for even the least trace of selfishness, greed, desire, attachment, possessiveness, unkindness, insensitivity or any other defect that tends to arise when we mistake ourself to be a finite body-bound ego or mind. He therefore lived what he taught, and taught only what he himself lived.

His actions, his attitude and his response to each person, to each animal and to each outward situation and event were therefore teachings that were no less powerful or significant than his spoken and written words. He exemplified in his life the same state of absolute egolessness that he taught us as being the only goal worth seeking. Therefore, though we cannot emulate his perfectly egoless life so long as we mistake ourself to be a person, a body-bound mind or ego-consciousness, we can learn much from it, and if we truly wish to lose our false individual self in our own natural state of absolutely egoless self-conscious being, we should humbly and sincerely try to apply what we are able to learn from his outward life in our own outward life.

That is, if we truly wish to be absolutely egoless, we must begin even now to practise the selfless qualities and virtues that are natural to egolessness. If we do not love and cherish such qualities, we do not truly love the state of perfect egolessness.

The consistently selfless simplicity of Sri Ramana’s lifestyle was legendary and witnessed by thousands of people. Though his devotees built an ashram, a community dwelling-place and religious institution, around him, he never claimed anything as his own. And though there were rich people who offered him and honestly desired to give him anything that he might want, he availed himself of nothing other than the minimum food, clothing and shelter that were necessary for the survival of his body.

From the time he left home at the age of sixteen till the end of his bodily lifetime, he lived the simple life of a sadhu, a religious mendicant. His only clothing was a kaupina, a simple loincloth. Until his devotees built a simple dwelling-place for him, he lived only in caves or in mandapams, open temple hallways. Even in the later years of his life, when he lived in a small hall that his devotees had built for him, its doors were open to visitors day and night, and he shared it freely with other permanent or temporary residents, who lived and slept there with him. He had no private life or time for himself, but was available always for anyone who needed him.

He preferred to eat only the simplest of food, and even when he was offered any type of special food, whether a delicacy such as a sweet or a savoury titbit, an elaborately prepared feast, or even a medicinal tonic for bodily health, he would eat it only if it were first shared equally with all people who were present. Just as he shared his shelter, his time and his entire life with everyone in his presence, so he shared with them freely and equally whatever food or other material thing he was given.

The only type of food that he strictly avoided, and that he advised others to avoid equally strictly, was any form of non-vegetarian food such as meat, fish or eggs. In this and many other ways he taught us emphatically that we should always avoid any action that would cause even the least harm, injury or suffering to any creature.

End of Part 1


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