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Messages - Subramanian.R

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8881

One way of looking at it, is to be at NOW and not expect anything descending from heavens,
but only removing the dust in the Heart.  It is due to this "dust", which is huge like galactic
dust between two zodiacs, that takes time for removal.  In some cases it is 50 years and in some
other cases it is a relatively short time.  The best thing is to practice Self Enquiry to be in NOW
and seek His grace to expeditiously remove the dust.

Kutram mutru aruthu enai gunamaai panithu aaL
Guru uru vai oLir Arunachala.
                                          -  Verse 19 of Sri AAMM.

Please snap all my deficiencies and fill me with all goodness
and be my Guru and shine in me in all effulgence, O Arunachala!

Arunachala Siva. 

8882
Patanjali outlines eight systematc steps towards conquest of mind and achieving self mastery.  The first
two limbs , Yama and Niyama, are the foundations of spiritual life and lay great emphasis on ethical purity,
unselfishness and devotion to God, the guru and scriptural study.  The next two limbs focus on Asana
(body postures) and Pranayama (breath control), which are extremely valuable in improving one's
physical fitness and sense of well being, without which one cannot possibly meditate in depth and for
extended periods.  Pranayama in particular helps achieve nadi shuddi (cleansing of subtle psychic channels
through which the life force is distributed all over the body) and this directly helps to pacify the mind and
enhance the Sattva Guna that is so essential for spiritual advancement.  Bhagavan has spoken highly of the
value pranayama in making the mind one pointed and fit to focus on Atma Vichara. (Upadesa Undiyar
Verses 11-14).

These four steps come under the category of hatha yoga, while the next four steps come under Raja Yoga
proper, as they exclusively deal with directly taming the mind.   These are Pratyahara (withdrawal of the
habitually outgoing mind), and Dharana (concentration and focusing the mind), Dhyana (meditation) and
Samadhi (absorption of the mind in the Self). This leads to eventual recognition of Jiva Brahma Aikya,
the liberating knowledge that unites jiva with Brahman.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

8883
For many years we traveled by bus from Bangalore to Tiruvannamalai. About two years ago, we were
pleasantly surprised to hear that a train from Kurla to Yashwantpur would continue on to Pondicherry,
through Tiruvannamalai.  It seemed that Ramana Himself had organized a train from Davangere to
Tiruvannamalai. Is not this a true example of Bhagavan's affection towards His devotees. 

Sri Allamma Prabhu, the great Shiva sharana (devotee of Lord Siva) of the 12th century in Karnakata
and Nijaguna Siva Yogi of the 15th century, were Masters and Jnanis and were praised and loved by
Sri Ramana.  Bhagavan read the writings of these two great personalities and sometimes guided His
devotees by narrating instances about them.

Like the sixty three Tamizh Nayanmars, the Siva sharanas of the 12th century were devotees of Lord
Siva, who strove only for his love and grace and created a spiritual atmosphere wherever they went.
The period of the Saranas is considered a period of great spiritual revolution. People of all castes came
together to attain the knowledge and bliss and were transformed into Maha Siva Saranas.  They wrote
about their spiritual experiences and their way of life in verses called Vachanas.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

8884
My wife Nagu never turned away a beggar empty handed for she had heard Sri Bhagavan once say
in the Asramam kitchen: 'When a beggar comes, give him whatever you can, be it even an Indian
gooseberry. Who knows who comes in the form of the beggar?'

I started working at Sri Ramanasramam from 1938.  Yogi Ramaiah and the advocate Sri Sambasiva Rao
wrote to me and requested that I resign from Bank of Chettinad and come to the Asramam and help
run the administration.  Upon arrival at the Asramam I was in a dilemma.  I was a householder, the family
consisting of myself, Nagu, two sons, Aunt Alamelu and Uncle Pitchu Iyer.  My father, the Asramam
Sarvadhikari was fiercely strict and would not permit a family to live within the Asramam.  Feeling it would
not be possible to accept any responsibility in the Asramam without Bhagavan's approval, I sent a
family friend to the Asramam to obtain Bhagavan's approval.

After discussing the matter with Yogi Ramaiah, my friend mentioned the subject to Bhagavan, when He was
alone near the Hill.  It seems that Sri Bhagavan said straightaway, 'Venkitoo is a family man. So what?
The needs of the family can be met by the Asramam.'  This solved the problem. I would go there in the
morning and return after dusk to our family home outside the Asramam.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

8885
Since some of these various meanings of 'sphur' and 'spuri', such as to shine forth, spring into view,
become clear, or strike one's mind, imply an experience that is somehow new, one of the connotations
both of these verbs and of their various derivatives, such as the verbal nouns Sphuranam in Sanskrit
and 'spurippu' in Tamizh, is newness or freshness. Therefore, in the context of self awareness but more
specifically a fresh clarity (or fresh degree of clarity) of self awareness.

Hence, after Bhagavan explained to him (Devaraja Mudaliar) that sphurana means 'vilanguvadhu'   
(shining or being clear) or 'vilakkuvadu' (making clear), if Devaraja Mudaliar had asked, 'But is not
'I' always shining or making itself clear?  In what sense, then is Aham Sphurana any different to the
ordinary shining of 'I' that we already experience?'  He would have probably replied by explaining
that the term Aham Sphurana does not denote merely the ordinary shining of 'I' or the ordinary
manner in which it makes it clear, but more specifically a fresh and more clearly shining of 'I'     

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

8886
General Discussion / Re: The Man on the Golden Horse:
« on: March 03, 2016, 12:57:29 PM »
Dear  ksksat  27.,

1.  The works of Ramana and His close devotees must have been read by many sadhakas as also the
commentaries on them.  Enough has been written on them.  If there is any new angle in which these
are looked upon by some writers I no doubt cover them.


2.  The article in Mountain Path are not like these.  They must have been read only by a few, and some
of them might have even missed the articles which I chose.  Further, it reveals the stories of various
devotees and their experiences and some of them were casual visitors (like the pall bearers) and what
Ramana told them, and what they have understood - are important.  Hence I choose to write from the
articles.   

3. Apart from these, I also write from Viveka Chudamani, Ribhu Gita, Kaivalya Navaneetham and other important works of Advaita.

4.  I also cover the entire Saiva Siddhanta works (at least select verses). Canon 1 to 12.  These reveal,
apart from what they have written about Siva, and their experience with Siva Puja, like Hunter Kannappa.
Sri Bhagavan Himself has said that there is no difference between Siddhanta and Advaita.
 
5. I can also write about Vaishnava literature the works of Azhwars.  But my knowledge is limited about
these works.  Hence they will have to wait, till I acquire knowledge about them.

6. Excepting Andal's works which is quite famous I have not covered about them. 

7.  I also write about important devotees of Bhagavan and Siva, about their attaining mukti.  I write
only on their date of liberation.

8.  I also write on happenings in the Asramam, like Punarvasu day function etc.,

9.  The article on Sphuranam is new one with giving meaning of the word and what it means
when a sadhaka attains the Sphuranam in the Heart. Many may not know what is this Sphuranam?

Arunachala Siva.       

8887
Ellam Onre (All are One) was a little book written by one Subramanyan from the Advaitic view-point.
Sri Bhagavan read this Tamizh book, gave chapter titles, and told one of His devotees, 'If you want
moksha read this book.'   The contents of this book were serialized in the Tamizh daily Swadesamithran.
Bhagavan would personally cut the article from the paper and ask the Asramam office to send it to me.

When I was the President of Sri Ramanasramam I had to tackle many administrativem problems.  There
were a series of court cases.  I had to brief the lawyers and be present in the courts, from the lower courts
up to the Madras High Court.  All this left me little time for the study of Sri Bhagavan's teachings and to
pursue self inquiry vigorously.  I heartily agreed with those who said that I did not know an akshram
(letter) of Bhagavan's Aksaramanamalai (Marital Garland of Letters).

However, I always felt that Sri Bhagavan was guiding me all the time. I felt His Presence around me
protecting me and the Asramam.  The kind of work that I had to do as Asramam President demanded
tremendous patience, tenacity and courage and Sri Bhagavan blessed me with these traits.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

8888
However, this recognition of the oneness of the Self can take place only in a pure and subtle intellect
and this prerequisite alone brings forth in full force the implications of the word Yoga in the stage
of Sadhana for an earnest seeker and its due place in the scheme of things.  The first classical
compilation of Yoga was given by the ancient sage Patanjali in his celebrated treatise, Ashtanga Yoga
Sutra which remains the last word, by virtue of its profound treatment of the subject.  To gain a pure
mind and a subtle intellect capable of undertaking self inquiry, one must necessarily possess a fully
integrated personality. Sri Ramana was equipped with such a competent tool when He undertook mself
inquiry as a 16 year old lad and in a flash His spiritual journey was over in a single leap.

Yoga therefore means 'integration of the personality' and precedes Jnana, which transcends the limited
individuality by seeing its falsity (Mithya Svabhava).  Thus it should be clear that without integrating
the personality in all its aspects, transcending its limitations through knowledge (bodha) will remain an
unrealistic hope, much like a chimera.  This is the rationale behind Sri Krishna's tireless advice to Arjuna
to strive to become a Yogi first, as a preparation to gain Jnana Nishta.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

8889
General topics / Re: The Unexpected Feast- Smt. T. R. Kanammal
« on: March 03, 2016, 10:16:12 AM »
Bhagavan answered:

'Don't think you alone are pall bearers.  All of us are carrying these lifeless corpses.  This body is a
veritable corpse.  Everybody carries it saying 'I, I'.  Whoever has the 'I am the body feeling' is but a
pall bearer.  As long as one has not gone beyond this, one remains as impure and polluted pall bearer.
The pollution of bearing this dead body cannot be washed away by a dip in any tank.  Bathing in the holy
waters of the Atman alone can remove this pollution.'

The Brahmins, though initially feeling vindicated, were now startled and stared at each other.  In an
instant, the entire complexion  of the issue stood transformed.  Everyone without exception was equally
polluted!  All people shared their fate!

Rid of their social inferiority they felt lifted up.  The felicity with which Atma Bodha  -- the eternal truth
-- was transmitted to them and others in the Hall, and the sama drishti of Bhagavan, that knew no
distinction between regular devotees and stray visitors, however socially unsavory their vocation might
be, left those seated in the Hall astounded.  That we are all bound to die is known to everyone. But even
before we die, if we have not yet bathed in the waters of the Atman, we are already as though dead,
bearing with us lifeless corpses lost in the "I am the body" consciousness.  This was a revelation for one
and all gathered in the Hall.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               
   

8890
Sometimes my heart wept and melted, looking at the photos of Bhagavan when He sat on the hot rocks
of Arunachala, caring nothing for the sun's heat that scorched His human form.  At His Asramam He
fed us with delicious food, and soothed our bodies and souls under the cool roofs.  Such motherliness
makes my heart melt and tears come to my eyes.  We are indeed fortunate to have a father and master
like Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi.

Bhagavan silently summons us every year.  We, a group of ten to fifteen, come once or twice a year
and stay for three to four days in Sri Ramanasramam under His divine care.  Bhagavan takes us into
deep meditation, immersing our karmic minds in the divine water of the invisible Ganges, eliminating
all obstacles and washing out the impurities of the mind, to realize the only 'I'.  In the twenty five
years that we have made our annual journeys to Tiruvannamalai we became acquainted with Sri
Ramanasramam, Arunachala Hill, the Arunachala Temple, the Giri Pradakshina route and the railway
station which brings us to Him.  Beyond these places, we never felt the need to go as the whole world
lies within Sri Ramanasramam.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

8891
12. Chitta vaayavas chit kriyaayutaah
      saakhayor dvayi sakti mulaka.

Mind, breath, manifesting in thought and action, branch out from a common source, the Sakti.

Since breathing and thinking are rooted in the same life force, the control of one amounts to
control of the other.  One might oversimplify saying, 'Each time an individual breathes, the mind
cerebrates.  No breath, no thought, no thought, no breath.'  In the story of the goblin, Vetala,
Vasishta tells Rama, 'Both are one only, like the flower and its fragrance or sesame seed and the oil
in it.  Prana (breath) and mind stand to one another in the relationship of the supporter and the supported.
If either of them is slain, then the other will also cease to exist.  The destruction of both will confer moksha
on all.' (Aiyer, Yoga Vasishta).

The greatness of Upadesa Saram, lies not so much in the content of each verse as in the way that
the poem ties together all the major Margas, or paths of spiritual discipline.  In this verse, for instance,
there is nothing new.  In the earliest of all His writings, Who am I?, Maharshi says, 'The source of the mind,
on the one hand, and of breath and vital forces on the other, is one and the same,

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

8892
In English books on the teachings of Bhagavan, though the noun Sphuranam is used, the verb 'sphur',
from which this verbal noun is derived, is not used, whereas in Sanskrit He used this verb as He did for
example in Verse 20 of Upadesa Saram, where He used it to describe the shining forth of oneself as
'I am I'  after the ego is destroyed by self investigation,  perhaps as frequently as He used its noun form,
Sphuranam, and in Tamizh, He sometimes used its equivalents, 'spuri' or 'puri'.   The Sanskrit verb
'sphur' means to shine, be bright, be clear, be evident, make itself known, flash to mind, appear clearly,
become visible, manifest, arise, shine forth, burst out plainly, start to view, spring, dart, flash, sparkle,
glitter, gleam, glisten, twinkle, twitch, tremble, throb, palpitate, jerk or kick (and thus it is etymologically
related to English words spurn or spur, which like it are believed to be derived from a Proto-Indo-European
meaning to twitch, push or kick).  In Tamizh the frequently used verb 'puri' which means to shine, be
manifest, be clear to be understood, and its much less frequently used form 'spuri' which tends to mean
more specifically to strike one's mind, are both derived from this Sanskrit verb 'sphur'.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                   

8893
Verse 315  & 316:


The ego is increased by these two, so one should seek the destruction of these (the ego and its two causes)
by meditating on the real Self, seeing Brahman everywhere.  And these three go only by increasing the
desire for being good to others.

Verse  317:

If you stop selfish work, you stop the internal desire.  By stopping the internal desire, you stop the selfish
thought.  And the stopping of desire is what is called freedom even in this life itself - Jivan Mukti.   

Verse  318:

With that desire for being good to others increases the desire for selfish fulfilments subside.  As when
the sun rises, all the darkness subsides.

Verse  319:

Darkness and its actions (different kinds of mistakes that come from the darkness) are not seen when
sun, the Lord of the day, rises.  So, when that one, eternal Blissfulness is felt, there is no more bondage,
neither is there the scent of sorrow.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

8894
General topics / Re: Tevaram - Some select verses.
« on: March 03, 2016, 08:43:04 AM »
Verse 160:


முன்னைநாள் போல்வந்து
    திருமுகலிப் புனல்மூழ்கிப்
பன்முறையும் தம்பிரான்
   அருள்செய்த படிநினைந்து
மன்னுதிருக் காளத்தி 
   மலையேறி முன்புபோல்
பிஞ்ஞகனைப் பூசித்துப் 
   பின்பாக ஒளித்திருந்தார்.



He had his bath in the divine Mukali
As on the day before, and he contemplated the grace
Of the lord in multifoliate ways.
He ascended the Hill of Tiru-k-Kalatthi
And did his pooja to Pinggnakan as is his wont
And then stood in hiding, behind the Lord.   

Arunachala Siva.

8895
General topics / Re: Tevaram - Some select verses.
« on: March 03, 2016, 08:41:23 AM »
Verse  159:


கனவுநிலை நீங்கியபின் 
   விழித்துணர்ந்து கங்குலிடைப்
புனைதவத்து மாமுனிவர் 
   புலர்வளவும் கண்துயிலார்
மனமுறும்அற் புதமாகி 
   வரும்பயமும் உடனாகித்
துனைபுரவித் தனித்தேர்மேல்
    தோன்றுவான் கதிர்தோன்ற.


He woke up from his dream, the great muni of tapas;
He wouldn?t sleep during the rest of the night;
It was his night of mystical tremendum.
At dawn Aruna rose up in his car unique
Yoked to a single swift steed.   

Arunachala Siva.

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